Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 17

May 3, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 17

Pages 1915–2019

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. High-Strength Carbon Nanotubes: High-Strength Carbon Nanotube Fibers Fabricated by Infiltration and Curing of Mussel-Inspired Catecholamine Polymer (Adv. Mater. 17/2011) (page 1915)

      Seongwoo Ryu, Yuhan Lee, Jae-Won Hwang, Seonki Hong, Chunsoo Kim, Tae Gwan Park, Haeshin Lee and Soon Hyung Hong

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190059

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Super-strong carbon nanotube fibers can be fabricated by infiltration of poly(ethylenimine)-catechols (PEI-Cs), report Tae Gwan Park, Haeshin Lee, Soon Hyung Hong, and co-workers on p. 1971. PEI-C mimics the amino acid sequence of mussel adhesive proteins in which catechols from 3,4-dihydroxyl-l-phenylalanine and amines from lysine are found. Weak interactions between CNTs are overcome by heat-induced, metal-catalyzed chemical crosslinking of catechol, resulting in high-strength CNT fibers.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Polymer Nanowire Writing: Three-Dimensional Writing of Conducting Polymer Nanowire Arrays by Meniscus-Guided Polymerization (Adv. Mater. 17/2011) (page 1916)

      Ji Tae Kim, Seung Kwon Seol, Jaeyeon Pyo, Ji San Lee, Jung Ho Je and G. Margaritondo

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190060

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The inside cover shows “nanocandle arrays” of conducting polymer. On p. 1968 Jung Ho Je, G. Margaritondo, and co-workers demonstrate accurate and versatile three-dimensional writing of conducting polymer nanowires based on guiding a monomer meniscus by pulling a micropipette during oxidative polymerization. This is an important step forward for the integration of organic electronic devices with high density and enhanced freedom in circuit design.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
  4. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Ultrasonic Cavitation at Solid Surfaces (pages 1922–1934)

      Dmitry G. Shchukin, Ekaterina Skorb, Valentina Belova and Helmuth Möhwald

      Version of Record online: 18 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004494

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      High-intensity ultrasound enables high-temperature and high-pressure chemistry with a reactor near room temperature and ambient pressure. It can be employed for the development of new materials and composite nanostructures. This review demonstrates conceptual solutions for controlled sonochemical fabrication of new surfaces and particles. Moreover, there are still great prospects in such materials development.

    2. Paper Electronics (pages 1935–1961)

      Daniel Tobjörk and Ronald Österbacka

      Version of Record online: 23 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004692

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ongoing research on usingpaper as a substrate for low-cost flexible electronic applications is reviewed. The advantages of paper can be utilized by choosing suitable device structures, inexpensive materials, and low-cost manufacturing processes. Simple ring-oscillator structures can, for example, be printed on paper using a roll-to-roll process.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Orientation of a Helical Nanofilament (B4) Liquid-Crystal Phase: Topographic Control of Confinement, Shear Flow, and Temperature Gradients (pages 1962–1967)

      Dong Ki Yoon, Youngwoo Yi, Yongqiang Shen, Eva D. Korblova, David M. Walba, Ivan I. Smalyukh and Noel A. Clark

      Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004482

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Oriented domains of the chiral/polar crystalline helical nanofilaments of the bent-core liquid crystal B4 phase are reported. A combination of topographic confinement of the bent-core molecule in micrometer-scale rectangular channels etched into a silicon surface with cooling from the isotropic melt in the presence of an air flow over the surface yields nanofilament orientation parallel to the flow.

    2. Three-Dimensional Writing of Conducting Polymer Nanowire Arrays by Meniscus-Guided Polymerization (pages 1968–1970)

      Ji Tae Kim, Seung Kwon Seol, Jaeyeon Pyo, Ji San Lee, Jung Ho Je and G. Margaritondo

      Version of Record online: 22 FEB 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004528

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Accurate and versatile three-dimensional writing of individually controlled conducting polymer nanodevices forming dense arrays is demonstrated by guiding a monomer meniscus in pulling a micropipette during oxidative polymerization. We specifically demonstrate well-defined dense arrays of various freestanding nanocomponents with controlled radius down to ∼50 nm: straight wires, nanowires with variable radius, branches, and bridges.

    3. High-Strength Carbon Nanotube Fibers Fabricated by Infiltration and Curing of Mussel-Inspired Catecholamine Polymer (pages 1971–1975)

      Seongwoo Ryu, Yuhan Lee, Jae-Won Hwang, Seonki Hong, Chunsoo Kim, Tae Gwan Park, Haeshin Lee and Soon Hyung Hong

      Version of Record online: 15 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004228

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Super-strong carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers are fabricated by infiltration of the mussel-inspired underwater adhesives, poly(ethylenimine)-catechols (PEI-Cs). PEI-C mimics the amino acid sequence of mussel adhesive proteins in which catechols from 3,4- dihydroxyl-L-phenylalanine and amines from lysine are found. Weak interactions between CNTs are overcome by heat-induced, metal-catalyzed chemical crosslinking of catechol. PEI-C’s strong and versatile adhesion results in high-strength CNT fibers.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Photopatterning: Mechanophotopatterning on a Photoresponsive Elastomer (Adv. Mater. 17/2011) (page 1976)

      Christopher J. Kloxin, Timothy F. Scott, Hee Young Park and Christopher N. Bowman

      Version of Record online: 27 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190062

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Mechanophotopatterning on a photoreversible covalent adaptable network allows complex topo-graphical features to be fabricated by performing sequential stretching and light exposure steps, report Christopher Kloxin and co-workers on p. 1977. In this image, the material was stretched and exposed to a square-array photomask, followed by a second exposure to a square-array photomask rotated 45°. The lens quality of this material is demonstrated when backlit by an LCD display.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Reviews
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Mechanophotopatterning on a Photoresponsive Elastomer (pages 1977–1981)

      Christopher J. Kloxin, Timothy F. Scott, Hee Young Park and Christopher N. Bowman

      Version of Record online: 1 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100323

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Photopatterning of a photoreversible cova­lent elastomeric network under mechanical strain, or mechanophotopatterning, provides a facile approach to fabricate complex topographical features using elementary irradiation schemes. A photoresponsive material is deformed in two dimensions and irradiated through a mask, resulting in a transparent material with topography that reflects the concentric rings of the mask.

    2. Ultraintense Luminescence in Semiconducting-Material-Sheathed MgO Nanorods (pages 1982–1987)

      Changhyun Jin, Hyunsu Kim, Wan In Lee and Chongmu Lee

      Version of Record online: 28 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004266

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Well-faceted MgO nanorods synthesized by the thermal evaporation of Mg3N2are sheathed with TiO2, resulting in ultraintense blue-green luminescence. Intense emissions with a variety of wavelengths, ranging from the ultraviolet to the infrared, may be possible by sheathing MgO nanorods with a semiconducting material of optimal thickness.

    3. High-Performance NiCo2O4 Nanofilm Photodetectors Fabricated by an Interfacial Self-Assembly Strategy (pages 1988–1992)

      Linfeng Hu, Limin Wu, Meiyong Liao and Xiaosheng Fang

      Version of Record online: 24 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004109

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A high-performance NiCo2O4 nanofilm photodetector is fabricated using an oil/water interfacial self-assembly strategy. The device showed high sensitivity, excellent stability, and fast response time compared with other oxide photodetectors. This facile strategy significantly decreases the cost of fabrication and can also be extended to other semiconductor nanofilm devices, making it very promising for applications such as high-frequency photodetectors and photoelectronic switches.

    4. An Omnidirectional Transparent Conducting-Metal-Based Plasmonic Nanocomposite (pages 1993–1997)

      Mady Elbahri, Mehdi Keshavarz Hedayati, Venkata Sai Kiran Chakravadhanula, Mohammad Jamali, Thomas Strunkus, Vladimir Zaporojtchenko and Franz Faupel

      Version of Record online: 28 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201003811

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A transparent conducting metal (TCM) composed of a stack of a gold film and silver/polymer nanocomposite fabricated by sputtering onto a glass substrate is presented. The plasmonic metamaterial shows an omnidirectional optical transmission up to 80% in the visible spectrum, which is comparable to that of ITO, and the electrical conductivity is one order of magnitude higher than that of ITO.

    5. Long-Range Visible Fluorescence Tunability Using Component-Modulated Coupled Quantum Dots (pages 1998–2003)

      Sucheta Sengupta, Nirmal Ganguli, I. Dasgupta, D. D. Sarma and Somobrata Acharya

      Version of Record online: 22 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004126

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple route for tailoring emissions in the visible wavelength region by chemically coupling quantum dots composed of ZnSe and CdS is reported. Coupled quantum dots offer a novel route for tuning electronic transitions via band-offset engineering at the material interface. This novel class of asymmetric-coupled quantum structures may offer a basis for a diverse set of building blocks for optoelectronic devices, ultrahigh density memories, and quantum information processing.

    6. Ultrafiltration Membranes Composed of Highly Cross-Linked Cationic Polymer Gel: the Network Structure and Superior Separation Performance (pages 2004–2008)

      Qifeng Wang, Sadaki Samitsu and Izumi Ichinose

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100475

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ultrafiltration membranes with a thickness of several tens of nanometers are prepared from cross-linked poly(4-vinylpyridine) gel using a flat and smooth sacrificial layer of metal hydroxide nanostrands. The membranes have a network structure with pores sizes of approximately 2.0 ± 1.0 nm and can separate small proteins and organic dyes at a surprisingly high filtration rate.

    7. Graphene–Biomineral Hybrid Materials (pages 2009–2014)

      Sungjin Kim, Sook Hee Ku, Seong Yoon Lim, Jae Hong Kim and Chan Beum Park

      Version of Record online: 17 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100010

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graphene-based biomineral hybrid materials are synthesized by biomimetic mineralization of CO2 into CaCO3 in the presence of graphene oxide (GO) sheets. The hybrid film could be further reduced to a conductive graphene–CaCO3 hybrid film. The GO/graphene–CaCO3 hybrid showed enhanced in vitro bone bioactivity with increased hydroxyapatite formation in simulated body fluid and good osteoblast cell viability.

    8. Rapid Transfer-Based Micropatterning and Dry Etching of Silk Microstructures (pages 2015–2019)

      Konstantinos Tsioris, Hu Tao, Mengkun Liu, Jeffrey A. Hopwood, David L. Kaplan, Richard D. Averitt and Fiorenzo G. Omenetto

      Version of Record online: 28 MAR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004771

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The silk transfer applied micropatterning (STAMP) method enables patterning of large area silk fibroin protein films with metallic microfabricated features. All processing is performed under ambient conditions in an aqueous environment. The micropatterns fabricated enable masking of biopolymer films for dry etching to produce protein-based metamaterial structures.

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