Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 2

January 11, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 2

Pages 141–308

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Reviews
    1. Metal-Organic Frameworks: Metal-Organic Frameworks: A Rapidly Growing Class of Versatile Nanoporous Materials (Adv. Mater. 2/2011) (page 141)

      Scott T. Meek, Jeffery A. Greathouse and Mark D. Allendorf

      Version of Record online: 30 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201090167

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The cover shows the structure of IRMOF-10, one of a rapidly expanding class of crystalline nano porous materials known as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs), which have synthetically tailorable pore dimensions and chemical properties. The versatility of these novel materials is generating interest across a wide spectrum of applications, including luminescent materials (crystals, lower left), drug delivery (middle polyhedron), and gas storage and separation (lower right). The status of these applications is reviewed on p. 249 by Mark Allendorf and co-workers.

  2. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Reviews
  3. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Reviews
    1. Nanostructures and Functional Materials Fabricated by Interferometric Lithography (pages 147–179)

      Deying Xia, Zahyun Ku, S. C. Lee and S. R. J. Brueck

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001856

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanostructures and functional materials fabricated by interferometric lithography (IL) are reviewed in this article. Applications of IL for nanostructures and functional materials include directed self-assembly of colloidal nanoparticles, nanophotonics, nanopatterning for semiconductor materials growth, and nanofluidic devices. Perspectives on future directions for further developments in IL and emerging applications in other fields are discussed.

  4. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Reviews
    1. Emergent Properties Resulting from Type-II Band Alignment in Semiconductor Nanoheterostructures (pages 180–197)

      Shun S. Lo, Tihana Mirkovic, Chi-Hung Chuang, Clemens Burda and Gregory D. Scholes

      Version of Record online: 11 NOV 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002290

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The characteristic band alignment of the constituent semiconductor materials in type-II heterostructures promotes spatial separation of the photoexcited carriers. The photophysical properties of these nanoheterostructures are tunable through the variation of their geometric and compositional parameters. The excited state dynamics in these systems are sensitive to external factors such as temperature, the dielectric properties of the solvent, or the presence of external electric fields.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Reviews
    1. Silicon Nanowires for Photovoltaic Solar Energy Conversion (pages 198–215)

      Kui-Qing Peng and Shuit-Tong Lee

      Version of Record online: 7 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002410

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Silicon nanowires (SiNWs) are attracting intense interest as a promising material for solar energy conversion for the new-generation photovoltaic (PV) technology. This article reviews recent developments in the utilization of SiNWs for PV applications, the relationship between SiNW-based PV device structure and performance, and the challenges to obtaining high-performance cost-effective solar cells.

  6. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Reviews
    1. Size Effects on Magnetic Actuation in Ni-Mn-Ga Shape-Memory Alloys (pages 216–232)

      David C. Dunand and Peter Müllner

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002753

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In Ni-Mn-Ga alloys the large twinning magnetic-field-induced strains (MFIS) present in monocrystals become negligible in polycrystals due to grain-boundaries constraints. When grain and sample sizes become comparable, constraints are relaxed and high MFIS become again possible. We review Ni-Mn-Ga powders, fibers, ribbons, and films where bamboo grains produce large MFIS, and “constructs” from these elements (mats, laminates, textiles, foams and composites).

  7. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Reviews
    1. White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 233–248)

      Malte C. Gather, Anne Köhnen and Klaus Meerholz

      Version of Record online: 25 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002636

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      White organic light-emitting diodes (WOLEDs) offer many attractive characteristics, including high power efficiencies rivalling the performance of fluorescent lamps and inorganic LEDs and potentially very low manufacturing cost. As flat-panel light sources they are intrinsically glare-free and generate light over a large area. WOLEDs are constantly improving in terms of performance, durability, manufacturability, generating exciting scientific questions and answers.

    2. Metal-Organic Frameworks: A Rapidly Growing Class of Versatile Nanoporous Materials (pages 249–267)

      Scott T. Meek, Jeffery A. Greathouse and Mark D. Allendorf

      Version of Record online: 22 OCT 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201002854

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metal–organic frameworks (MOFs), such as MOF-5 (see figure), represent a relatively new class of hybrid organic-inorganic materials. This Progress Report summarizes recent advances in the field of MOFs with a focus on applications, including synthesis, computational modeling, gas separations, catalysis, drug delivery, optical and electronic properties, and sensing.

  8. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Contents
    4. Review
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Reviews
    1. Rylene and Related Diimides for Organic Electronics (pages 268–284)

      Xiaowei Zhan, Antonio Facchetti, Stephen Barlow, Tobin J. Marks, Mark A. Ratner, Michael R. Wasielewski and Seth R. Marder

      Version of Record online: 10 DEC 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001402

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Electronic devices based on organic materials offer the potential of low-cost processing on flexible substrates when compared to traditional inorganic semiconductors. Rylene diimides have recently shown promise as potential alternatives to the fullerenes as acceptors in photovoltaic devices, exhibiting power conversion efficiencies that are amongst the highest achieved for all-polymer fullerene-free systems. This article reviews their development for both transistor and solar cell applications.

    2. Metal-Assisted Chemical Etching of Silicon: A Review : In memory of Prof. Ulrich Gösele (pages 285–308)

      Zhipeng Huang, Nadine Geyer, Peter Werner, Johannes de Boor and Ulrich Gösele

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001784

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metal-assisted chemical etching (MACE) of silicon is controllable, reproducible, and can be used reliably to create well-defined nanostructures. The mechanism, the influence of various factors on MACE, the controllable fabrication of patterned Si and SiGe structures, the applications of Si structures created by MACE, and the etching of other semiconductors by the MACE are reviewed.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION