Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 25

July 5, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 25

Pages 2771–2876

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Progress Report
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    1. Graphene Assembly: Bioinspired Effective Prevention of Restacking in Multilayered Graphene Films: Towards the Next Generation of High-Performance Supercapacitors (Adv. Mater. 25/2011) (page 2771)

      Xiaowei Yang, Junwu Zhu, Ling Qiu and Dan Li

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190093

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      It has been a big challenge to keep individual graphene sheets apart in a bulk assembly. On page 2833, Dan Li and co-workers report that solvation provides a very simple and effective approach to address this key problem. This success enables the creation of a new generation of energy storage devices that combine high energy density, high power density, and high operation rates. Cover design by Gengping Jiang.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Progress Report
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    1. Hybrid Materials: Diamond in Tellurite Glass: a New Medium for Quantum Information (Adv. Mater. 25/2011) (page 2772)

      M. R. Henderson, B. C. Gibson, H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem, K. Kuan, S. Afshar V., J. O. Orwa, I. Aharonovich, S. Tomljenovic-Hanic, A. D. Greentree, S. Prawer and T. M. Monro

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190094

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      Nitrogen-vacancy (NV) centers in diamond exhibit unique quantum properties. On page 2806, Matthew R. Henderson and co-workers describe integrated diamond nanocrystals containing NV centers with an optical medium, tellurite soft glass. The inside cover image shows an example of a confocal scan of an optical fiber drawn from this material, detecting the photoluminescence from NV centers, with a conceptual image of a scan in progress.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Progress Report
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
  4. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Progress Report
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    1. You have free access to this content
      Correction: Modeling the Relaxation Mechanism of Amorphous Shape Memory Polymers (page 2778)

      T. D. Nguyen, C. M. Yakacki, P. D. Brahmbhatt and M. L Chambers

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190096

      This article corrects:

      Modeling the Relaxation Mechanisms of Amorphous Shape Memory Polymers

      Vol. 22, Issue 31, 3411–3423, Article first published online: 28 JUL 2010

  5. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Progress Report
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    1. Graphene as Transparent Electrode Material for Organic Electronics (pages 2779–2795)

      Shuping Pang, Yenny Hernandez, Xinliang Feng and Klaus Müllen

      Article first published online: 26 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100304

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      Organic electronics have led to a rapidly growing market for flexible transparent electrodes. Novel two-dimensional graphene is considered a realistic candidate to replace ITO electrode due to its unique properties, such as favorable work function, low resistance, high optical transmittance, good chemical and thermal stability, high mechanical strength and flexibility.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Progress Report
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    1. Self-Assembly of Hexagonal Peptide Microtubes and Their Optical Waveguiding (pages 2796–2801)

      Xuehai Yan, Junbai Li and Helmuth Möhwald

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100353

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      Hexagonal peptide microtubes are spontaneously formed upon solvent thermal annealing. They have diameters on the order of micrometers and reach several millimeters in length. The microtubes evolve hierarchically in a hexagonal packing pattern from the molecular level to the micrometer scale. Such crystalline peptide microtubes serve as an active optical waveguide, allowing for light propagation along the long axis.

    2. Towards Efficient Hybrid Solar Cells Based on Fully Polymer Infiltrated ZnO Nanorod Arrays (pages 2802–2805)

      Linny Baeten, Bert Conings, Hans-Gerd Boyen, Jan D'Haen, An Hardy, Marc D'Olieslaeger, Jean V. Manca and Marlies K. Van Bael

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100414

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      A significantly improved efficiency is achieved for solar cells based on hydro­thermally grown ZnO nanorods and P3HT. This efficiency is obtained by fine-tuning morphological parameters and by adding electron and hole blocking layers. Insight into the mechanisms underlying the improvement lead to recommendations for further future improvements.

    3. Diamond in Tellurite Glass: a New Medium for Quantum Information (pages 2806–2810)

      M. R. Henderson, B. C. Gibson, H. Ebendorff-Heidepriem, K. Kuan, S. Afshar V., J. O. Orwa, I. Aharonovich, S. Tomljenovic-Hanic, A. D. Greentree, S. Prawer and T. M. Monro

      Article first published online: 20 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100151

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Fabrication of a hybrid diamond-glass material is reported, by embedding diamond nanocrystals containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers into tellurite soft glass. This material allows the fabrication of diamond photonic waveguides using well-established soft glass techniques, such as microstructured optical fiber technology (the figure is a confocal image that shows color center fluorescence in a fiber).

    4. Electrochromic Carbon Electrodes: Controllable Visible Color Changes in Metallic Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (pages 2811–2814)

      Kazuhiro Yanagi, Rieko Moriya, Yohei Yomogida, Taishi Takenobu, Yasuhisa Naitoh, Takao Ishida, Hiromichi Kataura, Kazuyuki Matsuda and Yutaka Maniwa

      Article first published online: 26 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100549

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      Electrochromic devices using colorful metallic single-wall carbon nanotube films are produced. The metallic SWCNTs act as both electrochromic components and electrodes, confirming a route to all carbon nanotube electrochromic devices.

    5. Tunneling Negative Differential Resistance in a Flexible Active Composite (pages 2815–2818)

      Samuel Littlejohn, Alain Nogaret and Simon Crampin

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100442

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      A novel type of negative differential resistance (NDR) is demonstrated in composites incorporating graphite nanoparticles in a silicone matrix. The NDR occurs as the electric field breaks the π-band of graphite, initiating a semimetal-to-insulator transition. The current peak is robust and tunable with the graphite concentration. This material can produce flexible electronic amplifiers for bioelectronic applications

    6. Rational Molecular Design of Stimulus-Responsive Supramolecular Hydrogels Based on Dipeptides (pages 2819–2822)

      Masato Ikeda, Tatsuya Tanida, Tatsuyuki Yoshii and Itaru Hamachi

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004658

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      Stimuli-responsive supramolecular hydro­gels comprising self-assembled nanofiber networks are attractive soft materials because of their potential application in materials science and bionanotechnology. Here, we describe a general strategy for the rational design of stimuli (redox- or photo-)responsive supramolecular hydrogelators by introducing stimuli-triggered degradation units into the N-terminal of a dipeptide. We also demonstrate that its coupling with glucose oxidase allows us to produce a glucose-responsive insulin-releasing gel matrix.

    7. Highly Efficient Orange and White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Based on New Orange Iridium Complexes (pages 2823–2827)

      Renjie Wang, Di Liu, Huicai Ren, Ting Zhang, Hongming Yin, Guangye Liu and Jiuyan Li

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100302

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      Highly efficient, orange organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) fabricated from newly synthesized iridium complexes show a maximum luminance efficiency of 76 cd A−1 and a peak power efficiency of 45 lm W−1. The white OLEDs containing the orange iridium and traditional blue iridium phosphors exhibit extraordinarily high efficiencies and a peak external quantum efficiency of 26%.

    8. Application of the Protection/Deprotection Strategy to the Science of Porous Materials (pages 2828–2832)

      Theo Frot, Willi Volksen, Sampath Purushothaman, Robert Bruce and Geraud Dubois

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100569

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      Selective protection of the porosity can be implemented in porous materials processing by using an organic polymer fill. This strategy is employed to protect ultralow-k (ULK) materials during patterning of 250-nm lines and spaces. Structures with significantly less sidewall and trench bottom damage are obtained, proving the potential of this novel approach in materials science.

    9. Bioinspired Effective Prevention of Restacking in Multilayered Graphene Films: Towards the Next Generation of High-Performance Supercapacitors (pages 2833–2838)

      Xiaowei Yang, Junwu Zhu, Ling Qiu and Dan Li

      Article first published online: 10 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100261

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simple, bioinspired approach to effectively prevent the restacking of chemically converted graphene sheets in multilayered films is presented. The method enables the creation of a new generation of supercapacitors that combine high energy density, high power density, and high operation rates.

    10. Controlled and Sustained Release of Drugs from Dendrimer–Nanoparticle Composite Films (pages 2839–2842)

      Myoung-Hwan Park, Sarit S. Agasti, Brian Creran, Chaekyu Kim and Vincent M. Rotello

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004409

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      A dendrimer–nanoparticle hybrid scaffold based on robust dithiocarbamate formation provides a controlled drug delivery system. These composite films are non-toxic and can incorporate a variety of guests, providing sustained drug release over multiple uses. The system is highly modular: the release process can be easily tuned by altering the dendrimer generation and the size of the AuNPs, generating a versatile delivery system.

  7. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Progress Report
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    1. Organic-Inorganic Nanocomposites: Organic−Inorganic Nanocomposites by Placing Conjugated Polymers in Intimate Contact with Quantum Rods (Adv. Mater. 25/2011) (page 2843)

      Lei Zhao, Xinchang Pang, Ramkrishna Adhikary, Jacob W. Petrich, Malika Jeffries-EL and Zhiqun Lin

      Article first published online: 1 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190097

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      Novel organic-inorganic nanocomposites synthesized by directly grafting end-functionalized conjugated polymers onto quantum rods with a complementary functional group through a robust Heck coupling is reported on page 2844 by Zhiqun Lin and co-workers. This is a promising method to craft semiconductor anisotropic nanocomposites for use in solar cells.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Progress Report
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    1. Organic−Inorganic Nanocomposites by Placing Conjugated Polymers in Intimate Contact with Quantum Rods (pages 2844–2849)

      Lei Zhao, Xinchang Pang, Ramkrishna Adhikary, Jacob W. Petrich, Malika Jeffries-EL and Zhiqun Lin

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100923

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      Novel organic−inorganic nanocomposites are synthesized by directly grafting end-functionalized conjugated polymers (CPs) onto anisotropic nanocrystals (NCs) that have a complimentary functional group through a robust Heck coupling. Such nanocomposites, in which CPs and anisotropic NCs are intimately contacted, are very promising for use in organic−inorganic hybrid solar cells with improved power conversion efficiency.

    2. Non-Peripheral Tetrahexyl-Substituted Vanadyl Phthalocyanines with Intermolecular Cofacial π–π Stacking for Solution-Processed Organic Field-Effect Transistors (pages 2850–2854)

      Shaoqiang Dong, Hongkun Tian, Lizhen Huang, Jidong Zhang, Donghang Yan, Yanhou Geng and Fosong Wang

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004776

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Four structural isomers of non-peripheral tetrahexyl-substituted vanadyl phthalocy­anine can be easily separated using common laboratory column chromatography on a gram scale. The most abundant isomer, 1,8,18,22-tetrahexyl vanadyl phthalocyanine (I-3), adopts intermolecular 2D cofacial ππ stacking and exhibits a field-effect mobility of up to 0.13 cm2 V−1 s−1.

    3. Ultrahigh Strength and Stiffness in Cross-Linked Hierarchical Carbon Nanotube Bundles (pages 2855–2860)

      T. Filleter, R. Bernal, S. Li and H.D. Espinosa

      Article first published online: 29 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100547

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      Electron irradiation induced covalent cross-linking at multiple length scales within double-walled nanotube bundles is demonstrated to lead to ultrahigh effective strength and stiffness. In situ transmission electron microscopy tensile testing reveals both order of magnitude enhancements in the mechanical properties as well as distinct failure mechanisms of cross-linked versus un-crosslinked bundles.

    4. Underwater Oil Capture by a Three-Dimensional Network Architectured Organosilane Surface (pages 2861–2864)

      Meihua Jin, Jing Wang, Xi Yao, Mingyi Liao, Yong Zhao and Lei Jiang

      Article first published online: 2 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101048

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      Nanofibers and microbumps intertwined in 3D networked 1H,1H,2H,2H-perfluorodecyltrichlorosilane (FTS)-derived surfaces are synthesized by a phase separation reaction. The surfaces shows super-amphiphobicity in air and super-oleophilicity under water. The special wettablity of the surface is well retained, even after repeated use and flushing. The surfaces are successfully used to capture and collect oil droplets in water.

    5. Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Aerogel-Based Elastic Conductors (pages 2865–2869)

      Kyu Hun Kim, Mert Vural and Mohammad F. Islam

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100310

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      Flexible conductors of various shapes and sizes with high electrical stability under large elastic stretching and bending are of significant importance in diverse fields ranging from microelectronics to biological implants. Stretchable conductors are fabricated by completely backfilling single-walled carbon nanotube aerogels with elastomeric polymers. The resistance of the stretchable conductors remains nearly unchanged under tensile strain and high bending strain.

  9. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Correction
    6. Progress Report
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Research News
    1. Assessing Possibilities and Limits for Solar Cells (pages 2870–2876)

      Pabitra K. Nayak, Juan Bisquert and David Cahen

      Article first published online: 5 MAY 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100877

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      Several simple criteria, based on cell and module performance data, are used to evaluate and compare all types of today's solar cells. Analyzing these data allows to gauge in how far significant progress can be expected for the various cell types and if basic bounds, beyond those known today, may exist, that can limit such progress.

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