Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 3

Special Issue: Polymer Science at NIST

January 18, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 3

Pages 311–432

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Materials Science at NIST (Adv. Mater. 3/2011) (page 311)

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190000

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      Materials Science at NIST

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Materials Science at NIST (Adv. Mater. 3/2011) (page 312)

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190001

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Materials Science at NIST

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 3/2011) (pages 313–316)

      Article first published online: 3 JAN 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190002

  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
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  5. Progress Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Molecular Characterization of Organic Electronic Films (pages 319–337)

      Dean M. DeLongchamp, R. Joseph Kline, Daniel A. Fischer, Lee J. Richter and Michael F. Toney

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001760

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      The performance of organic electronic materials is closely related to their morphology and molecular packing, which can be measured by combining multiple complementary techniques. This image shows the layered structure of the semiconducting polymer pBTTT, determined by combining information from diffraction, polarized spectroscopies, and scanning probe microscopy.

    2. Carbon Nanotubes: Measuring Dispersion and Length (pages 338–348)

      Jeffrey A. Fagan, Barry J. Bauer, Erik K. Hobbie, Matthew L. Becker, Angela R. Hight Walker, Jeffrey R. Simpson, Jaehun Chun, Jan Obrzut, Vardhan Bajpai, Fred R. Phelan, Daneesh Simien, Ji Yeon Huh and Kalman B. Migler

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001756

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      Advanced technological uses of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) rely on the production of single length and chirality populations that are currently only available through liquid-phase postprocessing. The current state of the art for measuring dispersion and length populations is documented, and examples are used to demonstrate the desirability of addressing these parameters.

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Surface Wrinkling: A Versatile Platform for Measuring Thin-Film Properties (pages 349–368)

      Jun Young Chung, Adam J. Nolte and Christopher M. Stafford

      Article first published online: 2 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001759

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      Wrinkling instabilities have enabled new thin-film measurement strategies and are energizing research efforts to pattern and control surfaces in unique and powerful ways. Recent work in the field is reviewed, focusing on how instability-based techniques can meet future metrological challenges and provide low-cost and straightforward approaches to active and on-demand management of material properties.

    2. Combinatorial and High-Throughput Screening of Biomaterials (pages 369–387)

      Carl G. Simon Jr. and Sheng Lin-Gibson

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001763

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      Combinatorial and high-throughput testing of several biomaterials: Examples are illustrated to demonstrate the versatility of gradient fabrication, quantification, and analysis. Images shown are progressive scratches of dental composites; a heat map indicating cell population on a roughness gradient; osteoblast mineralization in a hydrogel modulus gradient; a radioopacity gradient of an iodinated scaffold; an FTIR heat map of gradient in composition for a polymer blend; and a corresponding spherulites gradient imaged through crossed polarizers.

    3. Photoresist Latent and Developer Images as Probed by Neutron Reflectivity Methods (pages 388–408)

      Vivek M. Prabhu, Shuhui Kang, David L. VanderHart, Sushil K. Satija, Eric K. Lin and Wen-li Wu

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001762

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      In situ formed solid/solid and solid/liquid interfaces, by reaction-diffusion and swelling-dissolution, respectively, of polymer photoresist thin films are measured directly by neutron reflectivity to highlight the photoresist polymer chemistry and processing effects on the final feature fidelity. These physical relations are described in the context of chemically amplified photoresist materials for next-generation photolithography.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Controlled In Situ Nanocavitation in Polymeric Materials (pages 409–413)

      Ya-Jun Cheng, Joseph M. Antonucci, Steven D. Hudson, Nancy J. Lin, Xinran Zhang and Sheng Lin-Gibson

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001755

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      A new strategy to reduce the volume shrinkage of photo-cross-linking polymeric materials using an in situ nanocavitation process has been developed. A small amount of the cavitation agent introduced to a model system effectively reduces volume shrinkage upon photopolymerization to essentially zero. The method shows promise for electronic, coating, and dental applications.

    2. Cubic Silsesquioxanes as a Green, High-Performance Mold Material for Nanoimprint Lithography (pages 414–420)

      Hyun Wook Ro, Vera Popova, Lei Chen, Aaron M. Forster, Yifu Ding, Kyle J. Alvine, Dave J. Krug, Richard M. Laine and Christopher L. Soles

      Article first published online: 16 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001761

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      One-step direct nanoimprinting into cubic-silsesquioxane (SSQ) films create low surface energy, high-modulus, thermally stable, and UV-transparent patterns that can then be used as secondary molds for both thermal and UV versions of nanoimprinting. The optimization of these materials is demonstrated by varying the microstructure of the initial SSQ material. The pattern fidelity for features as small as 10 nm is quantified using X-ray reflectivity and AFM.

    3. Thermodynamic Underpinnings of Cell Alignment on Controlled Topographies (pages 421–425)

      Yifu Ding, Jirun Sun, Hyun Wook Ro, Zhen Wang, Jing Zhou, Nancy J. Lin, Marcus T. Cicerone, Christopher L. Soles and Sheng Lin-Gibson

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001757

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      The initial stages of cell alignment in response to surface topography can be largely described in terms of the work of adhesion encountered by a classical liquid droplet during spreading on a rough surface. This is manifested through a striking correlation between degree of cell alignment and anisotropic wetting of water droplets on the same topographical surfaces.

  8. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Reports
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Interfacial Rheology Through Microfluidics (pages 426–432)

      Jeffrey D. Martin, Joie N. Marhefka, Kalman B. Migler and Steven D. Hudson

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2010 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201001758

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      Using a microfluidic device that facilitates the measure of interfacial tension in two-phase droplet flows, particle tracers are placed inside the droplet phase and the internal circulation velocity is used as a measure of interfacial mobility. Thus interfacial tension, interfacial retardation (Marangoni effects), and surfactant mass transfer can be measured in the same experiment and at industrially relevant size scales and flow types.

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