Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 35

September 15, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 35

Pages 3999–4124

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. Block Copolymers: Piezoelectric Properties of Non-Polar Block Copolymers (Adv. Mater. 35/2011) (page 3999)

      Christian W. Pester, Markus Ruppel, Heiko G. Schoberth, Kristin Schmidt, Clemens Liedel, Patrick van Rijn, Kerstin A. Schindler, Stephanie Hiltl, Thomas Czubak, Jimmy Mays, Volker S. Urban and Alexander Böker

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190137

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An unusually large response of block copolymers to electric fields and its remarkable temperature dependence are reported by Alexander Böker and co-workers on page 4047. Representative small angle X-ray scattering patterns for lamellar block copolymer solutions in the absence (isotropic, dark signal on white background) and presence of an electric field (anisotropic, light on dark) are shown.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. Flexible Electronics: Sub-Micrometer-Thick All-Solid-State Supercapacitors with High Power and Energy Densities (Adv. Mater. 35/2011) (page 4000)

      Fanhui Meng and Yi Ding

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190138

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      Flexible, all-solid-state supercapacitors with sub-micrometer thickness are reported by Yi Ding and co-workers on page 4098. This power source, which is based on a unique nanoporous gold/polypyrrole (NPG-PPy) hybrid nanostructure, demonstrates high volumetric capacitance as well as high power and energy densities, suggesting its potential in powering next-generation wearable and miniaturized electronic devices.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 35/2011) (pages 4001–4006)

      Article first published online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190139

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. One-Dimensional Nanostructures of Ferroelectric Perovskites (pages 4007–4034)

      Per Martin Rørvik, Tor Grande and Mari-Ann Einarsrud

      Article first published online: 28 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201004676

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      Recent progress on nanorods, nanowires, and nanotubes of ferroelectric perovskite oxides is summarized and a critical overview of synthesis routes with emphasis on chemical methods is given. Ferroelectric and piezoelectric properties are discussed and potential applications are highlighted.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    1. Organic Electrochemical Transistors Integrated in Flexible Microfluidic Systems and Used for Label-Free DNA Sensing (pages 4035–4040)

      Peng Lin, Xiaoteng Luo, I-Ming Hsing and Feng Yan

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102017

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      Organic electrochemical transistors are integrated in flexible microfluidic systems. A novel label-free DNA sensor is developed based on the devices with single-stranded DNA probes immobilized on gate electrodes. These devices successfully detect complementary DNA targets at low concentrations using a pulse-enhanced hybridization technique in microfluidic channels. Organic electrochemical transistors are excellent candidates for flexible, highly sensitive, and low-cost biosensors.

    2. Highly Efficient Green and Blue-Green Phosphorescent OLEDs Based on Iridium Complexes with the Tetraphenylimidodiphosphinate Ligand (pages 4041–4046)

      Yu-Cheng Zhu, Liang Zhou, Hong-Yan Li, Qiu-Lei Xu, Ming-Yu Teng, You-Xuan Zheng, Jing-Lin Zuo, Hong-Jie Zhang and Xiao-Zeng You

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101792

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      Two novel bis-cyclometalated iridium complexes are successfully applied in organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). Because of their better carrier transport ability and shorter excited stated lifetimes, good electroluminescence performances of the complexes are observed.

    3. Piezoelectric Properties of Non-Polar Block Copolymers (pages 4047–4052)

      Christian W. Pester, Markus Ruppel, Heiko G. Schoberth, Kristin Schmidt, Clemens Liedel, Patrick van Rijn, Kerstin A. Schindler, Stephanie Hiltl, Thomas Czubak, Jimmy Mays, Volker S. Urban and Alexander Böker

      Article first published online: 4 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102192

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      Piezoelectric properties in non-polar block copolymers are a novelty in the field of electroactive polymers. The piezoelectric susceptibility of poly(styrene-b-isoprene) block copolymer lamellae is found to be up to an order of magnitude higher when compared to classic piezoelectric materials. The electroactive response increases with temperature and is found to be strongest in the disordered phase.

    4. Supramolecular Hydrogel of Bile Salts Triggered by Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (pages 4053–4057)

      Zhenquan Tan, Satoshi Ohara, Makio Naito and Hiroya Abe

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102160

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      A supramolecular hydrogel of bile salts triggered by single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) can be extended 50-fold along the direction of additional stretching force and has excellent viscoelastic properties. The hydrogel is suitable for fabrication of SWCNT-based nanopatterns and devices by a top-down process. The supramolecular hydrogel has the potential for use in rheological materials and in flexible electronics applications.

    5. Temperature-Memory Polymer Networks with Crystallizable Controlling Units (pages 4058–4062)

      Karl Kratz, Samy A. Madbouly, Wolfgang Wagermaier and Andreas Lendlein

      Article first published online: 4 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102225

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      The switching temperature,Tsw, which must be exceeded to initialize a shape-memory effect (SME), and Tσ,max, a temperature related to the recovery stress maximum under constant strain-activation conditions, are adjusted systematically over a wide temperature range for temperature-memory polymers. The polymers are based on crosslinked poly[ethylene-ran-(vinyl acetate)] with crystallizable controlling units and exhibit a broad melting temperature range.

    6. Oxide Double-Layer Nanocrossbar for Ultrahigh-Density Bipolar Resistive Memory (pages 4063–4067)

      Seo Hyoung Chang, Shin Buhm Lee, Dae Young Jeon, So Jung Park, Gyu Tae Kim, Sang Mo Yang, Seung Chul Chae, Hyang Keun Yoo, Bo Soo Kang, Myoung-Jae Lee and Tae Won Noh

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102395

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      A TiO2/VO2 oxide double-layer nanocrossbar to overcome the sneak path problem in bipolar resistive memory is proposed. TiO2 and VO2 thin films function as a bipolar resistive memory and a bidirectional switch, respectively. The new structure suggests that ultrahigh densities can be achieved with a 2D nanocrossbar array layout. By stacking into a 3D structure, the density can be even higher.

    7. A Nanogenerator for Energy Harvesting from a Rotating Tire and its Application as a Self-Powered Pressure/Speed Sensor (pages 4068–4071)

      Youfan Hu, Chen Xu, Yan Zhang, Long Lin, Robert L. Snyder and Zhong Lin Wang

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102067

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nanogenerator is integrated onto a tire's inner surface and scavenges mechanical energy from deformation of the tire during its motion. A liquid crystal display (LCD) screen is lit directly by the nanogenerator. The possibility of scale-up is demonstrated and the potential to use the nanogenerator a self-powered tire pressure sensor and speed detector in mobile vehicles is shown.

    8. “Chemical Blowing” of Thin-Walled Bubbles: High-Throughput Fabrication of Large-Area, Few-Layered BN and Cx-BN Nanosheets (pages 4072–4076)

      Xuebin Wang, Chunyi Zhi, Liang Li, Haibo Zeng, Chun Li, Masanori Mitome, Dmitri Golberg and Yoshio Bando

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101788

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      Mono- and few-atomic-layered BN and Cx-BN nanosheets are fabricated in high yield through the blowing B- and N-containing polymers into large, thin-walled bubbles by chemically released hydrogen gas followed by subsequent annealing.

    9. Chicken Albumen Dielectrics in Organic Field-Effect Transistors (pages 4077–4081)

      Jer-Wei Chang, Cheng-Guang Wang, Chong-Yu Huang, Tzung-Da Tsai, Tzung-Fang Guo and Ten-Chin Wen

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102124

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      The application of the biomaterial dielectrics made of thermally crosslinking natural proteins without any additives in fabricating organic electronics is highlighted. The gate dielectrics of organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are prepared by the thermal treatment of the chicken albumen film taken directly from a fresh egg. Flexible OFETs and the complementary inverters fabricated with albumen dielectrics are demonstrated.

    10. Capsosomes with “Free-Floating” Liposomal Subcompartments (pages 4082–4087)

      Leticia Hosta-Rigau, Shiow Fong Chung, Almar Postma, Rona Chandrawati, Brigitte Städler and Frank Caruso

      Article first published online: 27 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100908

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      Capsosomes, that is, polymer capsules containing liposomal subcompartments, represent a promising new concept towards the design of artificial cells. Herein, capsosomes with control over the position of the subunits, “free-floating” in the capsule interior and/or associated with the polymer membrane, are reported. The functionality of these capsosomes is demonstrated via temperature-triggered encapsulated catalysis using subtilisin.

    11. Reflection Order Selectivity of Color-Tunable Poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) Microgel Based Etalons (pages 4088–4092)

      Courtney D. Sorrell and Michael J. Serpe

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101717

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      The number and order of reflection peaks that a poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) microgel based etalon exhibits can be selected by varying the diameter and/or softness of the microgels that the etalons are constructed from, which affects the dielectric thickness. Larger microgels yield etalons with multiple peaks, while relatively small microgels yield etalons with only one peak. The resulting spectra for each device closely match theoretical predictions.

    12. Organic Semiconductor:Insulator Polymer Ternary Blends for Photovoltaics (pages 4093–4097)

      Toby A. M. Ferenczi, Christian Müller, Donal D. C. Bradley, Paul Smith, Jenny Nelson and Natalie Stingelin

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102100

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ternary blends of poly(3-hexylthiophene): [6,6]-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PC61BM) and the insulating bulk polymers high-density polyethylene (HDPE), isotactic- and atactic polystyrene (i-PS, a-PS), are investigated. Addition of up to ≈50 wt% of the electronically inert, semicrystalline HDPE and i-PS to the organic semiconducting system does not significantly degrade the performance of photovoltaic devices fabricated with these ternary blends.

    13. Sub-Micrometer-Thick All-Solid-State Supercapacitors with High Power and Energy Densities (pages 4098–4102)

      Fanhui Meng and Yi Ding

      Article first published online: 4 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101678

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A sub-micrometer-thick, flexible, all-solid-state supercapacitor is fabricated. Through simultaneous realization of high dispersity of pseudocapacitance materials and quick electrode response, the hybrid nanostructures show enhanced volumetric capacitance and excellent stability, as well as very high power and energy densities. This suggests their potential as next-generation, high-performance energy conversion and storage devices for wearable electronics.

    14. In Situ Neutron Depth Profiling: A Powerful Method to Probe Lithium Transport in Micro-Batteries (pages 4103–4106)

      J. F. M. Oudenhoven, F. Labohm, M. Mulder, R. A. H. Niessen, F. M. Mulder and P. H. L. Notten

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101819

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In situ neutron depth profiling (NDP) offers the possibility to observe lithium transport inside micro-batteries during battery operation. It is demonstrated that NDP results are consistent with the results of electrochemical measurements, and that the use of an enriched 6LiCoO2 cathode offers more insight in transport processes occurring inside all-solid-state thin-film batteries.

    15. Self-Aligned High-Resolution Printed Polymer Transistors (pages 4107–4110)

      Shunpu Li, Weining Chen, Daping Chu and Saibal Roy

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101291

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      A process to fabricate solution-processable thin-film transistors (TFTs) with a one-step self-aligned definition of the dimensions in all functional layers is demonstrated. The TFT-channel, semiconductor materials, and effective gate dimention of different layers are determined by a one-step imprint process and the subsequent pattern transfer without the need for multiple patterning and mask alignment. The process is compatible with fabrication of large-scale circuits.

    16. An Extremely Low Equivalent Magnetic Noise Magnetoelectric Sensor (pages 4111–4114)

      Yaojin Wang, David Gray, David Berry, Junqi Gao, Menghui Li, Jiefang Li and Dwight Viehland

      Article first published online: 29 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100773

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      Extremely low equivalent magnetic noise in a Metglas/piezofiber magnetoelectric (ME) magetic-field sensor, realized through a combination of a giant ME effect and a reduction in constituent internal noise sources, is demonstrated. The ME coefficient is 52 V cm−1 Oe−1 at low frequency, the 1 Hz equivalent magnetic noise is 5.1 pT Hz−1/2, and the magnetic field sensitivity is 10 nT.

    17. ZnO-Microrod/p-GaN Heterostructured Whispering-Gallery-Mode Microlaser Diodes (pages 4115–4119)

      Jun Dai, Chun Xiang Xu and Xiao Wei Sun

      Article first published online: 3 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102184

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      The whispering gallery mode (WGM) lasing and microphotoluminescence from a hexagonal ZnO microrod are investigated. The hexagonal ZnO microrod is integrated on a p-GaN substrate to fabricate a heterostructured microlaser diode and the electrically pumped WGM lasing from the diode is realized.

    18. High Seebeck Effects from Hybrid Metal/Polymer/Metal Thin-Film Devices (pages 4120–4124)

      Liang Yan, Ming Shao, Hsin Wang, Douglas Dudis, Augustine Urbas and Bin Hu

      Article first published online: 2 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101634

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The multi-layer metal/polymer/metal thin-film structure allows charge conduction but limits thermal conduction. The charge conduction is supported by Ohmic interfacial charge transfer and doped bulk transport. The thermal conduction is limited by polymer low thermal conductivity, acoustic mismatch, interfacial phonon scattering. As a result, the metal/polymer/metal thin-film devices can demonstrate significant Seebeck effect.

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