Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 36

September 22, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 36

Pages 4127–4204, H209–H284

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    7. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    8. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    9. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy: Reversible Tuning of SERS Hot Spots with Aptamers (Adv. Mater. 36/2011) (page 4127)

      Nam Hoon Kim, Seung Joon Lee and Martin Moskovits

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190140

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On page 4152, Martin Moskovits and co-workers report a reversible surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-based sensor consisting of gold nanoparticles tethered with stem loop aptamers capable of delivering robust signals from sensing events involving as few as two target molecules. Washing the sensor with buffer causes the SERS spectrum to revert to its pre-detection-event form, fully restoring its capability as a sensor.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    7. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    8. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    9. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Self-Assembly in 3D Using Magnetic Levitation: Using Magnetic Levitation for Three Dimensional Self-Assembly (Adv. Mater. 36/2011) (page 4128)

      Katherine A. Mirica, Filip Ilievski, Audrey K. Ellerbee, Sergey S. Shevkoplyas and George M. Whitesides

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190141

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The image shows three plastic components (cut from a polymethylmethacrylate sheet using a laser cutter to form the letters G, M, and W) levitating in an aqueous solution of MnCl2 between two NdFeB magnets. The letters have a preprogrammed distribution of densi-ties, which is achieved by applying tapes with different densities to their surfaces. As reported by George M. Whitesides and co-workers on page 4134, the balance of magnetic and gravitational forces acting on the letters controls their vertical position and orientation. Digital photography by Emilie Izquierdo.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    7. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    8. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    9. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    7. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    8. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    9. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Using Magnetic Levitation for Three Dimensional Self-Assembly (pages 4134–4140)

      Katherine A. Mirica, Filip Ilievski, Audrey K. Ellerbee, Sergey S. Shevkoplyas and George M. Whitesides

      Version of Record online: 10 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101917

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      Magnetic levitation (MagLev) enables 3D self-assembly of diamagnetic objects with control over many aspects of position and orientation. This work demonstrates the ability of MagLev to position and align components, such as mirrors, filters, lenses, and soft objects, without mechanical support.

    2. Resistive Switching Phenomena in LixCoO2 Thin Films (pages 4141–4145)

      Alec Moradpour, Olivier Schneegans, Sylvain Franger, Alexandre Revcolevschi, Raphaël Salot, Pascale Auban-Senzier, Claude Pasquier, Efthymios Svoukis, John Giapintzakis, Oana Dragos, Vasile-Cristian Ciomaga and Pascal Chrétien

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101800

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      A substantial resistive switching of LixCoO2 mixed-conductor thin films is observed for the first time. The occurrence of possible bipolar switching in these oxide thin films is by current–voltage curves, investigated by conducting-probe atomic force microscopy (CP-AFM). The films are incorporated into an {Au/LixCoO2/p++Si} device and exhibit a significant resistive-switching process involving a ratio of over four orders of magnitude.

    3. Multilevel Information Storage in Ferroelectric Polymer Memories (pages 4146–4151)

      Ashutosh K. Tripathi, Albert J. J. M. van Breemen, Jie Shen, Qi Gao, Marius G. Ivan, Klaus Reimann, Erwin R. Meinders and Gerwin H. Gelinck

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101511

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      Multibit memory devices based on the ferroelectric copolymer P(VDF-TrFE) (poly-(vinylidenefluoride-trifluoroethylene)) are presented. Multilevel microstructures are fabricated by thermal imprinting of spin-coated ferroelectric polymer film using a rigid Si template. Multibit storage in capacitors and thin-film transistor memory is realized by implementing imprinted ferroelectric polymer films as the insulator and gate dielectric layers, respectively.

    4. Reversible Tuning of SERS Hot Spots with Aptamers (pages 4152–4156)

      Nam Hoon Kim, Seung Joon Lee and Martin Moskovits

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101847

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A reversible surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS)-based sensor with stem loop aptamers is reported. It is capable of detecting its target molecule at concentrations below the micromolar level and of delivering robust signals from events involving fewer than ten target molecules. Washing the sensor with buffer causes the SERS spectrum to revert to its pre-detection-event form, fully restoring its capability as a sensor.

    5. Shape-Memory Nanocomposites with Magnetically Adjustable Apparent Switching Temperatures (pages 4157–4162)

      Uttamchand Narendra Kumar, Karl Kratz, Matthias Heuchel, Marc Behl and Andreas Lendlein

      Version of Record online: 5 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102251

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      The apparent switching temperatures (Tsw,app), which need to be exceeded by the environmental temperature (Tenv) to initialize a shape-memory effect (SME) in magnetosensitive dual- or triple-shape composites, are systematically adjusted by application of a constant weak alternating magnetic field. This adaptation of Tsw,app is fully reversible and results from the combination of environmental and inductive heating.

    6. Dimensional Reduction: A Design Tool for New Radiation Detection Materials (pages 4163–4167)

      John Androulakis, Sebastian C. Peter, Hao Li, Christos D. Malliakas, John A. Peters, Zhifu Liu, Bruce W. Wessels, Jung-Hwan Song, Hosub Jin, Arthur J. Freeman and Mercouri G. Kanatzidis

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102450

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      Semiconductor materials for efficient hard radiation detection are identified by combining a powerful chemical concept called dimensional reduction and precise theoretical electronic structure calculations. After more than 50 years of research and development in the field, this constitutes a significant step forward in the search for new detector materials.

    7. Solution Processable and Patternable Poly(3,4-alkylenedioxythiophene)s for Large-Area Electrochromic Films (pages 4168–4173)

      Jeonghun Kim, Jungmok You, Byeonggwan Kim, Teahoon Park and Eunkyoung Kim

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101900

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      Conductivity-controllable and photo-patternable conductive polythiophenes are prepared by solution-casting polymerization and applied to patterned electrochromic devices. A photofunctional group is introduced to thiophene derivatives for color tuning. This method and the resulting materials support the easy fabrication of electrochromic devices for large smart windows or flexible displays with designability and processability.

    8. Optical Interference Lithography Using Azobenzene-Functionalized Polymers for Micro- and Nanopatterning of Silicon (pages 4174–4177)

      Aleksandr Kravchenko, Andriy Shevchenko, Victor Ovchinnikov, Arri Priimagi and Matti Kaivola

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101888

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Light-induced mass transport in azobenzene-functionalized polymers is exploited in optical interference lithography to fabricate large-area, periodic 1D and 2D silicon nanostructures. The demonstrated technique is a fast, reliable, and cost-effective alternative to conventional photoresist-based methods of nano- and microfabrication. Potential applications of the technique range from optics and photonics to functional materials and coatings.

    9. Electrical Characteristics of Molybdenum Disulfide Flakes Produced by Liquid Exfoliation (pages 4178–4182)

      Kangho Lee, Hye-Young Kim, Mustafa Lotya, Jonathan N. Coleman, Gyu-Tae Kim and Georg S. Duesberg

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101013

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Semiconducting 2D MoS2 flakes produced by liquid phase exfoliation are contacted with metal electrodes, which are defined by electron beam lithography. Electrical analysis of the metal–semiconductor–metal structures reveals high mobilities for individual MoS2 flakes. Thus, scalable liquid-phase exfoliation of layered semiconductor compounds can yield novel materials with potential uses in future electronic devices.

    10. p-Type Conduction Characteristics of Lithium-Doped ZnO Nanowires (pages 4183–4187)

      JunSeok Lee, SeungNam Cha, JongMin Kim, HyeWon Nam, SangHyo Lee, WonBae Ko, Kang L. Wang, JeaGun Park and JinPyo Hong

      Version of Record online: 11 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101376

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      p-type ZnO nanowires (NWs) based on a simple hydrothermal technique with a lithium dopant are demonstrated. It is demonstrated that Li substitution of Zn occurrs because of thermally induced migration due to post-annealing in the presence of oxygen. The stable formation of p-type ZnO:Li NWs is revealed using a NW field-effect transistor and a simple n-type ZnO thin film/p-type annealed ZnO:Li NW homojunction diode.

    11. Solvent-Responsive Surface via Wrinkling Instability (pages 4188–4192)

      Hyun Suk Kim and Alfred J. Crosby

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101477

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Solvent-responsive surfaces are fabricated by osmotically-driven wrinkling with hierarchical morphology and controlled wavelength. By taking advantage of reversible wrinkling mechanisms and controlling the region with moduli-mismatch, we demonstrate several applications such as reversible channels, tunable microlens arrays, and guided colloidal pattern formation.

    12. Polarizing Organic Photovoltaics (pages 4193–4198)

      Rui Zhu, Ankit Kumar and Yang Yang

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101514

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      Polarizing organic photovoltaic (ZOPV) technology is demonstrated as a novel concept for energy harvesting and recycling technology. Novel, inverted quasi-bilayer device architecture is utilized to realize the ZOPV device. An anisotropic photovoltaic effect is obtained.

    13. In Situ Gelation of Electrolytes for Highly Efficient Gel-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells (pages 4199–4204)

      Ching-Lun Chen, Hsisheng Teng and Yuh-Lang Lee

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101448

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By using poly(acrylonitrile-co-vinyl acetate) as a gelator in an acetonitrile-based liquid electrolyte, an in situ gelation of the liquid electrolyte can be performed inside the mesoporous matrix of TiO2 films. By introduction of TiO2 nanoparticles as fillers of the gel-electrolyte, the energy conversion efficiency of a gel-state dye-sensitized solar cell can achieve a value higher than that of a liquid-state cell.

  5. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    7. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    8. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    9. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Cancer Therapy: Cancer Nanotheranostics: Improving Imaging and Therapy by Targeted Delivery Across Biological Barriers (Adv. Mater. 36/2011) (page H209)

      Forrest M. Kievit and Miqin Zhang

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190143

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      Cancer nanotheranostics seeks to improve cancer treatment by combining therapy with imaging through nanotechnology. On page H217, Forrest M. Kievit and Miqin Zhang review strategies used to engineer nanotheranostic particles and their use for targeted cancer therapy. Various drug-delivery vehicles such as nanoparticles, adult stem cells, and immune cells can be used to target a cancer cell.

  6. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    7. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    8. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    9. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. “Smart” Capsules for Drug Release: Charge-Shifting Click Capsules with Dual-Responsive Cargo Release Mechanisms (Adv. Mater. 36/2011) (page H210)

      Kang Liang, Georgina K. Such, Zhiyuan Zhu, Yan Yan, Hannah Lomas and Frank Caruso

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190144

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      Triggered release systems based on physiological stimuli have emerged for advanced therapeutic delivery applications. On page H273, Frank Caruso and co-workers combine several independent release mechanisms that synergistically function to tune cargo release profi les. The simple and efficient synthesis allows the design of “smart” capsules with dual stimuliresponsive cargo release mechanisms for therapeutic applications.

  7. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    7. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    8. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    9. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
  8. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    7. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    8. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    9. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
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      The Future of Healthcare (page H215)

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103247

  9. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    7. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    8. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    9. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Cancer Nanotheranostics: Improving Imaging and Therapy by Targeted Delivery Across Biological Barriers (pages H217–H247)

      Forrest M. Kievit and Miqin Zhang

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102313

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Cancer nanotheranostics seeks to improve cancer treatment by combining therapy with imaging through nanotechnology. Researchers are developing next-generation nanomedicines with multiple functionalities for bypassing biological barriers and targeted delivery of therapeutics to diseased cells in order to overcome current challenges in cancer therapy.

  10. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

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    5. Communications
    6. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    7. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
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    9. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
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    1. Enhanced Magnetic Resonance Contrast of Fe3O4 Nanoparticles Trapped in a Porous Silicon Nanoparticle Host (pages H248–H253)

      Joseph M. Kinsella, Shalini Ananda, Jennifer S. Andrew, Joel F. Grondek, Miao-Ping Chien, Miriam Scadeng, Nathan C. Gianneschi, Erkki Ruoslahti and Michael J. Sailor

      Version of Record online: 15 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101877

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      A composite material consisting of Fe3O4 nanoparticles embedded in a 200 nm-diameter porous Si (pSi) nanoparticle “superstructure” is prepared as a potential magnetic resonance imaging contrast agent. Dipolar magnetic coupling between Fe3O4 nanoparticles is enhanced due to their proximity in the pSi host matrix, resulting in an increase in the saturation magnetization and coercivity of the composite.

    2. Multiplexed Magnetic Labeling Amplification Using Oligonucleotide Hybridization (pages H254–H257)

      Monty Liong, Carlos Tassa, Stanley Y. Shaw, Hakho Lee and Ralph Weissleder

      Version of Record online: 22 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101401

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      Oligonucleotide hybridization was used as a cell-labeling method to significantly amplify the loading of magnetic probes onto target cells. The method utilized short oligonucleotides as the binding agents between antibodies and superparamagnetic iron oxide. This method not only enabled multiplexed analysis, but also allowed detection of multiple markers on a single sample containing only scant cell numbers.

    3. Microgels for Efficient Protein Purification (pages H258–H262)

      Boaz Mizrahi, Silvia Irusta, Marshall McKenna, Cristina Stefanescu, Liron Yedidsion, MyatNoeZin Myint, Robert Langer and Daniel S. Kohane

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101258

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      Microgel particles with pore structure and ligands distributed evenly throughout their matrices overcome the major limitations of protein purification systems: low ligand density on the immobilized matrix and protein access to those ligands. A straightforward synthetic scheme for a highly efficient microgel matrix is reported.

    4. Enhanced Differentiation of Human Neural Stem Cells into Neurons on Graphene (pages H263–H267)

      Sung Young Park, Jaesung Park, Sung Hyun Sim, Moon Gyu Sung, Kwang S. Kim, Byung Hee Hong and Seunghun Hong

      Version of Record online: 8 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101503

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      Graphene-substrate-promoted human neural stem cell adhesion and its differentiation into neurons is reported. Microarray studies were performed to explore plausible explanation for this effect. Further, an electrical stimulation on differentiated cells via graphene electrodes is demonstrated.

    5. Highly Conformable Conducting Polymer Electrodes for In Vivo Recordings (pages H268–H272)

      Dion Khodagholy, Thomas Doublet, Moshe Gurfinkel, Pascale Quilichini, Esma Ismailova, Pierre Leleux, Thierry Herve, Sébastien Sanaur, Christophe Bernard and George G. Malliaras

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102378

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A photolithographic process was used to integrate the conducting polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) with parylene C, yielding highly conformable electrode arrays that were only four micrometers thick (shown here to conform to the midrib of a small leaf). The arrays were sufficiently self-supporting to allow in vivo evaluation in rats, yielding high-quality electrocorticography recordings.

    6. Charge-Shifting Click Capsules with Dual-Responsive Cargo Release Mechanisms (pages H273–H277)

      Kang Liang, Georgina K. Such, Zhiyuan Zhu, Yan Yan, Hannah Lomas and Frank Caruso

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101690

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The assembly of responsive layer-by-layer-assembled click polymer capsules that exhibit dual-responsive cargo release mechanisms for the controlled release of cargo is reported. The capsules show reversible size changes between pH 6 and 7.4. The synergistic effects of pH and redox-potential allow for rapid and efficient cargo release at simulated intracellular conditions.

    7. E-Selectin-Targeted Porous Silicon Particle for Nanoparticle Delivery to the Bone Marrow (pages H278–H282)

      Aman P. Mann, Takemi Tanaka, Anoma Somasunderam, Xuewu Liu, David G. Gorenstein and Mauro Ferrari

      Version of Record online: 11 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101541

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A multifunctional drug delivery system is developed comprising biodegradable porous silicon microparticles that act as motherships to ferry different types of imaging and therapeutic nanoparticles loaded within their porous structure. An E-selectin thioaptamer ligand is used to actively target this delivery system to the bone marrow vasculature where the payload is released as the porous silicon underwent degradation under physiological conditions.

  11. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Communications
    6. Cover Picture “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    7. Inside Front Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    8. Contents “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    9. Editorial “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    10. Review “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    11. Communications “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    12. Back Cover “Advanced Healthcare Materials”
    1. Site-Specific Drug Delivery: E-Selectin-Targeted Porous Silicon Particle for Nanoparticle Delivery to the Bone Marrow (Adv. Mater. 36/2011) (page H284)

      Aman P. Mann, Takemi Tanaka, Anoma Somasunderam, Xuewu Liu, David G. Gorenstein and Mauro Ferrari

      Version of Record online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190146

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The application of a multistage drug-delivery system comprising biodegradable nanoporous silicon particles that allow for a site-specific delivery of different imaging or therapeutic nanoparticles is presented by Mauro Ferrari and co-workers on page H278. The image shows a silicon particle that releases a therapeutic payload into bone marrow tissue.

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