Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 38

October 11, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 38

Pages 4335–4457

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essays
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    1. Nanoscale Topography: Aptamer-Mediated Efficient Capture and Release of T Lymphocytes on Nanostructured Surfaces (Adv. Mater. 38/2011) (page 4335)

      Li Chen, Xueli Liu, Bin Su, Jing Li, Lei Jiang, Dong Han and Shutao Wang

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190151

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      Easy capture and easy release! The cover illustrates a nanostructured platform that combines silicon nanowire arrays and targeted DNA aptamers, realizing significant capture and efficient release of T lymphocytes. This method of capture and release provides an artful strategy to fulfill the demands of cell isolation and diagnostics, as reported by Dong Han, Shutao Wang, and co-workers on page 4376.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essays
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    1. Superhydrophobic Materials: Overcoming The Water Vulnerability Of Electronic Devices: A Highly Water-Resistant ZnO Nanodevice With Multifunctionality (Adv. Mater. 38/2011) (page 4336)

      Seunghyup Lee, Wooseok Kim and Kijung Yong

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190152

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      Water-resistant electronic devices are developed based on superhydrophobic nanostructures. A ZnO resistive switching device is tested as a model system. As reported on page 4398 by Kijung Yong and co-workers, the application of superhydrophobic nanostructures on device surfaces efficiently blocks the direct contact of water with electronic components and the devices work even when water is poured on the surface of the device.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essays
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
  4. Essays

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essays
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      A Brief Guide to Designing Effective Figures for the Scientific Paper (pages 4343–4346)

      Marco Rolandi, Karen Cheng and Sarah Pérez-Kriz

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102518

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      Figures are an essential part of the scientific paper. Scientists often learn how to create figures by trial and error. A scientist, a graphic designer, and a cognitive psychologist have teamed up to write a brief guide to ease this process. This guide, aimed at researchers in scientific fields, provides an easy-to-follow set of instructions to design effective figures.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essays
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    1. Thienoacene-Based Organic Semiconductors (pages 4347–4370)

      Kazuo Takimiya, Shoji Shinamura, Itaru Osaka and Eigo Miyazaki

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102007

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      Thienoacene-based organic semiconductors consisting of fused thiophene rings in a ladder-type molecular structure are reviewed. The implications of molecular structure in the transport properties in organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) are discussed on a molecular level, including the solid-state electronic structure and the packing structure in the solid state.

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essays
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    1. Efficient Organic Solar Cells with Solution-Processed Silver Nanowire Electrodes (pages 4371–4375)

      Dong-Seok Leem, Angharad Edwards, Mark Faist, Jenny Nelson, Donal D. C. Bradley and John C. de Mello

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100871

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      An effective method for reducing interelectrode shorting in silver nanowire (AgNW) based organic solar cells is reported. The method is applied to standard and inverted devices based on poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester. The best results are obtained using an inverted architecture with a 200 nm buffer layer of nanostructured titania (TiOx) on top of the AgNWs, yielding power conversion efficiencies of up to 3.5%.

    2. Aptamer-Mediated Efficient Capture and Release of T Lymphocytes on Nanostructured Surfaces (pages 4376–4380)

      Li Chen, Xueli Liu, Bin Su, Jing Li, Lei Jiang, Dong Han and Shutao Wang

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102435

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A nanostructured platform that combines silicon nanowire arrays and DNA aptamers realizes significant capture and efficient release of T lymphocytes. An approximately two orders of magnitude enhancement in capture efficiency compared to planar surfaces is observed with good release performance. This method of capture and release provides an artful strategy to fulfill the demands of cell isolation and diagnosis.

    3. Nanocone Tip–Film Solar Cells with Efficient Charge Transport (pages 4381–4385)

      Sang Hyun Lee, X.-G. Zhang, Chad M. Parish, Ho Nyung Lee, D. Barton Smith, Yongning He and Jun Xu

      Article first published online: 26 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101655

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      A nanojunction solar cell consisting of ZnO nanocone tips embedded in a polycrystalline CdTe film is reported. This tip–film structure shows higher conversion efficiency than its planar structure. The higher efficiency is attributable to more efficient charge transport in the nanojunction due to a unique electric field distrobution in the CdTe and the utilization of the small junction area.

    4. A Graphene–Conjugated Oligomer Hybrid Probe for Light-Up Sensing of Lectin and Escherichia Coli (pages 4386–4391)

      Lihua Wang, Kan-Yi Pu, Jing Li, Xiaoying Qi, Hai Li, Hua Zhang, Chunhai Fan and Bin Liu

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102227

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      A water-soluble neutral fluorescent conjugated oligomer (FBT) is integrated with graphene oxide (GO) to form a hybrid nanoprobe with extremely low fluorescence background due to the robust quenching capability of GO. The contact between GO and FBT can be effectively shielded by Concanavalin A because of the strong specific protein–carbohydrate interaction, which ultimately allows for light-up visual detection of lectin and Escherichia coli.

    5. Transfer-Free Growth of Few-Layer Graphene by Self-Assembled Monolayers (pages 4392–4397)

      Hyeon-Jin Shin, Won Mook Choi, Seon-Mi Yoon, Gang Hee Han, Yun Sung Woo, Eun Sung Kim, Seung Jin Chae, Xiang-Shu Li, Anass Benayad, Duong Dinh Loc, Fethullah Gunes, Young Hee Lee and Jae-Young Choi

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102526

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      Graphene layers are directly synthesizedon an oxide substrate without transfer. The catalytic structure aids graphene formation without the vaporization of a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) material and induces direct growth of graphene on the substrate. Film uniformity and the number of graphene layers are modulated. The catalytic structure and growth process provide a robust method for transfer-free graphene growth with uniform thickness.

    6. Overcoming The Water Vulnerability Of Electronic Devices: A Highly Water-Resistant ZnO Nanodevice With Multifunctionality (pages 4398–4402)

      Seunghyup Lee, Wooseok Kim and Kijung Yong

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101580

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Water-resistant electronic devices are developed based on superhydrophobic nanostructures. A ZnO resistive switching device is tested as a model system. The application of superhydrophobic nanostructures on device surfaces efficiently blocks the direct contact of water with electronic components and the devices work even when water is poured on the surface of the device.

    7. Electronic Control of Cell Detachment Using a Self-Doped Conducting Polymer (pages 4403–4408)

      Kristin M. Persson, Roger Karlsson, Karl Svennersten, Susanne Löffler, Edwin W. H. Jager, Agneta Richter-Dahlfors, Peter Konradsson and Magnus Berggren

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101724

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      An electronic detachment technology based on thin films of a poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) derivative is evaluated for controlled release of human epithelial cells. When applying a potential of 1 V, the redox-responsive polymer films detach and disintegrate and at the same time release cells cultured on top in the absence of any enzymatic treatment with excellent preservation of membrane proteins and cell viability.

    8. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Hydride Formation in Single Palladium and Magnesium Nanoparticles Studied By Nanoplasmonic Dark-Field Scattering Spectroscopy (pages 4409–4414)

      Timur Shegai and Christoph Langhammer

      Article first published online: 5 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101976

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      Scrutinizing functional nanosystems and relating details in their size, chemistry, and geometry to functionality remains a significant experimental challenge. Following the concept of indirect nanoplasmonic sensing (INPS), the exploitation of truncated Au nanocones with functionalized tips, nanofabricated in a one step, are used as single nanoplasmonic sensors for dark-field scattering spectroscopy measurements of the hydride formation in single Pd and Mg nanoparticles.

    9. Cu-Si Nanocable Arrays as High-Rate Anode Materials for Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 4415–4420)

      Fei-Fei Cao, Jun-Wen Deng, Sen Xin, Heng-Xing Ji, Oliver G. Schmidt, Li-Jun Wan and Yu-Guo Guo

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102062

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      Well-organized Si-Cu nanocables are directly anchored on a current collector to promote the cycling stability and high rate capability of Si as a superior anode in lithium-ion batteries.

  7. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essays
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    1. Flexible Plasmonics: Flexible Plasmonics on Unconventional and Nonplanar Substrates (Adv. Mater. 38/2011) (page 4421)

      Serap Aksu, Min Huang, Alp Artar, Ahmet A. Yanik, Selvapraba Selvarasah, Mehmet R. Dokmeci and Hatice Altug

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190154

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      Flexible plasmonics on polymeric and non-planar substrates are demonstrated using nanostencil lithography. Remarkable precision with 10-nm accuracy is illustrated by fabricating sub-100 nm plasmonic particles with sub-50 nm interparticle distances. Hatice Altug and coworkers show optical tuning with mechanical stretching of polymer substrate and demonstrate nanopatterning on curved surfaces including optical fibers.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Essays
    6. Review
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    1. Flexible Plasmonics on Unconventional and Nonplanar Substrates (pages 4422–4430)

      Serap Aksu, Min Huang, Alp Artar, Ahmet A. Yanik, Selvapraba Selvarasah, Mehmet R. Dokmeci and Hatice Altug

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102430

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      Flexible plasmonics and metamaterials on polymeric and nonplanar substrates are demonstrated using nanostencil lithography. High-resolution fabrication with 10 nm accuracy is achieved at high throughput and low cost in a single fabrication step. Optical tuning is shown with mechanical stretching of the polymer substrate. Patterning of nanostructures on curved surfaces, including optical fibers, is demonstrated.

    2. Tailored Microcrystal Growth: A Facile Solution-Phase Synthesis of Gold Rings (pages 4431–4434)

      Hyojong Yoo, Jaswinder Sharma, Jin Kyung Kim, Andrew P. Shreve and Jennifer S. Martinez

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101455

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      Crystallographically oriented triangular or hexagonal Au rings with micrometer-scale edge lengths and nanoscale thicknesses are successfully synthesized in aqueous solution. By using a Au3+ precursor and commercially available neutral polymeric surfactant ((C2H4O)23C12H25OH, Brij35), Au rings are generated in a single-step, one-pot synthesis.

    3. Dynamic Covalent Chemistry on Surfaces Employing Highly Reactive Cyclopentadienyl Moieties (pages 4435–4439)

      James P. Blinco, Vanessa Trouillet, Michael Bruns, Peter Gerstel, Hartmut Gliemann and Christopher Barner-Kowollik

      Article first published online: 23 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102875

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      Silicon substrates coated with a bromide-terminated silane are transformed into highly reactive, cyclopentadiene covered analogues. These surfaces undergo rapid cycloaddition reactions with various dienophile-capped polymers. Mild heating of the substrates causes the retro-Diels–Alder reaction to occur, thus reforming the reactive cyclopentadiene surface, generating an efficiently switchable surface.

    4. Radical Polymer-Wrapped SWNTs at a Molecular Level: High-Rate Redox Mediation Through a Percolation Network for a Transparent Charge-Storage Material (pages 4440–4443)

      Wonsung Choi, Shota Ohtani, Kenichi Oyaizu, Hiroyuki Nishide and Kurt E. Geckeler

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102372

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      A transparent nanocomposite of a radical polymer, the poly(2,2,6,6-tetramethylpiperidine-1-oxy-4-yl methacrylate) (PTMA), and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) display a reversible charging and discharging, allowing for full discharging in seconds. This is ascribed to the reversible electrochemical reaction of the pendant radical group in PTMA aided by both PTMA wrapping at a molecular level and the SWNT network for electrical conduction.

    5. Continuous Patterning of Nanogratings by Nanochannel-Guided Lithography on Liquid Resists (pages 4444–4448)

      Jong G. Ok, Hui Joon Park, Moon Kyu Kwak, Carlos A. Pina-Hernandez, Se Hyun Ahn and L. Jay Guo

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102199

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      A nanochannel-guided lithography technique is developed that achieves continuous fabrication of higher aspect-ratio nanograting structures by adopting a cross-linkable liquid resist coating. Under the guidance of nanochannels in the grating mold, the UV-curable liquid resist is smoothly extruded and self-stabilized along the slightly inscribed solid substrate, dictated by the resist wettability to the substrate as well as the substrate topography.

    6. Fabrication of Metal-Organic Framework-Containing Silica-Colloidal Crystals for Vapor Sensing (pages 4449–4452)

      Guang Lu, Omar K. Farha, Lauren E. Kreno, Paul M. Schoenecker, Krista S. Walton, Richard P. Van Duyne and Joseph T. Hupp

      Article first published online: 19 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102116

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      By combining metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with colloidal crystals, the challenge of signal transduction in response to molecular sorption by MOF materials can be met for sensing applications. HKUST-1 (Cu2(BTC)3) is grown on a silica colloidal crystal thin film via a step-by-step technique, and the obtained MOF-containing colloidal crystal is rapidly and reversibly responsive to vapor or gas molecules adsorbed by the MOF component.

    7. Silver Nanowire-Polymer Composite Electrodes for Efficient Polymer Solar Cells (pages 4453–4457)

      Zhibin Yu, Lu Li, Qingwu Zhang, Weili Hu and Qibing Pei

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101992

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      Polymer solar cells are fabricated on a silver nanowire-polymer composite electrode. The power conversion efficiency based on a blend of poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) and phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) is comparable to control devices with indium tin oxide (ITO)–glass electrodes. The devices are highly flexible and can be bent to a maximum 8% strain with negligible damage to device efficiency.

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