Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 41

November 2, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 41

Pages 4719–4814

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Organic Electronics: Controlling the Dimensionality of Charge Transport in an Organic Electrochemical Transistor by Capacitive Coupling (Adv. Mater. 41/2011) (page 4719)

      Oscar Larsson, Ari Laiho, Wolfgang Schmickler, Magnus Berggren and Xavier Crispin

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190163

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      The dimensionality of charge transport (2D versus 3D) in an organic electrochemical transistor depends on the degree of advancement of the electrochemical half-reaction in the organic semi-conductor, which is here governed only by capaci-tive coupling. As reported by Xavier Crispin and co-workers on page 4764, such a transistor with a carbon nanotube network as the gate electrode leads to a bulk transport in the semiconductor.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Nanofiber Ink: A Chitin Nanofiber Ink for Airbrushing, Replica Molding, and Microcontact Printing of Self-assembled Macro-, Micro-, and Nanostructures (Adv. Mater. 41/2011) (page 4720)

      Chao Zhong, Adnan Kapetanovic, Yingxin Deng and Marco Rolandi

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190164

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-assembled chitin nanofibers are microcontact printed onto a glass substrate. Ultrafine nanofibers self-assemble from a hexafluoro-2-propanol chitin solution upon drying. On page 4776, Marco Rolandi and co-workers use this “chitin nanofiber ink” for airbrushing, replica molding, and micro-contact printing of chitin nanofiber structures across length scales. Notably, sub-35 nm micro-contact printed nanofiber features are achieved.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 41/2011) (pages 4721–4724)

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190161

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Organic Photorefractive Materials and Applications (pages 4725–4763)

      Sebastian Köber, Michael Salvador and Klaus Meerholz

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201100436

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      Organic photorefractive materials are rewritable media capable of storing holograms as light induced refractive index change. This review compares material approaches to the photorefractive effect and provides an overview on recent developments with emphasis on organic polymer composites and low-molecular weight glasses. Applications based on the unique properties of organic photorefractive materials are introduced and discussed.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Controlling the Dimensionality of Charge Transport in an Organic Electrochemical Transistor by Capacitive Coupling (pages 4764–4769)

      Oscar Larsson, Ari Laiho, Wolfgang Schmickler, Magnus Berggren and Xavier Crispin

      Article first published online: 27 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103131

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The dimensionality of charge transport in an organic electrochemical transistor depends on the degree of advancement of the electrochemical half-reaction at the organic semiconductor/electrolyte interface. A carbon nanotube (CNT) nanoporous gate electrode leads to bulk transport in the semiconductor, while a flat Au gate electrode allows for localizing of the electrochemical oxidation of the semiconducting polymer at the organic semiconductor/electrolyte interface.

    2. Multimodal Nanodiamond Drug Delivery Carriers for Selective Targeting, Imaging, and Enhanced Chemotherapeutic Efficacy (pages 4770–4775)

      Xue-Qing Zhang, Robert Lam, Xiaoyang Xu, Edward K. Chow, Ho-Joong Kim and Dean Ho

      Article first published online: 20 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102263

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Multimodal nanodiamonds (NDs) were prepared by attaching fluorescently labeled drug-oligonucleotide conjugates and monoclonal antibodies onto the ND surface. Fluorescently labeled oligonucleotide linkers enabled the intracellular observation and quantification of resultant ND conjugates. The covalent attachment of the chemotherapeutic and targeting moiety to the ND surface significantly enhanced cellular internalization and therapeutic activity

    3. A Chitin Nanofiber Ink for Airbrushing, Replica Molding, and Microcontact Printing of Self-assembled Macro-, Micro-, and Nanostructures (pages 4776–4781)

      Chao Zhong, Adnan Kapetanovic, Yingxin Deng and Marco Rolandi

      Article first published online: 22 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102639

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A chitin nanofiber ink affords facile fabrication of chitin macro- and nanostructures through airbrushing, replica molding, and microcontact printing. Self-assembled chitin nanofiber structures with sub 50 nm features are produced on extended areas.

    4. Nanoimprinting by Melt Processing: An Easy Technique to Fabricate Versatile Nanostructures (pages 4782–4787)

      Jayan Thomas, Palash Gangopadhyay, Emre Araci, Robert A. Norwood and Nasser Peyghambarian

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102834

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Insights gained from rheological and contact angle measurements of plasticized and non-plasticized polymers have led to the development of a simple method to print densely packed micro- and nanoscale features without proximity effects. Versatile large-area nanopatterns and landscapes with a high degree of fidelity are successfully imprinted. This technique promises a variety of polymer nanostructures to a wide spectrum of scientific fields.

    5. Functionalized Conducting Polymer Nanodots for Enhanced Cell Capturing: The Synergistic Effect of Capture Agents and Nanostructures (pages 4788–4792)

      Jun Sekine, Shyh-Chyang Luo, Shutao Wang, Bo Zhu, Hsian-Rong Tseng and Hsiao-hua Yu

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102151

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      Nanostructured conducting polymer nanodots are prepared by electropolymerization of carboxylic acid group functionalized monomer in dichloromethane directly onto substrates. They demonstrate enhanced yields for the capture of tumor cells compared to smooth surfaces due to a synergistic effect of the capture agents and nanostructures.

    6. Multicore Assemblies Potentiate Magnetic Properties of Biomagnetic Nanoparticles (pages 4793–4797)

      Tae-Jong Yoon, Hakho Lee, Huilin Shao, Scott A. Hilderbrand and Ralph Weissleder

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102948

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly potent magnetic nanomaterials are developed by encasing multiple magnetic cores inside a thin silica shell, in much the same way as the pomegranate fruit contains many seeds within a thin skin. This construct not only produces materials that are biocompatible but also ones that reach theoretically maximum transverse relaxivity.

    7. The Synthesis and Coating of Long, Thin Copper Nanowires to Make Flexible, Transparent Conducting Films on Plastic Substrates (pages 4798–4803)

      Aaron R. Rathmell and Benjamin J. Wiley

      Article first published online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102284

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Solution-processable transparent electrodes will facilitate the high-throughput production of low-cost photovoltaics. Copper nanowires are coated from solution onto plastic substrates to create high-performance, transparent conducting films that are highly flexible, stable in air, and can carry large currents.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Biomedical Applications: Multifunctional Cationic Poly(p-phenylene vinylene) Polyelectrolytes for Selective Recognition, Imaging, and Killing of Bacteria Over Mammalian Cells (Adv. Mater. 41/2011) (page 4804)

      Chunlei Zhu, Qiong Yang, Libing Liu, Fengting Lv, Shayu Li, Guoqiang Yang and Shu Wang

      Article first published online: 25 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190162

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new multifunctional cationic poly(p-phenylene vinylene) derivative with polyethylene glycol (PEG) side chains is designed to combine recognition, imaging, and killing functions into a single system to achieve a collaborative and selective antimicrobial effect. As reported by Qiong Yang, Shu Wang, and co-workers, this new strategy will exert a far-reaching impact on the future development of antimicrobial materials, exhibiting potential applications in pathogen infections and medical implants.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Multifunctional Cationic Poly(p-phenylene vinylene) Polyelectrolytes for Selective Recognition, Imaging, and Killing of Bacteria Over Mammalian Cells (pages 4805–4810)

      Chunlei Zhu, Qiong Yang, Libing Liu, Fengting Lv, Shayu Li, Guoqiang Yang and Shu Wang

      Article first published online: 21 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102850

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A multifunctional cationic poly(p-phenylene vinylene) derivate with polyethylene glycol (PEG) side chains is used for selective recognition, imaging, and killing of bacteria over mammalian cells. This material exerts a far-reaching impact on the future development of antimicrobial materials and has potential applications in pathogen infections and medical implants.

    2. Near-Infrared Light Emission from a GaN/Si Nanoheterostructure Array (pages 4811–4814)

      Chang Bao Han, Chuan He and Xin Jian Li

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101801

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A near-infrared (NIR) light-emitting diode is fabricated by constructing a GaN/Si nanoheterostructure array by growing GaN nanograins onto a silicon nanoporous pillar array (Si-NPA). A strong and tunable NIR electroluminescence is observed and the luminescent mechanism is attributed to the carrier radiative recombination occurring at the interface between GaN and Si-NPA.

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