Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 43

November 16, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 43

Pages 4967–5112

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Supramolecular Materials: Aligned Macroscopic Domains of Optoelectronic Nanostructures Prepared via Shear-Flow Assembly of Peptide Hydrogels (Adv. Mater. 43/2011) (page 4967)

      Brian D. Wall, Stephen R. Diegelmann, Shuming Zhang, Thomas J. Dawidczyk, William L. Wilson, Howard E. Katz, Hai-Quan Mao and John D. Tovar

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190172

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      An assembly process whereby solutions of π-conjugated peptide molecules are fashioned into macroscale hydrogel noodles through a simple solution dispensing technique is reported by John D. Tovar and co-workers on page 5009. This method allows one-step manipulation of molecular species into 1D nanostructures that are themselves globally aligned within the noodle architecture. Art-work by Shawna Garcia.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Graphene Transistors for Bioelectronics: Graphene Transistor Arrays for Recording Action Potentials from Electrogenic Cells (Adv. Mater. 43/2011) (page 4968)

      Lucas H. Hess, Michael Jansen, Vanessa Maybeck, Moritz V. Hauf, Max Seifert, Martin Stutzmann, Ian D. Sharp, Andreas Offenhäusser and Jose A. Garrido

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190173

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      A living cell is cultured on top of a graphene solution-gated field effect transistor (FET) and the cell action potential is detected with the transistor. As reported by Jose A. Garrido and co-workers on page 5045, arrays of graphene solution-gated FETs can be successfully used to record the electrical activity of living cells, demonstrating superior per-formance for bioelectronic applications.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 43/2011) (pages 4969–4975)

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190169

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Strategies for the Fabrication of Porous Platinum Electrodes (pages 4976–5008)

      Arne Kloke, Felix von Stetten, Roland Zengerle and Sven Kerzenmacher

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102182

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      Porous platinum electrodes bringing together high catalytic activity and high surface area have become integral parts of various applications such as fuel cells or sensors. This article discusses strengths and weaknesses of fabrication techniques for substrate-based electrodes (e.g., by electrodeposition), self-supporting electrodes (e.g., by dealloying) as well as nanoparticle based fabrication and approaches for platinum decoration of other conducting porous materials.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Aligned Macroscopic Domains of Optoelectronic Nanostructures Prepared via Shear-Flow Assembly of Peptide Hydrogels (pages 5009–5014)

      Brian D. Wall, Stephen R. Diegelmann, Shuming Zhang, Thomas J. Dawidczyk, William L. Wilson, Howard E. Katz, Hai-Quan Mao and John D. Tovar

      Article first published online: 5 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102963

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A facile technique is reported to prepare globally aligned arrays of self-assembled peptide nanostructures within macroscopic hydrogels starting from a solution of peptide molecules with embedded π-conjugated oligomers. The alignment of the π-stacked conduits within these macrostructures is verified with polarized optical microscopy and leads to anisotropic photophysical and electrical properties.

    2. Mesoporous Metal-Organic Frameworks with Size-tunable Cages: Selective CO2 Uptake, Encapsulation of Ln3+ Cations for Luminescence, and Column-Chromatographic Dye Separation (pages 5015–5020)

      Ya-Qian Lan, Hai-Long Jiang, Shun-Li Li and Qiang Xu

      Article first published online: 11 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102880

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      Three mesoporous metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) with rare corundum-type topology and size-tailored cages are constructed by length-extendable tetratopic ligands. All the MOFs show selective CO2 uptake over N2 and their CO2 uptake capabilities are discriminated with different cage sizes. The MOFs can serve as hosts for encapsulating extra-framework lanthanide cations, and be applicable in column-chromatographic separation for large dye molecules.

    3. Hybrid Magnetic/Superconducting Materials Obtained by Insertion of a Single-Molecule Magnet into TaS2 Layers (pages 5021–5026)

      Eugenio Coronado, Carlos Martí-Gastaldo, Efrén Navarro-Moratalla, Enrique Burzurí, Agustín Camón and Fernando Luis

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102730

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      A material in which superconducting and magnetic properties coexist is synthesized by the intercalation of single-molecule magnets into the layered structure of a group V metal dichalcogenide. A molecule-based/solid-state hybrid strategy is here employed, proving as a promising chemical approach for preparing new materials in which superconductivity coexists with different molecule-intrinsic functionalities.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Microcontact Printing: Interfacial Thermal Conductance of Transfer-Printed Metal Films (Adv. Mater. 43/2011) (page 5027)

      Dong-Wook Oh, Seok Kim, John A. Rogers, David G. Cahill and Sanjiv Sinha

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190170

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      Transfer printing enables heterogeneous integration of materials on large area substrates. As reported by David G. Cahill and co-workers, an ultrafast laser is used to pump and probe heat con-duction at the interface formed by transfer printed Au and Au(Pd) films on various substrates. The interface conductance is orders of magnitude larger than macroscopic pressed contacts and approaches that of physical vapor deposited films.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Interfacial Thermal Conductance of Transfer-Printed Metal Films (pages 5028–5033)

      Dong-Wook Oh, Seok Kim, John A. Rogers, David G. Cahill and Sanjiv Sinha

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102994

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      The thermal conductance of transfer-printed interfaces is found to be surprisingly high, only a factor of 2–10 smaller than the thermal conductance of interfaces formed by physical vapor deposition. These results have practical importance for the thermal management of electronic devices assembled by transfer-printing and provide fundamental insights on the nature of solid-solid contacts between elastically stiff materials.

    2. Efficient Delivery of Gold Nanoparticles by Dual Receptor Targeting (pages 5034–5038)

      Sanjib Bhattacharyya, Jameel Ahmad Khan, Geoffry L. Curran, J. David Robertson, Resham Bhattacharya and Priyabrata Mukherjee

      Article first published online: 4 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102287

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      The fabrication and characterization of a dual receptor targeted system (DRTS) are described. It is demonstrated that DRTS is more efficient at delivering gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) to ovarian cancer cells expressing epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and folate receptor (FR) than their corresponding single-receptor-targeting systems (SRTS).

    3. A Versatile Nanopatterning Technique Based on Controlled Undercutting and Liftoff (pages 5039–5044)

      Mark C. Rosamond, Andrew J. Gallant, Michael C. Petty, Oleg Kolosov and Dagou A. Zeze

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102708

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      A new low-cost top-down nanolithography technique based on controlled undercutting and liftoff is reported. The method is applicable to a wide selection of inorganic materials (those that can be patterned by dry etching or lift-off) and can create 100-nm sized structures over wafer-sized areas. The method requires only conventional microfabrication processes and is ideal for producing nanowires, rings, and dots. A proof-of-concept experiment is also described for the fabrication of gold-nanowire transparent conducting electrodes, which show excellent optoelectronic properties.

    4. Graphene Transistor Arrays for Recording Action Potentials from Electrogenic Cells (pages 5045–5049)

      Lucas H. Hess, Michael Jansen, Vanessa Maybeck, Moritz V. Hauf, Max Seifert, Martin Stutzmann, Ian D. Sharp, Andreas Offenhäusser and Jose A. Garrido

      Article first published online: 26 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102990

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Arrays of graphene solution-gated field-effect transistors are fabricated for the detection of electrical activity of electrogenic cells. Cardiomyocyte-like cells are cultured on the transistor arrays and their action potentials are detected by the underlying transistors. The analysis of the recorded cell signals and the electronic noise of the transistors confirm that graphene transistors surpass state-of-the-art devices for bioelectronic applications.

    5. Micrometer-Sized, Nanoporous, High-Volumetric-Capacity LiMn0.85Fe0.15PO4 Cathode Material for Rechargeable Lithium-Ion Batteries (pages 5050–5054)

      Yang-Kook Sun, Seung-Min Oh, Hong-Kyu Park and Bruno Scrosati

      Article first published online: 30 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102497

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      Micrometer-sized LiMn0.85Fe0.15PO4 particles with a unique morphology and high tap density were synthesized via co-precipitation. The micro-LiMn0.85Fe0.15PO4 electrode resulted in 1.4 times greater volumetric energy density compared to the conventional nano-LiMn0.85Fe0.15PO4 electrode.

    6. Photocurable Liquid Core–Fugitive Shell Printing of Optical Waveguides (pages 5055–5058)

      David J. Lorang, Douglas Tanaka, Christopher M. Spadaccini, Klint A. Rose, Nerine J. Cherepy and Jennifer A. Lewis

      Article first published online: 12 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102411

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      OrmoClear waveguides are patterned by direct-write assembly of a photocurable liquid core encapsulated by a fugitive viscoelastic shell. Straight, curved, and out-of-plane waveguides can be patterned by this approach. Optical waveguide networks coupled to multiple LEDs are demonstrated.

    7. Core/Sheath Organic Nanocable Constructed with a Master–Slave Molecular Pair for Optically Switched Memories (pages 5059–5063)

      Gang Xu, Qing-Dan Yang, Feng-Yun Wang, Wen-Feng Zhang, Yong-Bing Tang, Ning-Bew Wong, Shuit-Tong Lee, Wen-Jun Zhang and Chun-Sing Lee

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102892

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      An organic photochromic material and an organic semiconducting material are combined to produce a “master–slave-type” core/sheath nanocable material in which by switching the photochromic master sheath, the electrical conductance and fluorescence of the semiconducting slave core material can be reversibly tuned. With such nanocables, non-volatile memory devices with both optical and electrical readouts are demonstrated.

    8. Continuous Direct Spinning of Fibers of Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with Metallic Chirality (pages 5064–5068)

      Rajyashree M. Sundaram, Krzysztof K. K. Koziol and Alan H. Windle

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102754

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      The electrical properties of single-walled carbon nanotubes depend critically on their structure. Using a method for spinning of nanotube based fibers directly from the synthesis reaction zone, the critical control of sulfur precursors in the reaction allows the production of a fiber consisting of single-walled carbon nanotubes with the same, sought after metallic properties, and chiral angle.

    9. Directing Dynamic Control of Red, Green, and Blue Reflection Enabled by a Light-Driven Self-Organized Helical Superstructure (pages 5069–5073)

      Quan Li, Yannian Li, Ji Ma, Deng-Ke Yang, Timothy J. White and Timothy J. Bunning

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103362

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      Two light-driven chiral molecular switches possessing very high helical twisting powers were introduced into an achiral liquid crystal host enabling a self-organized, tunable helical superstructure. Marrying reflection wavelength to the wavelength of irradiation offers a distinctive and novel means to simultaneously achieve red, green, and blue reflection colors in a single optical thin film. Photoaddressing of the material system allows for images to be retained, which are hidden with an applied electrical field and restored by application of a mechanical field.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Organic Field-Effect Transistors: High-Performance Organic Single-Crystal Field-Effect Transistors of Indolo[3,2-b]carbazole and Their Potential Applications in Gas Controlled Organic Memory Devices (Adv. Mater. 43/2011) (page 5074)

      Hui Jiang, Huaping Zhao, Keke K. Zhang, Xiaodong Chen, Christian Kloc and Wenping Hu

      Article first published online: 14 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190171

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      The interaction between nitric oxide (NO) molecules and the organic crystal surface of indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ) can influence the charge carrier transport process of ICZ single crystal field-effect transistors. Random NO molecules come in contact with the crystal surface, initiate the reaction between NO and ICZ, and affect the threshold voltage of the device. As reported by Hui Jiang, Christian Kloc, Wenping Hu, and co-workers, this phenom-enon will uncover the potential applications of future gas-sensing and storage devices.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. High-Performance Organic Single-Crystal Field-Effect Transistors of Indolo[3,2-b]carbazole and Their Potential Applications in Gas Controlled Organic Memory Devices (pages 5075–5080)

      Hui Jiang, Huaping Zhao, Keke K. Zhang, Xiaodong Chen, Christian Kloc and Wenping Hu

      Article first published online: 28 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102975

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      Single crystals of linear fused rings with nitrogen heteroatom, indolo[3,2-b]carbazole (ICZ), have been synthesized. In addition, field-effect transistors (FETs) of planar ICZ single crystals have been fabricated. The hole mobility approaches values of up to 1.0 cm2 V−1 s−1 with an on/off ratio of ∼106. The transistors exhibit sensitivity to nitric oxide (NO). The gas-sensitive behavior indicates the great potential for future low-cost and high-density storage devices.

    2. Novel Solid-State Li/LiFePO4 Battery Configuration with a Ternary Nanocomposite Electrolyte for Practical Applications (pages 5081–5085)

      Feng Wu, Guoqiang Tan, Renjie Chen, Li Li, Jin Xiang and Yuelei Zheng

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103161

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      A novel ternary nanocomposite electrolyte based on an ionic liquid electrolyte immobilized in a mesoporous SiO2 matrix is demonstrated in a solid-state Li/TNCE/LiFePO4 battery configuration (see figure) to give solid-state lithium ion batteries viable for practical applications. This specific solid-state battery has the advantages of high energy/power density, good safety, low cost, flexible design, and environmental benignity.

    3. Sub-Micrometer Charge Modulation Microscopy of a High Mobility Polymeric n-Channel Field-Effect Transistor (pages 5086–5090)

      Calogero Sciascia, Nicola Martino, Torben Schuettfort, Benjamin Watts, Giulia Grancini, Maria Rosa Antognazza, Margherita Zavelani-Rossi, Christopher R. McNeill and Mario Caironi

      Article first published online: 12 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102410

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      Electro-optical mapping of the charge density with sub-micrometer resolution can be obtained in a high mobility, top-gate n-channel polymer field-effect transistor by charge modulation microscopy. Local features on the 1 μm scale are unveiled and, using scanning transmission X-ray microscopy measurements, are attributed to structural variations within the polymeric film.

    4. Ambipolar Multi-Stripe Organic Field-Effect Transistors (pages 5091–5097)

      Massimiliano Cavallini, Pasquale D'Angelo, Victoria Vendrell Criado, Denis Gentili, Arian Shehu, Francesca Leonardi, Silvia Milita, Fabiola Liscio and Fabio Biscarini

      Article first published online: 12 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103439

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      Organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on molecular multiwires are obtained by driving the self-organization of two types of molecular semiconductors inside an electronic device structure by means of a stamp-assisted deposition, followed by vacuum sublimation of a second OS, to yield an ambipolar OFET.

    5. Physically Associated Synthetic Hydrogels with Long-Term Covalent Stabilization for Cell Culture and Stem Cell Transplantation (pages 5098–5103)

      Jianjun Zhang, Talar Tokatlian, Jin Zhong, Quinn K. T. Ng, Michaela Patterson, William E. Lowry, S. Thomas Carmichael and Tatiana Segura

      Article first published online: 14 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103349

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      Poly(ethylene glycol)-poly(propylene sulfide) (PEG-PPS) hydrogels are injectable synthetic non-protease degradable hydrogels that allow cell spreading and proliferation in vitro and cellular infiltration in vivo. Further, this hydrogel promotes the survival of transplanted neural progenitor cells in the brain. PEG-PPS hydrogels form through a combination of hydrophobic interactions between the PPS domains and covalent bonds through disulfide exchange reactions of the polymer end groups.

    6. Carbon Nanotube Array/Polymer Core/Shell Structured Composites with High Dielectric Permittivity, Low Dielectric Loss, and Large Energy Density (pages 5104–5108)

      Haiyang Liu, Yang Shen, Yu Song, Ce-Wen Nan, Yuanhua Lin and Xiaoping Yang

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102079

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      A carbon nanotube (CNT)/polymer composite is prepared with a CNT array using an electrospinning method and hot-pressing technology. This composite exhibits a stable high dielectric permittivity and low dielectric loss over a wide frequency range, in addition to a large energy density.

    7. One-Dimensional Polyelectrolyte/Polymeric Semiconductor Core/Shell Structure: Sulfonated Poly(arylene ether ketone)/Polyaniline Nanofibers for Organic Field-Effect Transistors (pages 5109–5112)

      Wei Wang, Xiaofeng Lu, Zhenyu Li, Junyu Lei, Xincai Liu, Zhaojie Wang, Hongnan Zhang and Ce Wang

      Article first published online: 10 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102125

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      A polyelectrolyte/polymeric semiconductor core/shell structure is developed for organic field-effect transistors (OFETs) based on sulfonated poly(arylene ether ketone)/polyaniline core/shell nanofibers via electrospinning and solution-phase selective polymerization. The polyelectrolyte does not work as a gate dielectric, but can provide an internal modulation from the nanointerface of the 1D core/shell nanostructure. The transistor devices display very high mobilities.

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