Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 44

Special Issue: Special Issue: Materials Science in Madrid

November 23, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 44

Pages 5115–5326

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Materials Science in Madrid: (Adv. Mater. 44/2011) (page 5115)

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190175

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      This Special Issue is dedicated to current research activities on Materials Science in the community of Madrid (Spain) and introduces a collection of con-tributions from diverse research groups working in graphene, inorganic porous solids, hybrid and bio-hybrid materials, biomaterials, and electrochemical, magnetic and optical devices among other functional systems. Some selected images from these contri-butions are displayed, simulating the characteristic habit of the blocks constituting the sepiolite fibers, a very abundant silicate in the Madrid area, with the new skyscraper “Torre Espacio” (©PromoMadrid, author Alfredo Urdaci) as background image. Cover design by M. Darder, J.I. Reguera and E. Ruiz-Hitzky.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Strain-Balanced Epitaxial Stacks of Quantum Dots and Posts: Strain Balanced Epitaxial Stacks of Quantum Dots and Quantum Posts (Adv. Mater. 44/2011) (page 5116)

      Diego Alonso-Álvarez, Jose María Ripalda, Benito Alén, Jose María Llorens, Antonio Rivera and Fernando Briones

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190176

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      It is expected that optoelectronic devices embed-ding quantum nanostructures will more efficiently harvest sunlight and outperform current light-emit-ting devices and amplifiers. The advantages and difficulties of compensating the stress introduced by these nanostructures are only recently becoming clear. On page 5256, Diego Alonso-Álvarez, Jose María Ripalda, Benito Alén, and co-workers present how a proper combination of barrier materials and in situ monitoring allows for the engineering of the strain in quantum dot stacks and quantum posts, which will improve their future performance in different optoelectronic applications.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
  4. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. You have free access to this content
      Materials Science in Madrid (pages 5126–5129)

      Eduardo Ruiz-Hitzky

      Version of Record online: 18 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103715

  5. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Multiscale Modeling of Composite Materials: a Roadmap Towards Virtual Testing (pages 5130–5147)

      J. LLorca, C. González, J. M. Molina-Aldareguía, J. Segurado, R. Seltzer, F. Sket, M. Rodríguez, S. Sádaba, R. Muñoz and L. P. Canal

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101683

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      A bottom-up, multiscale modeling approach is presented to carry out high-fidelity virtual mechanical tests of composite materials and structures. The strategy begins with the in situ measurement of the matrix and interface mechanical properties from the nanometer to micrometer range to build up a “ladder” of the numerical simulations, which take into account the relevant deformation and failure mechanisms at different length scales relevant to individual plies, laminates, and components.

  6. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Molecular Self-Assembly at Solid Surfaces (pages 5148–5176)

      Roberto Otero, José María Gallego, Amadeo L. Vázquez de Parga, Nazario Martín and Rodolfo Miranda

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102022

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      The surface plays an active role on the self-assembly of organic molecules on solid surfaces, as revealed by a combination of surface sensitive techniques, most prominently scanning tunneling microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, on a wide variety of molecular adsorbates. For example for tetracyano-p-quinodimethane it is shown that bonding to the surface leads to structural rearrangements at both sides of the organic metal interface.

    2. Bioceramics: From Bone Regeneration to Cancer Nanomedicine (pages 5177–5218)

      María Vallet-Regí and Eduardo Ruiz-Hernández

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101586

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      Bone tissue engineering, drug delivery and applications in nanomedi cine are major research fields involving bioceramics. Advances in the manufacturing of bone-like scaffolds and the controlled release of bioactive agents are here reviewed. Further developments related to cancer nanomedicine are presented with special emphasis on porous carriers able to act as magnetic mediators for hyperthermia against tumors.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Light Emission from Nanocrystalline Si Inverse Opals and Controlled Passivation by Atomic Layer Deposited Al2O3 (pages 5219–5223)

      Francisco Gallego-Gómez, Marta Ibisate, Dolores Golmayo, F. Javier Palomares, Miriam Herrera, Jesús Hernández, Sergio I. Molina, Álvaro Blanco and Cefe López

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101797

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      3D-nanostructured ensembles of silicon nanocrystals forming inverse opals, directly prepared by magnesioreduction, exhibited intense photoluminescence in a broadband range (visible and NIR). Light emission, which strongly diminished under photoexcitation, was preserved by engineering the nanocrystals interface with atomic layer deposition of alumina. The high accessibility of the nanocrystals throughout the self-supported structure was a key factor for efficient photoluminescence stabilization.

    2. Multifunctional Porous Materials Through Ferrofluids (pages 5224–5228)

      Yorexis González-Alfaro, Pilar Aranda, Francisco M. Fernandes, Bernd Wicklein, Margarita Darder and Eduardo Ruiz-Hitzky

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101364

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      Multifunctional superparamagnetic materials based on porous solids have been prepared by an innovative, simple and easy procedure that implies their treatment with ferrofluids. Results support that this approach can be especially useful for technological, environmental and biomedical applications for replacing separation processes by conventional filtration or centrifugation. This methodology has been also applied for the preparation of hybrid buckypapers, showing that it can be also relevant for the development of other superparamagnetic multifunctional materials for diverse advanced applications.

  8. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Editorial
    6. Progress Report
    7. Reviews
    8. Communications
    9. Research News
    1. Recent Advances in Clay/Polymer Nanocomposites (pages 5229–5236)

      N. Bitinis, M. Hernandez, R. Verdejo, J. M. Kenny and M. A. Lopez-Manchado

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101948

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      The incorporation of organoclay into nanocomposites gives rise to a new relaxation mode ascribed to a restricted segmental mode. This new relaxation was attributed to segmental dynamics of the polymer chains partially immobilized as an interface layer around the clay particles, and so the interfacial effects dominate the bulk properties of the material.

    2. Tunable Ferrites as Environmentally Friendly Materials for Energy-Efficient Processes (pages 5237–5242)

      Inmaculada Álvarez-Serrano, Maria Angeles Arillo, Maria Luisa López, Maria Luisa Veiga and Carlos Pico

      Version of Record online: 8 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101727

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      Spinel ferrites can be tuned for specifically highlighting their potential applications in magnetocaloric-refrigeration or lithium- battery technologies. Both the cation distribution in the octahedral and tetrahedral sites and the grain size are crucial factors that determine the magnetic and electrical responses. New methods are successfully employed to synthesize these ceramics with improved properties for specific applications.

    3. The Iron Oxides Strike Back: From Biomedical Applications to Energy Storage Devices and Photoelectrochemical Water Splitting (pages 5243–5249)

      Pedro Tartaj, Maria P. Morales, Teresita Gonzalez-Carreño, Sabino Veintemillas-Verdaguer and Carlos J. Serna

      Version of Record online: 8 JUL 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101368

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      Abundance combined with facile synthesis, low biotoxicity. natural elimination and a broad variety of physical properties (optical, electronic and magnetic) make of iron oxide a material to be considered in energy solutions, healthcare applications and catalyst remediation and transformation

    4. Supported Graphene from Natural Resources: Easy Preparation and Applications (pages 5250–5255)

      Eduardo Ruiz-Hitzky, Margarita Darder, Francisco M. Fernandes, Ezzouhra Zatile, Francisco Javier Palomares and Pilar Aranda

      Version of Record online: 12 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101988

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      A new concept in the preparation of supported graphene and graphene-like materials based on table sugar and gelatin in the presence of porous silicates and silica is introduced. Recent results demonstrate the ability of sucrose (the sweet way) and gelatin (the jelly way) to form conducting graphenic layers assembled to silicates and silica under standard thermal treatment.

    5. Strain Balanced Epitaxial Stacks of Quantum Dots and Quantum Posts (pages 5256–5261)

      Diego Alonso-Álvarez, Jose María Ripalda, Benito Alén, Jose María Llorens, Antonio Rivera and Fernando Briones

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101639

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      The stacking of self-assembled epitaxial quantum dots with sub-nanometer spacer layers leads to the formation of quasi-1D nanostructures or quantum posts (QP). Using a matrix material with a small lattice parameter for strain compensation, the length of the QPs can be increased upwards of 100 nm. The resulting anisotropic strain field favors the luminescence emitted with dominant transverse magnetic component in the [1–10] direction.

    6. Progress in Bionanocomposite and Bioinspired Foams (pages 5262–5267)

      Margarita Darder, Pilar Aranda, M. Luisa Ferrer, María C. Gutiérrez, Francisco del Monte and Eduardo Ruiz-Hitzky

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101617

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      Recent progress in the development of advanced bionanocomposite and bioinspired foams with controlled porosity and low relative density is paving the way towards applications in a wide range of fields, from energy storage and insulating materials with reduced flammability for application in building and transport productivity sectors to novel scaffolds for tissue engineering and other biomedical purposes.

    7. Tailoring Interface Structure in Highly Strained YSZ/STO Heterostructures (pages 5268–5274)

      A. Rivera-Calzada, M. R. Diaz-Guillen, O. J. Dura, G. Sanchez-Santolino, T. J. Pennycook, R. Schmidt, F. Y. Bruno, J. Garcia-Barriocanal, Z. Sefrioui, N. M. Nemes, M. Garcia-Hernandez, M. Varela, C. Leon, S. T. Pantelides, S. J. Pennycook and J. Santamaria

      Version of Record online: 4 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102106

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      Heterostructures combining transition metal oxides are an interesting playground for the search of materials with enhanced ion diffusivities, of interest in devices for energy generation and storage. In particular, the control of the interface structure of highly strained YSZ/SrTiO3 superlattices allows changing ion conductivity in a wide range.

    8. Immobilized Biocatalysts: Novel Approaches and Tools for Binding Enzymes to Supports (pages 5275–5282)

      Pamela Torres-Salas, Alberto del Monte-Martinez, Bessy Cutiño-Avila, Barbara Rodriguez-Colinas, Miguel Alcalde, Antonio O. Ballesteros and Francisco J. Plou

      Version of Record online: 16 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101821

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      Novel trends for immobilization of enzymes in solid carriers are emerging to rationalize the classical “trial and error” methods. In silico analysis is useful to predict the orientation of covalently immobilized proteins or the enzyme regions involved in adsorption to the support. Tailor-made carriers, such as ordered mesoporous silica with specific physical and chemical properties, present new challenges for material scientists.

    9. Towards Inorganic Porous Materials by Design: Looking for New Architectures (pages 5283–5292)

      Manuela E. Medina, Ana E. Platero-Prats, Natalia Snejko, Alex Rojas, Angeles Monge, Felipe Gándara, Enrique Gutiérrez-Puebla and Miguel A. Camblor

      Version of Record online: 22 AUG 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101852

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      Crystalline porous materials, such as zeolites and metal-organic frameworks, present a very large interest for actual and/or potential technological uses. Their syntheses by design for targeted applications critically depend on the ability to shape their structures and functionalities. This requires a deep understanding of structure-direction issues, whose state of the art is briefly reviewed in this article.

    10. Operando Spectroscopy: the Knowledge Bridge to Assessing Structure–Performance Relationships in Catalyst Nanoparticles (pages 5293–5301)

      Miguel A. Bañares

      Version of Record online: 23 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101803

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      Progress in nanomaterials and catalysis is founded on the simultaneous implementation of three strategies: the synthesis of nanomaterials and hierarchically dispersed nanoparticles; the theoretical study of materials that enable experimental results to be understood; and advanced, in situ characterization during operation (operando methodology).

    11. Interphases in Graphene Polymer-based Nanocomposites: Achievements and Challenges (pages 5302–5310)

      Mauricio Terrones, Olga Martín, María González, Javier Pozuelo, Berna Serrano, Juan C. Cabanelas, Sofía M. Vega-Díaz and Juan Baselga

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102036

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      In this Research News we summarize the synthesis and properties of graphene and its derivatives, and provide an overview of the latest research on polymer composites for different applications. It is vital to understand the chemistry and physics of the interphases established between the polymer and the graphene surfaces. We believe that their control will result in robust graphene-based polymer composites.

    12. Coordination Polymers for Nanoelectronics (pages 5311–5317)

      Julio Gómez-Herrero and Félix Zamora

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101952

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      Recent progress in the potential useof coordination polymers as molecular wires for nanoelectronics is evaluated. To this end we review some basic aspects of these materials including synthesis and properties in the bulk scale. Next, the processability of such polymers with repsect to the formation of nanoscale structures on surfaces is discussed. Seminal works on electrical transport of coordination polymers show the viability of these materials as potential molecular wires. Finally, we summarize some of the perspectives in this field.

    13. Optical and Electro-optical Materials Prepared by the Sol-Gel Method (pages 5318–5323)

      Marcos Zayat, Rosario Pardo, Erick Castellón, Leonardo Torres, David Almendro, Pilar G. Parejo, Alberto Álvarez, Tomás Belenguer, Sara García-Revilla, Rolindes Balda, Joaquín Fernández and David Levy

      Version of Record online: 28 SEP 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201101927

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      The preparation and characterization of hybrid materials for optics and electro-optics via sol-gel methods is dicussed: hybrid coatings for smart-window applications, photoactive coatings, radiation-protection coatings, coatings for optical lenses and photochromic materials. The optical and electro-optical properties of the resulting materials are evaluated as potential components in photonic devices.

    14. Progress in Modeling Graphene: The Novel Features of this Material (pages 5324–5326)

      Francisco Guinea, María A. H. Vozmediano, María P. López-Sancho and José González

      Version of Record online: 31 OCT 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103354

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      Graphene is a unique material. It is a highly conductive flexible and transparent membrane, one atom thick. Here, we review modeling work on some of these aspects, such as “strain engineering”, the unusual effect of long range deformations on the electron structure, and defect induced magnetic moments.

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