Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 23 Issue 48

December 22, 2011

Volume 23, Issue 48

Pages 5703–5827

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Light-Emitting Diodes: Thermally Stable, Dye-Bridged Nanohybrid-Based White Light-Emitting Diodes (Adv. Mater. 48/2011) (page 5703)

      Seung-Yeon Kwak, SeungCheol Yang, Na Ree Kim, Jae Hong Kim and Byeong-Soo Bae

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190196

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Dye-bridged nanohybrids in which red and green luminescent dyes are covalently bridged to oligosi-loxane for white light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are reported on page 5767 by Byeong-Soo Bae and co-workers. The nanohybrid-based white LEDs have a high color rendering index and high thermal resistance due to the siloxane network and the chemically bridged hybrid structure. This organic luminescent material is a potential alternative to inorganic phosphors for high-performance white LEDs.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Chiral Materials: Chiral Self-Assembled Solid Microspheres: A Novel Multifunctional Microphotonic Device (Adv. Mater. 48/2011) (page 5704)

      Gabriella Cipparrone, Alfredo Mazzulla, Alfredo Pane, Raul Josue Hernandez and Roberto Bartolino

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190197

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The photopolymerization of cholesteric liquid crystal droplets leads to the generation of solid chiral microspheres. The methodological approach of Cipparrone et al. reported on page 5773 enables control of the internal helical geometry of solid particles using dopant species in the precursor liquid crystal emulsion. The solid particles exhibit fascinating optical properties appropriate for applications in lab-on-a-chip technologies and colloidal science. Their unique capabilities are demonstrated by optical manipulation and lasing experiments.

  3. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 48/2011) (pages 5705–5710)

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190194

  4. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Practical Roadmap and Limits to Nanostructured Photovoltaics (pages 5712–5727)

      Richard R. Lunt, Timothy P. Osedach, Patrick R. Brown, Jill A. Rowehl and Vladimir Bulović

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103404

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The practical efficiency limits for nanostructured photovoltaics including organic small molecule, dye-sensitized, polymer, and colloidal-quantum-dot architectures estimated a posteriori are assessed. The specific challenges associated with improving the electrical power conversion efficiency of various nanostructured photovoltaic (nano-PV) technologies are discussed and several approaches to reduce their thermal losses beyond the single bandgap limit are reviewed. Critical considerations related to the module lifetime and cost that are unique to nano-PV architectures are also discussed.

  5. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. The Marriage of Terpyridines and Inorganic Nanoparticles: Synthetic Aspects, Characterization Techniques, and Potential Applications (pages 5728–5748)

      Andreas Winter, Martin D. Hager, George R. Newkome and Ulrich S. Schubert

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103612

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Metal-to-ligand coordination is utilized in nanotechnology for the stabilization and directed self-assembly of nanometer-sized inorganic materials into highly ordered arrays. Moreover, hybrid materials for applications in nanoelectronics or catalysis are obtained when redox-active complexes are bound to (semi)conducting species (e.g., fullerenes, polyoxometalates). Among others, 2,2′:6′,2″-terpyridines, as chelating ligands, are widely applied for these purposes.

  6. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Supramolecular Materials: Photosensitized Hydrogen Evolution from Water Using a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Fullerodendron/SiO2 Coaxial Nanohybrid (Adv. Mater. 48/2011) (page 5749)

      Tomoyuki Tajima, Wakako Sakata, Takaaki Wada, Akira Tsutsui, Shunsuke Nishimoto, Michihiro Miyake and Yutaka Takaguchi

      Article first published online: 15 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201190195

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A coaxial nanohybrid consisting of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), fullerodendron, and SiO2 is created from a bottom-up approach by Yutaka Takaguchi and co-workers and shown to act as a photocatalyst, as reported on page 5750. The SWCNT/fullerodendron/SiO2 coaxial nanohybrid demonstrates highly efficient hydrogen evolution from water upon visible-light irradiation in the presence of methyl viologen, benzyldihydroni-cotinamide, and a colloidal polyvinyl alcohol–Pt.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Contents
    5. Progress Report
    6. Review
    7. Frontispiece
    8. Communications
    1. Photosensitized Hydrogen Evolution from Water Using a Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube/Fullerodendron/SiO2 Coaxial Nanohybrid (pages 5750–5754)

      Tomoyuki Tajima, Wakako Sakata, Takaaki Wada, Akira Tsutsui, Shunsuke Nishimoto, Michihiro Miyake and Yutaka Takaguchi

      Article first published online: 9 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103472

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A coaxial nanohybrid consisting of a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), fullerodendron, and SiO2 shows high-efficiency light-driven hydrogen evolution from water. Upon visible light irradiation, SWCNT/fullerodendron/SiO2 coaxial nanohybrid shows hydrogen evolution activity in the presence of methyl viologen (MV2+), benzyldihydronicotinamide (BNAH), and a colloidal polyvinyl alcohol(PVA)-Pt.

    2. Fabrication of Silicon Oxide Nanodots with an Areal Density Beyond 1 Teradots Inch−2 (pages 5755–5761)

      Ji Xu, Sung Woo Hong, Weiyin Gu, Kim Y. Lee, David S. Kuo, Shuaigang Xiao and Thomas P. Russell

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102964

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The combination of solvent annealing, surface reconstruction, and a tone-reversal etching procedure provides an attractive approach to utilize block copolymer (BCP) lithography to fabricate highly ordered and densely packed silicon oxide nano-dots on a surface. The obtained silicon oxide nano-dots feature an areal density of 1.3 teradots inch−2.

    3. Role of Majority and Minority Carrier Barriers Silicon/Organic Hybrid Heterojunction Solar Cells (pages 5762–5766)

      Sushobhan Avasthi, Stephanie Lee, Yueh-Lin Loo and James C. Sturm

      Article first published online: 23 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102712

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A hybrid approach to solar cells is demonstrated in which a silicon p–n junction, used in conventional silicon-based photovoltaics, is replaced by a room-temperature fabricated silicon/organic heterojunction. The unique advantage of silicon/organic heterojunction is that it exploits the cost advantage of organic semiconductors and the performance advantages of silicon to enable potentially low-cost, efficient solar cells.

    4. Thermally Stable, Dye-Bridged Nanohybrid-Based White Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 5767–5772)

      Seung-Yeon Kwak, SeungCheol Yang, Na Ree Kim, Jae Hong Kim and Byeong-Soo Bae

      Article first published online: 7 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103077

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thermally stable red and green light-emitting nanohybrids are introduced as an organic luminescent converter with broad color tunability and a high color rendering index for white light-emitting diodes (LEDs). Nanohybrid-based white LEDs are thermally stable and the color coordination is not changed by heat exposure.

    5. Chiral Self-Assembled Solid Microspheres: A Novel Multifunctional Microphotonic Device (pages 5773–5778)

      Gabriella Cipparrone, Alfredo Mazzulla, Alfredo Pane, Raul Josue Hernandez and Roberto Bartolino

      Article first published online: 15 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102828

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Solid chiral microspheres with unique and multifunctional optical properties are produced from cholesteric liquid crystal-water emulsions using photopolymerization processes. These self-organizing microspheres exhibit different internal configurations of helicoidal structures with radial, conical or cylindrical geometries, depending on the physicochemical characteristics of the precursor liquid crystal emulsion.

    6. Alignment of Liquid Crystals Doped with Nickel Nanoparticles Containing Different Morphologies (pages 5779–5784)

      Dongyu Zhao, Wei Zhou, Xiaopeng Cui, Yu Tian, Lin Guo and Huai Yang

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102611

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Uniform homeotropic and homogeneous alignment of liquid crystals (LCs) is facilely achieved by dispersing Ni nanoparticles (Ni NPs) into the LCs. The alignment mode depends on the morphology of the Ni NPs. The mechanism of NP-induced LC alignment is elucidated clearly, indicating that the perfect orientation arises from the adsorption of Ni NPs on the substrate.

    7. Shrink-Film Configurable Multiscale Wrinkles for Functional Alignment of Human Embryonic Stem Cells and their Cardiac Derivatives (pages 5785–5791)

      Aaron Chen, Deborah K. Lieu, Lauren Freschauf, Valerie Lew, Himanshu Sharma, Jiaxian Wang, Diep Nguyen, Ioannis Karakikes, Roger J. Hajjar, Ajay Gopinathan, Elliot Botvinick, Charless C. Fowlkes, Ronald A. Li and Michelle Khine

      Article first published online: 8 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103463

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A biomimetic substrate for cell-culture is fabricated by plasma treatment of a prestressed thermoplastic shrink film to create tunable multiscaled alignment “wrinkles”. Using this substrate, the functional alignment of human embryonic stem cell derived cardiomyocytes is demonstrated.

    8. Polypyrrole Nanoparticles: A Potential Optical Coherence Tomography Contrast Agent for Cancer Imaging (pages 5792–5795)

      Kin Man Au, Zenghai Lu, Stephen J. Matcher and Steven P. Armes

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103190

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A near-infrared (NIR) absorbing contrast agent based on polypyrrole nanoparticles is described. Quantitative optical coherence tomography studies on tissue phantoms and Mie scattering calculations indicate their potential application for early-stage cancer diagnosis.

    9. Broadband Optical Antireflection Enhancement by Integrating Antireflective Nanoislands with Silicon Nanoconical-Frustum Arrays (pages 5796–5800)

      Haesung Park, Dongheok Shin, Gumin Kang, Seunghwa Baek, Kyoungsik Kim and Willie J. Padilla

      Article first published online: 24 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103399

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Based on conventional colloidal nanosphere lithography, we experimentally demonstrate novel graded-index nanostructures for broadband optical antireflection enhancement including the near-ultraviolet (NUV) region by integrating residual polystyrene antireflective (AR) nanoislands coating arrays with silicon nano-conical-frustum arrays. This is a feasible optimized integration method of two major approaches for antireflective surfaces: quarter-wavelength AR coating and biomimetic moth's eye structure.

    10. Electrochemical Tuning of Luminescent Carbon Nanodots: From Preparation to Luminescence Mechanism (pages 5801–5806)

      Lei Bao, Zhi-Ling Zhang, Zhi-Quan Tian, Li Zhang, Cui Liu, Yi Lin, Baoping Qi and Dai-Wen Pang

      Article first published online: 6 DEC 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102866

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The size of C-nanodots can be electrochemically tuned by changing the applied potential during their preparation. The higher the applied potential, the smaller the resulting C-nanodots. Moreover, the surface oxidation degree of the C-nanodots can also be electrochemically tuned. The red-shift of emission independent of the size provides an insight into the luminescence mechanism of C-nanodots.

    11. Vacuum Lamination Approach to Fabrication of High-Performance Single-Crystal Organic Field-Effect Transistors (pages 5807–5811)

      H. T. Yi, Y. Chen, K. Czelen and V. Podzorov

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103305

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel vacuum lamination approach to fabrication of high-performance single-crystal organic field-effect transistors has been developed. The non-destructive nature of this method allows a direct comparison of field-effect mobilities achieved with various gate dielectrics using the same single-crystal sample. The method also allows gating delicate systems, such as n -type crystals and SAM-coated surfaces, without perturbation.

    12. Benign Joining of Ultrafine Grained Aerospace Aluminum Alloys Using Nanotechnology (pages 5812–5816)

      Rémi Longtin, Erwin Hack, Jürg Neuenschwander and Jolanta Janczak-Rusch

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103275

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ultrafine grained aluminum alloys have restricted applicability due to their limited thermal stability. Metalized 7475 alloys can be soldered and brazed at room temperature using nanotechnology. Reactive foils are used to release heat for milliseconds directly at the interface between two components leading to a metallurgical joint without significantly heating the bulk alloy, thus preserving its mechanical properties.

    13. Coupling Electrodeposition with Layer-by-Layer Assembly to Address Proteins within Microfluidic Channels (pages 5817–5821)

      Yifeng Wang, Yi Liu, Yi Cheng, Eunkyoung Kim, Gary W. Rubloff, William E. Bentley and Gregory F. Payne

      Article first published online: 21 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103726

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Two thin-film assembly methods are coupled to address proteins. Electrodeposition confers programmability and generates a template for layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly. LbL enables precise control of film thickness and the incorporation of labile biological components. The capabilities are demonstrated using glucose oxidase (GOx) based electrochemical biosensing within a microfabricated fluidic device.

    14. Strain-Mediated Phase Control and Electrolyte-Gating of Electron-Doped Manganites (pages 5822–5827)

      Ping-Hua Xiang, Shutaro Asanuma, Hiroyuki Yamada, Isao H. Inoue, Hiroshi Sato, Hiroshi Akoh, Akihito Sawa, Kazunori Ueno, Hongtao Yuan, Hidekazu Shimotani, Masashi Kawasaki and Yoshihiro Iwasa

      Article first published online: 22 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201102968

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A prototype Mott transistor, the electric double layer transistor with a strained CaMnO3 thin film, is fabricated. As predicted by the strain phase diagram of electron-doped manganite films, the device with the compressively strained CaMnO3 exhibits an immense conductivity modulation upon applying a tiny gate voltage of 2 V.

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