Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 14

April 10, 2012

Volume 24, Issue 14

Pages 1773–1911

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrections
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Research News
    1. Layered Composites: Bioinspired Layered Composites Based on Flattened Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (Adv. Mater. 14/2012) (page 1773)

      Qunfeng Cheng, Mingzhu Li, Lei Jiang and Zhiyong Tang

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290078

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      The cover illustrates a bioinspired strategy for fabricating layered composites based on flattened double-walled carbon nanotubes (FDWCNTs), as described by Q. F. Cheng, Z. Y. Tang, and co-workers on page 1838. The 2D feature of FDWCNTs facilitates formation of composites with a layered hierarchical micro-/nanostructure, which dramatically improves FDWCNT loading and results in good mechanical properties. This novel route is an important improvement towards achieving high-perform-ance CNT-reinforced polymer composites.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrections
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Research News
    1. Resistive Switching: Real-Time Observation on Dynamic Growth/Dissolution of Conductive Filaments in Oxide-Electrolyte-Based ReRAM (Adv. Mater. 14/2012) (page 1774)

      Qi Liu, Jun Sun, Hangbing Lv, Shibing Long, Kuibo Yin, Neng Wan, Yingtao Li, Litao Sun and Ming Liu

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290080

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      M. Liu and co-workers present an effective methodology on page 1844 to investigate in real-time the evolution of growth/dissolution of conductive filaments (CFs) in oxide-electrolyte resistance random access memory (RRAM). Contrary to common belief, it is found that CF growth begins at the anode (Ag or Cu), rather than having to reach the cathode (Pt) and grow backwards. A modified microscopic mechanism is also determined for the switching behavior of oxide-electrolyte RRAM.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrections
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Research News
    1. Nanocomposites: Controlling Reversible Dielectric Breakdown in Metal/Polymer Nanocomposites (Adv. Mater. 14/2012) (page 1912)

      Jiwon Kim and Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290081

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      Controlling reversible dielectric breakdown in metal/poly mer nanocomposites is reported on page 1850 by J. Kim and B. A. Grzybowski. The image illustrates reversible dielectric breakdown of an array of metal nanorods embedded in a polymer matrix and subject to an electric bias. The breakdown occurs in a threshold-like fashion such that the nanocomposite material can be repeatedly “cycled” between low- and high-conductance states. The breakdown voltage can be adjusted by engineering the properties of the polymer matrix.

  4. Masthead

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    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrections
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Research News
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 14/2012)

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290082

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrections
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Research News
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 14/2012) (pages 1775–1780)

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290075

  6. Corrections

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrections
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Research News
    1. You have free access to this content
      Correction: Microstructures of GaN Thin Films Grown on Graphene Layers (page 1780)

      Hyobin Yoo, Kunook Chung, Yong Seok Choi, Chan Soon Kang, Kyu Hwan Oh, Miyoung Kim* and Gyu-Chul Yi*

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290079

      This article corrects:

      Microstructures of GaN Thin Films Grown on Graphene Layers

      Vol. 24, Issue 4, 515–518, Article first published online: 27 DEC 2011

    2. You have free access to this content
      Correction: Organic thermoelectric materials and devices based on p- and n-type Poly(metal 1,1,2,2-ethenetetrathiolate)s (page 1781)

      Yimeng Sun, Peng Sheng, Chongan Di*, Fei Jiao, Wei Xu*, Dong Qiu and Daoben Zhu*

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290076

      This article corrects:

      Organic Thermoelectric Materials and Devices Based on p- and n-Type Poly(metal 1,1,2,2-ethenetetrathiolate)s

      Vol. 24, Issue 7, 932–937, Article first published online: 17 JAN 2012

  7. Reviews

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrections
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Research News
    1. Microfabricated Biomaterials for Engineering 3D Tissues (pages 1782–1804)

      Pinar Zorlutuna, Nasim Annabi, Gulden Camci-Unal, Mehdi Nikkhah, Jae Min Cha, Jason W. Nichol, Amir Manbachi, Hojae Bae, Shaochen Chen and Ali Khademhosseini

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104631

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      Microfabrication approaches for engineering three-dimensional biomimetic tissues are reviewed. Initially fabrication methods for generating structures that are capable of directing cell function are discussed. Subsequently, the applications of these methods in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine towards creating vasculature, directing stem cell differentiation and regulating cellular interactions are highlighted.

    2. State of the Art of Carbon Nanotube Fibers: Opportunities and Challenges (pages 1805–1833)

      Weibang Lu, Mei Zu, Joon-Hyung Byun, Byung-Sun Kim and Tsu-Wei Chou

      Article first published online: 21 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104672

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      Carbon nanotube (CNT) fibers have been developed in recent years as promising materials for various applications, such as tethers of space elevators, high-performance composites and electrochemical devices. In this review paper, we assess the recent advances in CNT fibers in terms of their fabrication methods, characterization and modeling of mechanical and physical properties, and applications. The opportunities and challenges in CNT fiber research are also discussed.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrections
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Research News
    1. Controlled Hierarchical Architecture in Surface-initiated Zwitterionic Polymer Brushes with Structurally Regulated Functionalities (pages 1834–1837)

      Chun-Jen Huang, Norman D. Brault, Yuting Li, Qiuming Yu and Shaoyi Jiang

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104849

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      Hierarchical polymer films with structurally regulated functionalities are achieved by integrating 2D and 3D structures to enable ultralow nonspecific protein binding and high loading of molecular recognition elements, such as antibodies.

    2. Bioinspired Layered Composites Based on Flattened Double-Walled Carbon Nanotubes (pages 1838–1843)

      Qunfeng Cheng, Mingzhu Li, Lei Jiang and Zhiyong Tang

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200179

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      Inspired by the layered hierarchical nano- and microstructures of natural nacre, flattened double-walled carbon nanotube (FDWCNT) reinforced epoxy composites are fabricated. Impressively, the prepared composites exhibit layered structures analogous to nacre, and the FDWCNT loading can reach 70 wt%, which results in superior mechanical properties that evidently outperform other existing materials.

    3. Real-Time Observation on Dynamic Growth/Dissolution of Conductive Filaments in Oxide-Electrolyte-Based ReRAM (pages 1844–1849)

      Qi Liu, Jun Sun, Hangbing Lv, Shibing Long, Kuibo Yin, Neng Wan, Yingtao Li, Litao Sun and Ming Liu

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104104

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      Evolution of growth/dissolution conductive filaments (CFs) in oxide-electrolyte-based resistive switching memories are studied by in situ transmission electron microscopy. Contrary to what is commonly believed, CFs are found to start growing from the anode (Ag or Cu) rather than having to reach the cathode (Pt) and grow backwards. A new mechanism based on local redox reactions inside the oxide-electrolyte is proposed.

    4. Controlling Reversible Dielectric Breakdown in Metal/Polymer Nanocomposites (pages 1850–1855)

      Jiwon Kim and Bartosz A. Grzybowski

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104334

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      Composites comprising metal nanorods encased in a polymer matrix exhibit reversible electric breakdown and can be cycled between low- and high-conductance states multiple times without permanent damage to the material. The voltage at which the breakdown occurs can be adjusted by engineering the properties of the polymeric matrix, in particular by doping the polymer with dipole-possessing additives whose role is to screen the applied electric fields.

    5. Facile Fabrication of Light, Flexible and Multifunctional Graphene Fibers (pages 1856–1861)

      Zelin Dong, Changcheng Jiang, Huhu Cheng, Yang Zhao, Gaoquan Shi, Lan Jiang and Liangti Qu

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200170

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      Macroscopic graphene fibers with strength comparable to carbon nanotube yarns have been fabricated with a facile dimensionally-confined hydrothermal strategy from low-cost, aqueous graphite oxide suspensions, which is shapable, weavable, and has a density of less than 1/7 conventional carbon fibers. In combination with the easy in situ and post-synthesis functionalization, the highly flexible graphene fibers can be woven into smart textiles.

    6. Large Magnetoresistance in Few Layer Graphene Stacks with Current Perpendicular to Plane Geometry (pages 1862–1866)

      Zhi-Min Liao, Han-Chun Wu, Shishir Kumar, Georg S. Duesberg, Yang-Bo Zhou, Graham L. W. Cross, Igor V. Shvets and Da-Peng Yu

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104796

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      A large magnetoresistance (MR) effect of few-layers graphene between two non-magnetic metal electrodes with current perpendicular to graphene plane is studied. A non-saturation and anisotropic MR with the value over 60% at 14 T is observed in a two-layer graphene stack at room temperature. The resistance of the device is only tens of ohms, having the advantage of low power consumption for magnetic device applications.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrections
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Research News
    1. Multimodal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy using Functionalized Graphene Nanosheets Anchored with Magnetic Nanoparticles (Adv. Mater. 14/2012) (page 1867)

      Kai Yang, Lilei Hu, Xingxing Ma, Shuoqi Ye, Liang Cheng, Xiaoze Shi, Changhui Li, Yonggang Li and Zhuang Liu

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290077

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      A nanoscale reduced graphene oxide–iron oxide nanoparticle (RGO–IONP) complex is nonco-valently functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG) by Z. Liu and co-workers on page 1868, obtaining a RGO–IONP–PEG nanocomposite which displays excellent physiological stability, strong NIR optical absorbance, and superpara-magnetic properties. This theranostic nanoprobe allows multimodal tumor imaging - in vivo triple modal fluorescence, photoacoustic, and magnetic resonance imaging are carried out, uncovering high passive tumor targeting, which is further used for the effective photothermal ablation of tumors in mice.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrections
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Research News
    1. Multimodal Imaging Guided Photothermal Therapy using Functionalized Graphene Nanosheets Anchored with Magnetic Nanoparticles (pages 1868–1872)

      Kai Yang, Lilei Hu, Xingxing Ma, Shuoqi Ye, Liang Cheng, Xiaoze Shi, Changhui Li, Yonggang Li and Zhuang Liu

      Article first published online: 29 FEB 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104964

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      In this work, a nanoscale reduced graphene oxide–iron oxide nanoparticle (RGO–IONP) complex is noncovalently functionalized with polyethylene glycol (PEG), obtaining a RGO–IONP–PEG nanocomposite with excellent physiological stability, strong NIR optical absorbance, and superparamagnetic properties. Using this theranostic nanoprobe, in-vivo triple modal fluorescence, photoacoustic, and magnetic resonance imaging are carried out, uncovering high passive tumor targeting, which is further used for effective photothermal ablation of tumors in mice.

    2. High-Efficiency Single Emissive Layer White Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Based on Solution-Processed Dendritic Host and New Orange-Emitting Iridium Complex (pages 1873–1877)

      Baohua Zhang, Guiping Tan, Ching-Shan Lam, Bing Yao, Cheuk-Lam Ho, Lihui Liu, Zhiyuan Xie, Wai-Yeung Wong, Junqiao Ding and Lixiang Wang

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104758

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      An extremely high-efficiency solution-processed white organic light-emitting diode (WOLED) is successfully developed by simultaneously using an ideal dendritic host material and a novel efficient orange phosphorescent iridium complex. The optimized device exhibits forward-viewing efficiencies of 70.6 cd A−1, 26.0%, and 47.6 lm W−1 at a luminance of 100 cd m−2, respectively, promising the low-cost solution-processed WOLEDs a bright future as the next generation of illumination sources.

    3. Noble Metal-Free Oxidative Electrocatalysts: Polyaniline and Co(II)-Polyaniline Nanostructures Hosted in Nanoporous Silica (pages 1878–1883)

      Rafael Silva and Tewodros Asefa

      Article first published online: 13 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104126

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      An efficient nanocomposite electrocatalyst composed of mesoporous silica (SBA-15) with polyaniline (PANI) nanostructures within its channel pores (PANI/SBA-15) is synthesized and characterized. The resulting PANI/SBA-15 is capable of chelating Co(II) ions, presumably via its nitrogen atoms on PANI/diamine groups. Both the metal-free (SBA-15/PANI) and the Co(II)-doped SBA-15/PANI nanocomposite materials showed high electrocatalytic activity for oxidation of L-ascorbic acid, with very low overpotential and high current density. The activity of PANI/SBA-15 toward oxidation of L-ascorbic acid is comparable to that obtained from a conventional Pt/C electrocatalyst.

    4. A Large-Area Light-Weight Dye-Sensitized Solar Cell based on All Titanium Substrates with an Efficiency of 6.69% Outdoors (pages 1884–1888)

      Jihuai Wu, Yaoming Xiao, Qunwei Tang, Gentian Yue, Jianming Lin, Miaoliang Huang, Yunfang Huang, Leqing Fan, Zhang Lan, Shu Yin and Tsugio Sato

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200003

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      Light-weight PEDOT–Pt/Ti mesh and Ti/TiO2 foil electrodes are prepared. Owing to the PEDOT–Pt/Ti photocathode's high transparency, good electrocatalytic activity, and low resistance; the Ti/TiO2 anode's large specific area and high conductivity, a light-weight backside illuminated large-area (100 cm2) dye-sensitized solar cell achieves an energy conversion efficiency of 6.69% under an outdoors sunlight irradiation of 55 mW cm−2.

    5. Mesoporous Block Copolymer Nanoparticles with Tailored Structures by Hydrogen-Bonding-Assisted Self-Assembly (pages 1889–1893)

      Renhua Deng, Shanqin Liu, Jingyi Li, Yonggui Liao, Juan Tao and Jintao Zhu

      Article first published online: 7 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200102

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      A simple, yet robust route to prepare polymer nanoparticles with tunable internal structures through supramolecular assembly within emulsion droplets is presented. Nanoparticles with various internal morphologies, including dispersed spheres, dispersed spirals, stacked toroids, and concentric lamellae, are obtained due to the 3D confinement and variation of hydrogen-bonding agent. This method also allows us to form mesoporous particles through further disassembly of the supramoleclar assemblies by rupturing the hydrogen bonding.

    6. A New Supramolecular Hole Injection/Transport Material on Conducting Polymer for Application in Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 1894–1898)

      Yu-Lin Chu, Chih-Chia Cheng, Ying-Chieh Yen and Feng-Chih Chang

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103866

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      A new DNA-mimetic π-conjugated polymer poly(triphenylamine-carbazole) (PTC-U) has been prepared which exhibits high thermal stability, non-corrosion, excellent hole injection and electron-blocking abilities in the solid state owing to the uracil induced physical cross-linking. In addition, a trilayer device with PTC-U as a hole injection/transport layer is approximately 1.6 times higher than that of the commercial product PEDOT:PSS-based devices.

    7. Engineering of Contact Resistance between Transparent Single-Walled Carbon Nanotube Films and a-Si:H Single Junction Solar Cells by Gold Nanodots (pages 1899–1902)

      Jeehwan Kim, Augustin J. Hong, Bhupesh Chandra, George S. Tulevski and Devendra K. Sadana

      Article first published online: 5 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104677

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      The viability of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) as a transparent conducting electrode on a-Si:H based single junction solar cells was explored. A Schottky barrier formed at a SWCNT/a-Si:H interface was removed by introducing high work function gold nanodots at the SWCNT/a-Si:H interface. This allows comparable device performance from SWCNT-electrode-based a-Si:H solar cells to that obtained by using conventional transparent conducting oxides.

  11. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Corrections
    8. Reviews
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Research News
    1. Metal Oxide Hollow Nanostructures for Lithium-ion Batteries (pages 1903–1911)

      Zhiyu Wang, Liang Zhou and Xiong Wen (David) Lou

      Article first published online: 14 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200469

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      Metal oxide hollow structures are promising electrode materials for use in lithium-ion batteries. This article highlights the recent advances in synthesis of high-quality hollow structures of metal oxides. The enhanced lithium storage capability of these functional materials is discussed on the basis of their unique structural features.

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