Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 27

July 17, 2012

Volume 24, Issue 27

Pages 3581–3704

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Functional Nanovehicles: Molecular Engineered Super-Nanodevices: Smart and Safe Delivery of Potent Drugs into Tumors (Adv. Mater. 27/2012) (page 3581)

      Mingming Ding, Jiehua Li, Xueling He, Nijia Song, Hong Tan, Yi Zhang, Lijuan Zhou, Qun Gu, Hua Deng and Qiang Fu

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290165

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A molecularly engineered super-nanodevice integrates various desired properties in a smart and co-ordinated way, allowing certain functionalities to be switched on or off as required. As shown on page 3639 by H. Tan, Q. Fu, and co-workers, this nanovehicle could break through complex physiological barriers, and then precisely ferry potent toxic drugs into tumor cells in vivo, thus significantly maximizing the therapeutic efficacy and reducing drug toxicity.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Hydrogels: Mosaic Hydrogels: One-Step Formation of Multiscale Soft Materials (Adv. Mater. 27/2012) (page 3582)

      Lian Leng, Arianna McAllister, Boyang Zhang, Milica Radisic and Axel Günther

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290166

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      A one-step, continuous formation of mosaic hydrogels is described by A. Günther and coworkers on page 3650. A multilayer microfluidic platform enables a secondary biopolymer to be dynamically incorporated within a flowing biopolymer sheet prior to cross-linking. Stacked or tubular mosaic hydrogel assemblies with millimeter to centimeter length scales are created, as well as tesselations with locally varying composition, and primary cells could be incorporated. In addition, information may be stored and recorded.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Drug Delivery: Multistage pH-Responsive Liposomes for Mitochondrial-Targeted Anticancer Drug Delivery (Adv. Mater. 27/2012) (page 3705)

      Ran Mo, Qiong Sun, Jingwei Xue, Nan Li, Wenyuan Li, Can Zhang and Qineng Ping

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290167

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Liposomes with multistage pH-response to a mildly acidic tumor extracellular matrix and acidic intracellular compartments are like rockets for transporting anticancer drugs to mitochondria, as reported by C. Zhang and co-workers. On page 3659, liposomes reverse the charge of the tumor microenvironment, enhancing cellular uptake (white flying rocket), escape from endolysosomes (blue sphere), and delivery to mitochondria in tumor cells (black flying rocket), providing a safe, efficient carrier platform for cascade drug delivery on the basis of a kinetic process.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 27/2012)

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290168

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 27/2012) (pages 3583–3588)

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290162

  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Emerging Applications of Atomic Layer Deposition for Lithium-Ion Battery Studies (pages 3589–3615)

      Xiangbo Meng, Xiao-Qing Yang and Xueliang Sun

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200397

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      Atomic layer deposition (ALD) is a highly tunable technique for fabricating various nanostructured materials that can potentially be used in lithium-ion batteries (LIBs) as anodes, cathodes, or inorganic solid electrolytes. It is also a viable approach to coat electrode materials of LIBs for improved performance.

  7. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. High-Contrast Photopatterning of Photoluminescence within Quantum Dot Films through Degradation of a Charge-Transfer Quencher (Adv. Mater. 27/2012) (page 3616)

      Mario Tagliazucchi, Victor A. Amin, Severin T. Schneebeli, J. Fraser Stoddart and Emily A. Weiss

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290163

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      Poly(viologen) quenches the photoluminescence of CdSe quantum dots via a charge transfer as shown by E. A. Weiss and co-workers on page 3617. Continuous illumination of a composite film of quantum dots and poly(viologen) through a mask, or by a scanning laser beam, reveals diffractionlimited patterns of photoluminescence in the film by degrading the quenching viologen in its cation radical form.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. High-Contrast Photopatterning of Photoluminescence within Quantum Dot Films through Degradation of a Charge-Transfer Quencher (pages 3617–3621)

      Mario Tagliazucchi, Victor A. Amin, Severin T. Schneebeli, J. Fraser Stoddart and Emily A. Weiss

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201356

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Diffraction-limited, high-contrast photopatterning of the photoluminescence of layer-by-layer films comprising CdSe@CdS@ZnS quantum dots and polyviologen is reported. The photoluminescence of the quantum dots is initially quantitatively quenched due to ultrafast photoinduced electron transfer to polyviologen. Photopatterning is achieved by high-power or prolonged illumination in air, which photochemically degrades the polyviologen and thereby restores the photoluminescence of the quantum dots.

    2. Chalcopyrite CuGaTe2: A High-Efficiency Bulk Thermoelectric Material (pages 3622–3626)

      Theerayuth Plirdpring, Ken Kurosaki, Atsuko Kosuga, Tristan Day, Samad Firdosy, Vilupanur Ravi, G. Jeffrey Snyder, Adul Harnwunggmoung, Tohru Sugahara, Yuji Ohishi, Hiroaki Muta and Shinsuke Yamanaka

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200732

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      CuGaTe2 with a chalcopyrite structure demonstrates promising thermoelectric properties. The maximum figure of merit ZT is 1.4 at 950 K. CuGaTe2 and related chalcopyrites are a new class of high-efficiency bulk thermoelectric material for high-temperature applications.

    3. Core-Shell Nanocapsules Stabilized by Single-Component Polymer and Nanoparticles for Magneto-Chemotherapy/Hyperthermia with Multiple Drugs (pages 3627–3632)

      Shang-Hsiu Hu, Bang-Jie Liao, Chin-Sheng Chiang, Po-Jung Chen, I-Wei Chen and San-Yuan Chen

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201251

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      Iron-oxide-containing double emulsion capsules carrying both hydrophilic and hydrophobic therapeutic molecules can deliver drugs and energy on demand in vivo. Magneto-chemotherapy/hyperthermia involves a burst-like release of hydrophilic doxorubicin and hydrophobic paclitaxel, remotely triggered by a high frequency magnetic field, which also releases energy via internalized iron oxide nanoparticles, all contributing to cell kill.

    4. SMALL-Hysteresis Thin-Film Transistors Achieved by Facile Dip-Coating of Nanotube/Polymer Composite (pages 3633–3638)

      Zhiying Liu, Hui Li, Zhijun Qiu, Shi-Li Zhang and Zhi-Bin Zhang

      Article first published online: 15 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200906

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Small-hysteresis, high-performance thin-film transistors (TFTs) are readily realized simply by dip-coating of a solution-processable composite. The composite consists of single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) embedded in semiconducting polymer used as the channel material. The resultant TFTs simultaneously exhibit large on/off current ratio, high on-current level, high mobility in the range 10−20 cm2V−1s−1, and good uniformity and scalability.

    5. Molecular Engineered Super-Nanodevices: Smart and Safe Delivery of Potent Drugs into Tumors (pages 3639–3645)

      Mingming Ding, Jiehua Li, Xueling He, Nijia Song, Hong Tan, Yi Zhang, Lijuan Zhou, Qun Gu, Hua Deng and Qiang Fu

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200954

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A super-nanodevice engineered at molecular level integrates various desired properties in a smart and coordinated way, and can “switch on” or “turn off” certain functionalities as required. Importantly, it can break through complex physiological barriers, and then precisely ferry potent toxic triptolide into tumor cells in vivo, thus significantly maximizing the therapeutic efficacy and reducing the drug toxicity.

    6. Non-Basic High-Performance Molecules for Solution-Processed Organic Solar Cells (pages 3646–3649)

      Thomas S. van der Poll, John A. Love, Thuc-Quyen Nguyen and Guillermo C. Bazan

      Article first published online: 6 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201127

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new small molecule, p-DTS(FBTTh2)2, is designed for incorporation into solution-fabricated high-efficiency organic solar cells. Of primary importance is the incorporation of electron poor heterocycles that are not prone to protonation and thereby enable the incorporation of commonly used interlayers between the organic semiconductor and the charge collecting electrodes. These features have led to the creation of p-DTS(FBTTh2)2/PC71BM solar cells with power conversion efficiencies of up to 7%.

    7. Mosaic Hydrogels: One-Step Formation of Multiscale Soft Materials (pages 3650–3658)

      Lian Leng, Arianna McAllister, Boyang Zhang, Milica Radisic and Axel Günther

      Article first published online: 20 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201442

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The one-step, continuous formation of mosaic hydrogel sheets is presented. A microfluidic device allows controllable incorporation of secondary biopolymers within a flowing biopolymer sheet followed by a cross-linking step that retains the microscale composition. Information is encoded; mosaic stiffness and diffusivity patterns are created; tessellations are populated with biomolecules, microparticles and viable primary cells; and 3D soft material assemblies are demonstrated.

    8. Multistage pH-Responsive Liposomes for Mitochondrial-Targeted Anticancer Drug Delivery (pages 3659–3665)

      Ran Mo, Qiong Sun, Jingwei Xue, Nan Li, Wenyuan Li, Can Zhang and Qineng Ping

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201498

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Zwitterionic oligopeptide liposomes (HHG2C18-L) containing a smart lipid (1,5-dioctadecyl-L-glutamyl 2-histidyl-hexahydrobenzoic acid, HHG2C18) are developed to overcome the barriers faced by anticancer drugs on the route from the site of injection into the body to the final antitumor target within transport steps with multiple physiological and biological barriers. HHG2C18-L show the multistage pH-responsive to the tumor cell (the mitochondria in this case). Their multistage pH response leads to more effective entry of the tumor cell, improved escape from the endolysosomes, and accumulation at the mitochondria (see picture).

    9. On-Demand Separation of Oil-Water Mixtures (pages 3666–3671)

      Gibum Kwon, Arun. K. Kota, Yongxin Li, Ameya Sohani, Joseph M. Mabry and Anish Tuteja

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201364

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In this work, the first-ever membrane-based single unit operation that enables gravity driven, on-demand separation of various oil-water mixtures is developed. Using this methodology, the on-demand separation of free oil and water, oil-in-water emulsions, and water-in-oil emulsions is demonstrated, with ≥99.9% separation efficiency. A scaled-up apparatus to separate larger quantities (several liters) of oil-water emulsions is also developed.

    10. High Response Piezoelectric and Piezoresistive Materials for Fast, Low Voltage Switching: Simulation and Theory of Transduction Physics at the Nanometer-Scale (pages 3672–3677)

      Dennis M. Newns, Bruce G. Elmegreen, Xiao-Hu Liu and Glenn J. Martyna

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104617

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      Field effect transistors are reaching the limits imposed by the scaling of materials and the electrostatic gating physics underlying the device. In this Communication, a new type of switch based on different physics, which combines known piezoelectric and piezoresistive materials, is described and is shown by theory and simulation to achieve gigahertz digital switching at low voltage (0.1 V).

    11. Dithienocoronenediimide-Based Copolymers as Novel Ambipolar Semiconductors for Organic Thin-Film Transistors (pages 3678–3684)

      Hakan Usta, Christopher Newman, Zhihua Chen and Antonio Facchetti

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201014

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new class of ambipolar donor-acceptor π-conjugated polymers based on a dithienocoronenediimide core is presented. Solution-processed top-gate/bottom-contact thin film transistors (TFTs) exhibit electron and hole mobilities of up to 0.30 cm2/V·s and 0.04 cm2/V·s, respectively, which are the highest reported to date for an ambipolar polymer in ambient conditions. The polymers presented here are the first examples of coronenediimide-based semiconductors showing high organic TFT performances.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. Sensors: A Quasi-Liquid Iontronic–Electronic Light-Harvesting Hybrid Photodetector with Giant Response (Adv. Mater. 27/2012) (page 3685)

      Lily Mandal, Meenal Deo, Ashish Yengantiwar, Arun Banpurkar, Jyoti Jog and Satishchandra Ogale

      Article first published online: 10 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290164

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The image depicts a novel device architecture composed of ZnO nanorods with surface-dispensed agarose-gel as a quasiliquid iontronic-electronic light-harvesting hybrid photodetector. On page 3686, S. Ogale and co-workers show that this configuration exhibits a three orders of magnitude stronger photoresponse and a shorter response time as compared to the bare ZnO nanorod-based device. Moreover, this response has an extended tail in the visible region.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Frontispiece
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    1. A Quasi-Liquid Iontronic–Electronic Light-Harvesting Hybrid Photodetector with Giant Response (pages 3686–3691)

      Lily Mandal, Meenal Deo, Ashish Yengantiwar, Arun Banpurkar, Jyoti Jog and Satishchandra Ogale

      Article first published online: 8 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200613

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A heterostructure formed by a layer of agarose gel drop-cast on a hydrothermally grown layer of ZnO nanorods on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO)-coated glass is examined for photoresponse with a top platinum tip contact. This ionic-gel-based hybrid device shows three orders of magnitude higher photocurrent as compared to the case of bare ZnO nanorods film.

    2. The Design and Synthesis of Hard and Impermeable, Yet Flexible, Conformal Organic Coatings (pages 3692–3696)

      Jingjing Xu, Ayse Asatekin and Karen K. Gleason

      Article first published online: 12 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201197

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      A new design paradigm for conformal, all-organic coatings that retain their flexibility and chemical functionality while displaying exceptional mechanical hardness and barrier properties is presented. Initiated chemical vapor deposition is used to synthesize a novel alternating copolymer thin film. Upon annealing, films display elastic moduli exceeding 20 GPa, excellent scratch resistance and flexibility, and very low oxygen permeability.

    3. Superhydrophobic Surfaces with Photocatalytic Self-Cleaning Properties by Nanocomposite Coating of TiO2 and Polytetrafluoroethylene (pages 3697–3700)

      Takashi Kamegawa, Yuki Shimizu and Hiromi Yamashita

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201037

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Superhydrophobic surfaces with photocatalytic self-cleaning properties are designed through coating a nanocomposite TiO2 photocatalyst and hydrophobic polytetrafluoroethylene onto a structured substrate by applying a co-deposition technique. This coating realizes adequate photocatalytic activity for self-cleaning and inducing unique surface wettability changes. The nanocomposite can contain multiple functions, enabling energy-saving and maintenance-free characteristics.

    4. Self-Replenishing Surfaces (pages 3701–3704)

      T. Dikić, W. Ming, R. A. T. M. van Benthem, A. C. C. Esteves and G. de With

      Article first published online: 14 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200807

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Damaged surfaces self-replenish their chemical composition by the spontaneous re-orientation of functional groups chemically bonded to the polymer network. The repair of the surface chemistry leads to the recovery of surface functionality. This self-replenishing approach is suitable to recover many surface-related properties and constitutes a major breakthrough in extending the service life-time of functional materials.

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