Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 28

Special Issue: Materials for Drug Delivery: Innovative Solutions to Address Complex Biological Hurdles

July 24, 2012

Volume 24, Issue 28

Pages 3709–3894

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Research News
    1. Biomolecular Materials: Self-Assembled Peptide Amphiphile Micelles Containing a Cytotoxic T-Cell Epitope Promote a Protective Immune Response In Vivo (Adv. Mater. 28/2012) (page 3709)

      Matthew Black, Amanda Trent, Yulia Kostenko, Joseph Saeyong Lee, Colleen Olive and Matthew Tirrell

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290170

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      Peptide amphiphiles, synthesized by conjugating bioactive peptides to hydrophobic dialkyl tails, have been developed as a modular platform for immunotherapy, as discussed by M. Black, A. Trent and co-workers on page 3845. The image (by Peter Allen at UCSB) illustrates how the amphiphiles self-assemble into dynamic micellar structures in which many copies of peptide antigens are presented on the micelle periphery. Unlike peptides alone, the micelles, without any additional adjuvant, promote peptide-specific immune responses in vivo.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Research News
    1. Lipid Nanoparticles: Peptide Targeted Lipid Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery (Adv. Mater. 28/2012) (page 3710)

      Timothy R. Pearce, Kamlesh Shroff and Efrosini Kokkoli

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290171

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      Nanoparticles reach the tumor through the “leaky” tumor vasculature that allows the transfer of large molecules out of the blood stream. Once in the tumor microenvironment targeting peptides on the surface of the nanoparticles allow specific binding by tumor-cell receptors and subsequent cell internalization. On page 3803, E. Kokkoli and co-workers review the recent strategies used to create peptide-targeted lipid nano-particles to improve cancer therapy.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Research News
    1. Microgels: Nanoemulsion Composite Microgels for Orthogonal Encapsulation and Release (Adv. Mater. 28/2012) (page 3895)

      Harry Z. An, Matthew E. Helgeson and Patrick S. Doyle

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290172

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      Synthesis of shape- and chemically-anisotropic nano-emulsion-laden microgels is reported by P. S. Doyle and co-workers on page 3838. The particles are capable of encapsulation and release of both hydrophobic and hydrophilic species using multiple orthogonal methods from a single particle, enabling new hierarchical strategies for controlled storage and delivery of small molecules and bioactives.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Research News
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 28/2012)

      Version of Record online: 17 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290173

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Research News
  6. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Research News
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  7. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Research News
    1. Engineering Nano- and Microparticles to Tune Immunity (pages 3724–3746)

      James J. Moon, Bonnie Huang and Darrell J. Irvine

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200446

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      Synthetic microparticles and nanoparticles engineered to sense, stimulate, or suppress immune reactions by interactions with immune cells are leading to new therapeutic strategies to deliver vaccines, promote immune responses against tumors, and suppress autoimmunity. This report describes recent progress in the design of microparticles and nanoparticles for immunotherapies and diagnostics.

  8. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Research News
    1. Peptides as Targeting Elements and Tissue Penetration Devices for Nanoparticles (pages 3747–3756)

      Erkki Ruoslahti

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200454

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      Nanoparticles that are essentially passive delivery vehicles carrying drugs and imaging agents are used clinically. New designs can greatly enhance the performance of nanoparticles by incorporating new functions into them. This review discusses engineering of an ability of nanoparticles to actively home to vascular “zip codes” in target tissues and penetrate into cells and tissues within the target.

    2. Biomimetic Delivery with Micro- and Nanoparticles (pages 3757–3778)

      Stephen C. Balmert and Steven R. Little

      Version of Record online: 23 APR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200224

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      Micro- and nanoparticles can serve as templates for imitating interactions between living cells. In particular, controlled release of soluble factors, presentation of surface-bound ligands, and physical properties of particles, such as size, shape, and stiffness can each serve as contextual information that can be interpreted by cells, much like prose and context of interpersonal communication between two human beings.

    3. Hybrid Nanoparticles for Detection and Treatment of Cancer (pages 3779–3802)

      Michael J. Sailor and Ji-Ho Park

      Version of Record online: 21 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200653

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      Hybrid nanoparticles (consisting of more than one type of nanostructure) for the detection and treatment of cancer are reviewed. Functional nanocomponents such as metal nanoparticles, magnetic nanocrystals, or quantum dots can be placed either on the surface of a structural nanocomponent (“barge”) or into its inner space (“tanker”). The structural components are classified based on the therapeutic function they deliver.

    4. Peptide Targeted Lipid Nanoparticles for Anticancer Drug Delivery (pages 3803–3822)

      Timothy R. Pearce, Kamlesh Shroff and Efrosini Kokkoli

      Version of Record online: 5 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200832

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      Lipid-based nanoparticles can effectively encapsulate a wide range of anticancer drugs. The surface of these nanoparticles can be modified with peptides and polymers to enhance the delivery of their encapsulated drug to cancer cells and tumors. In this review we discuss the recent strategies used to create peptide-targeted lipid nanoparticles to improve cancer therapy.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Research News
    1. Nanoparticle Shape Improves Delivery: Rational Coarse Grain Molecular Dynamics (rCG-MD) of Taxol in Worm-Like PEG-PCL Micelles (pages 3823–3830)

      Sharon M. Loverde, Michael L. Klein and Dennis E. Discher

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2011 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103192

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      Nanoparticle shape can improve drug delivery based on the surprising effectiveness of flexible, worm-like nanocarriers (Worms) that increase the amount of drug delivered to tumors and shrink the tumors more effectively than spherical micelles (Spheres). Here, all-atom molecular dynamics (MD) simulations are used to build a rational coarse grain (rCG) model that helps clarify shape-dependent effects in delivery of the widely used anti-cancer drug Taxol by block copolymer micelles.

    2. Plasmonic Nanobubbles Enhance Efficacy and Selectivity of Chemotherapy Against Drug-Resistant Cancer Cells (pages 3831–3837)

      Ekaterina Y. Lukianova-Hleb, Xiaoyang Ren, Joseph A. Zasadzinski, Xiangwei Wu and Dmitri O. Lapotko

      Version of Record online: 7 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201103550

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      Plasmonic nanobubbles, new multifunctional cellular nano-agents, are selectively generated in target cancer cells with a short near-infrared laser pulse. The enhanced cellular specificity and tunable transient nature of plasmonic nanobubbles provide fast, efficient and selective dual therapeutic effects: intracellular delivery of a drug and direct mechanical destruction of cells while sparing normal cells, and reduce drug dose and overcome drug-resistance of cancer cells.

    3. Nanoemulsion Composite Microgels for Orthogonal Encapsulation and Release (pages 3838–3844)

      Harry Z. An, Matthew E. Helgeson and Patrick S. Doyle

      Version of Record online: 26 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200214

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Crosslinkable nanoemulsions are combined with flow lithography for the synthesis of structured composite microgels with controlled hydrophobic compartments. The microgels are used to demonstrate a number of motifs for controlled encapsulation and release of active compounds, including small molecules, proteins, and nanoparticles, from a single material platform.

    4. Self-Assembled Peptide Amphiphile Micelles Containing a Cytotoxic T-Cell Epitope Promote a Protective Immune Response In Vivo (pages 3845–3849)

      Matthew Black, Amanda Trent, Yulia Kostenko, Joseph Saeyong Lee, Colleen Olive and Matthew Tirrell

      Version of Record online: 2 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200209

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      A model cytotoxic T-cell epitope is linked to a synthetic lipid tail, forming a peptide amphiphile that self-assembles into cylindrical micelles. The micelles are capable of inducing a cytotoxic T-cell response in mice that slows the growth of tumors expressing the tumor antigen.

    5. Multicompartmental Particles for Combined Imaging and siRNA Delivery (pages 3850–3856)

      Asish C Misra, Srijanani Bhaskar, Nicholas Clay and Joerg Lahann

      Version of Record online: 14 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200372

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      Multifunctional, multicompartmental particles can be fabricated by electrohydrodynamic co-jetting, capable of both imaging and siRNA delivery. These particles are able to sense and respond to the endosomal environment allowing for effective delivery of siRNA.

    6. Synthesis and Characterization of Janus Gold Nanoparticles (pages 3857–3863)

      Hyewon Kim, Randy P. Carney, Javier Reguera, Quy K. Ong, Xiang Liu and Francesco Stellacci

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200926

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      When gold nanoparticles are coated with binary mixtures of dislike ligand molecules, separation in the ligand shell occurs; if the particles are smaller than a threshold size the separation is solely enthalpy driven leading to the spontaneous formation of Janus particles.

    7. Platelet Mimetic Particles for Targeting Thrombi in Flowing Blood (pages 3864–3869)

      Nishit Doshi, Jennifer N. Orje, Blanca Molins, Jeffrey W. Smith, Samir Mitragotri and Zaverio M. Ruggeri

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200607

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      Platelets are a paradigm for a drug carrier in blood owing to their unique physical and biochemical properties. Here, we report the development of synthetic particles that mimic several physical features and important functional properties of platelets. These synthetic platelets have therapeutic and diagnostic applications for platelet associated disorders.

  10. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Communications
    11. Research News
    1. X-Space MPI: Magnetic Nanoparticles for Safe Medical Imaging (pages 3870–3877)

      Patrick William Goodwill, Emine Ulku Saritas, Laura Rose Croft, Tyson N. Kim, Kannan M. Krishnan, David V. Schaffer and Steven M. Conolly

      Version of Record online: 19 MAR 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200221

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      Magnetic particle imaging (MPI) is an emerging medical imaging technique that could be a safer alternative to X-ray and CT using iodinated contrast agents, especially for patients with chronic kidney disease. Here we describe the overall technique, detail the latest advances in MPI theory, and discuss the optimal nanoparticle characteristics for MPI. We also show images taken using our latest MPI hardware, demonstrating MPI's already superb contrast and high sensitivity.

    2. Biologically Responsive Polymeric Nanoparticles for Drug Delivery (pages 3878–3886)

      Yolonda L. Colson and Mark W. Grinstaff

      Version of Record online: 9 MAY 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200420

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      Responsive nanoparticles that release their drug cargo in accordance with a change in pH or oxidative stress enable the opportunity to link drug delivery to a specific location and/or disease state.

    3. Mucus Penetrating Nanoparticles: Biophysical Tool and Method of Drug and Gene Delivery (pages 3887–3894)

      Laura M. Ensign, Craig Schneider, Jung Soo Suk, Richard Cone and Justin Hanes

      Version of Record online: 20 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201800

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      Thick, sticky mucus layers have limited the effectiveness of drug and gene delivery to mucosal tissues. The development of “mucus-penetrating nanoparticles,” shown in red in a mouse vagina (tissue labeled blue), including the deep folds or rugae, has provided a tool for the non-destructive evaluation of the nanoscale barrier properties of human and animal mucus secretions, and has been shown to provide a method for achieving more uniform and longer-lasting drug and gene delivery to mucosal surfaces.

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