Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 36

Special Issue: Materials Research at Rice University

September 18, 2012

Volume 24, Issue 36

Pages 4773–5013

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    1. Materials Research at Rice University: Materials Research at Rice University (Adv. Mater. 36/2012) (page 4773)

      Pulickel M. Ajayan and Edwin L. Thomas

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290218

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      On the cover of this special issue is Lovett Hall, the first building erected on the campus of Rice University in Houston, which celebrates the centenary of its founding in 1912. The owl is the university's mascot, chosen as the symbol of wisdom. The hexagonal pattern represents the lattice structure of the graphitic carbon honeycomb, the building block of many carbon nanostructures, including the fullerene (owl eyes), carbon nanotube (bar on which the owl perches) and graphene (owl body).

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    1. Plasmonic Materials: A Plethora of Plasmonics from the Laboratory for Nanophotonics at Rice University (Adv. Mater. 36/2012) (page 4774)

      Naomi J. Halas, Surbhi Lal, Stephan Link, Wei-Shun Chang, Douglas Natelson, Jason H. Hafner and Peter Nordlander

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290219

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plasmonic materials have properties that arise from their hybridized plasmons, a rigorous analogy with the molecular orbitals of quantum systems – a principle discovered at the Laboratory for Nanophotonics at Rice. The ensuing creation of plasmonic-nanostructure based media by a variety of synthesis and fabrication methods is resulting in a proliferation of new plasmonic materials and effects identified through both discovery and design. Further details can be found on p. 4842 in a review by Naomi Halas and co-workers.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    1. Functional Gold Nanorods: Functional Gold Nanorods: Synthesis, Self-Assembly, and Sensing Applications (Adv. Mater. 36/2012) (page 5016)

      Leonid Vigderman, Bishnu P. Khanal and Eugene R. Zubarev

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290220

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      The interior of the letters R-I-C-E on the back cover image contains a hydrophilic silicon oxide surface, whereas the background is coated with a hydrophobic film of a photoresist. Gold nanorods coated with a CTAB bilayer selectively accumulate in the hydrophilic letters when their aqueous solution is cast on the patterned substrate. The synthesis, self-assembly and sensing applications of functional gold nanorods are reviewed in detail by Eugene Zubarev and co-workers on p. 4811.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 36/2012)

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290221

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 36/2012) (pages 4775–4778)

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290217

  6. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    1. You have free access to this content
      Materials Research at Rice University (pages 4780–4781)

      Pulickel M. Ajayan and Edwin L. Thomas

      Article first published online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201203152

  7. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Reviews
    1. Micro-/Nanostructured Mechanical Metamaterials (pages 4782–4810)

      Jae-Hwang Lee, Jonathan P. Singer and Edwin L. Thomas

      Article first published online: 17 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201644

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      We review mechanical metamaterials made from micro-/nano-structured materials that possess extraordinary effective properties, such as negative dynamic modulus, phononic bandgaps, high specific energy absorption, and unusual heat transport. Potential fabrication tools and selected characterization methods are described as well as some prospects for the future developments in this exciting and emerging field.

    2. Functional Gold Nanorods: Synthesis, Self-Assembly, and Sensing Applications (pages 4811–4841)

      Leonid Vigderman, Bishnu P. Khanal and Eugene R. Zubarev

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201690

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      The synthesis, self-assembly, and sensing applications of functional gold nanorods is reviewed. The SEM image on the left shows near-monodisperse gold nanorods organized by evaporative selfassembly. Both parallel and perpendicular alignment of nanorods with respect to the surface of the substrate is visible.

    3. A Plethora of Plasmonics from the Laboratory for Nanophotonics at Rice University (pages 4842–4877)

      Naomi J. Halas, Surbhi Lal, Stephan Link, Wei-Shun Chang, Douglas Natelson, Jason H. Hafner and Peter Nordlander

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202331

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plasmonic materials have properties arising from their hybridized plasmons, a rigorous analogy with the molecular orbitals of quantum systems – a principle discovered at the Laboratory for Nanophotonics at Rice. The ensuing creation of plasmonic-nanostructure-based media by a variety of synthesis and fabrication methods is resulting in a proliferation of new plasmonic materials and effects identified through both discovery and design.

    4. Binary and Ternary Atomic Layers Built from Carbon, Boron, and Nitrogen (pages 4878–4895)

      Li Song, Zheng Liu, Arava Leela Mohana Reddy, Narayanan Tharangattu Narayanan, Jaime Taha-Tijerina, Juan Peng, Guanhui Gao, Jun Lou, Robert Vajtai and Pulickel M. Ajayan

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201792

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      Recent progress on the synthesis, characterization, fabrication, property measurements and applications of in-plane and vertically grown BCN atomic layers and their nanostructures is briefly reviewed. They show a rich variety of physical properties that enable numerous possible technological applications in the fields of nanoelectronics, optical devices, field emission, catalysis, energy technology, lubrication, and gas storage.

    5. Strongly Correlated Materials (pages 4896–4923)

      Emilia Morosan, Douglas Natelson, Andriy H. Nevidomskyy and Qimiao Si

      Article first published online: 15 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202018

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      The relative importance of electron-electron interactions, U, compared with the kinetic energy in the form of the bandwidth, D, delineates between weakly and strongly correlated materials. We discuss several types of strongly correlated materials, higlighting their rich physics and diverse properties. Our improved understanding of these systems opens the exciting possibility of controlling and applying their fascinating phases.

    6. New Routes to Graphene, Graphene Oxide and Their Related Applications (pages 4924–4955)

      Yu Zhu, Dustin K. James and James M. Tour

      Article first published online: 20 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202321

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      Recent research has focused on graphene materials such as graphene nanoribbons (left) and pristine graphene oxide (right). Synthetic protocols for producing graphene materials are rapidly advancing, with applications in transparent conductive membranes, fibers and coatings, oil field fluids and many other commercially viable uses. This review is a summary of graphene materials endeavors.

    7. Unfolding the Fullerene: Nanotubes, Graphene and Poly-Elemental Varieties by Simulations (pages 4956–4976)

      Evgeni S. Penev, Vasilii I. Artyukhov, Feng Ding and Boris I. Yakobson

      Article first published online: 14 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202322

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      Theoretical and computational models towards understanding the key structures and behaviors in the immense diversity of carbon allotropes are reviewed. The image shows a B80 buckyball, born in computer simulations, and its highlighted planar unfolding mapped onto the matching, theoretically hypothesized structure for a two-dimensional boron layer.

    8. Optoelectronic Properties of Single-Wall Carbon Nanotubes (pages 4977–4994)

      Sébastien Nanot, Erik H. Hároz, Ji-Hee Kim, Robert H. Hauge and Junichiro Kono

      Article first published online: 22 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201751

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      Single-wall carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) provide an ideal laboratory for the exploration of novel 1D physics as well as quantum-engineered architectures for optoelectronic applications. Here, recent progress in optical spectroscopic studies of SWCNTs is reviewed. Recent progress in post-growth separation methods allows different species of SWCNTs to be sorted out in bulk quantities and chirality-dependent properties to be studied using standard macroscopic measurements.

    9. Building Bridges: Leveraging Interdisciplinary Collaborations in the Development of Biomaterials to Meet Clinical Needs (pages 4995–5013)

      Eliza L. S. Fong, Brendan M. Watson, F. Kurtis Kasper and Antonios G. Mikos

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201762

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      This review highlights collaborative advances in biomaterials research from the Mikos laboratory in the areas of scaffold development, drug delivery, and gene therapy, especially as related to applications in bone and cartilage tissue engineering.

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