Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 37

September 25, 2012

Volume 24, Issue 37

Pages 5017–5141

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    1. Graphene: Macroscopic 3D Nanographene with Dynamically Tunable Bulk Properties (Adv. Mater. 37/2012) (page 5017)

      Juergen Biener, Subho Dasgupta, Lihua Shao, Di Wang, Marcus A. Worsley, Arne Wittstock, Jonathan R. I. Lee, Monika M. Biener, Christine A. Orme, Sergei O. Kucheyev, Brandon C. Wood, Trevor M. Willey, Alex V. Hamza, Jörg Weissmüller, Horst Hahn and Theodore F. Baumann

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290225

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The front cover image represents the threedimensional structure of a new polymer-derived nanographene bulk material that consists of a three-dimensional network of single-layer graphene nanoplatelets. The material is mechanically robust and combines a graphene-like surface area with an open macroporosity thus allowing one to dynamically control its macroscopic properties through ion-induced interfacial electric fields. More details can be found in the article by Juergen Biener and co-workers on page 5083.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    1. Nanopores: A Novel Self-Ordered Sub-10 nm Nanopore Template for Nanotechnology (Adv. Mater. 37/2012) (page 5018)

      Eric Moyen, Lionel Santinacci, Laurence Masson, Wulf Wulfhekel and Margrit Hanbücken

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290226

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A wafer scale self-ordered array of high aspect ratio alumina nanopores with low porosity is obtained by anodization of aluminum. On page 5094, Margit Hanbücken, Eric Moyen, and co-workers show how the understanding of alumina pore nucleation enables the pore diameter control down to less than 10 nm. Such a material can be used as a template to fabricate sub-10 nm zero- and one-dimensional objects of a wide range of materials, meeting challenging applications in magnetic read heads or electrical DNA sequencing.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    1. Assymetric Nano-objects: True Bulk Synthesis of Janus Objects by Bipolar Electrochemistry (Adv. Mater. 37/2012) (page 5144)

      Gabriel Loget, Jérome Roche and Alexander Kuhn

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290227

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Janus particles are synthesized in a straightforward way based on a bulk phase reaction. As reported by Alexander Kuhn and co-workers on page 5111, the developed method leads to selective modification of one side of conducting micro- and nano-objects with a well-defined metal or metal halide layer. The described reactor allows scaling-up the production of such asymmetric particles, which are of interest for a wide variety of potential applications, ranging from electronic paper to catalysis.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 37/2012)

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290228

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 37/2012) (pages 5019–5023)

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290222

  6. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    1. Towards High-Performance Bioinspired Composites (pages 5024–5044)

      André R. Studart

      Article first published online: 13 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201471

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Combining the design principles of biological materials rather than their structure per se with the rich chemistry of synthetic systems will pave our way towards the development of high-performance bioinspired composites with unprecedented properties and functionalities.

  7. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    1. Hybrid Nanostructures for Energy Storage Applications (pages 5045–5064)

      Arava Leela Mohana Reddy, Sanketh R. Gowda, Manikoth M. Shaijumon and Pulickel M. Ajayan

      Article first published online: 28 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201104502

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Hybrid nanostructured materials are currently studied as promising energy storage materials due to their significance to both scientific fundamentals and potential applications. Some of the recent progresses in the synthesis of different types of hybrid nanostructures and recent research efforts in utilizing them to enhance the electrochemical energy storage properties of various devices including supercapacitors, Li-ion battery and three-dimensional microbatteries are discussed.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    1. A Mesoporous Anisotropic n-Type Bi2Te3 Monolith with Low Thermal Conductivity as an Efficient Thermoelectric Material (pages 5065–5070)

      Yichi Zhang, Tristan Day, Matthew L. Snedaker, Heng Wang, Stephan Krämer, Christina S. Birkel, Xiulei Ji, Deyu Liu, G. Jeffrey Snyder and Galen D. Stucky

      Article first published online: 23 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201974

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A mesoporous Bi2Te3 monolith with ≈20% porosity is fabricated by hot-pressing mesoporous powders. The mesostructures are able to transport carriers and scatter phonons efficiently. The reduction (≈60%) of the thermal conductivity is sufficient to compensate for the loss of electrical conductivity perpendicular to the direction of applied pressure, leading to an enhanced zT of 0.7, highest among all reported self-doped, n-type Bi2Te3 at similar temperatures.

    2. Highly Stretchable Alkaline Batteries Based on an Embedded Conductive Fabric (pages 5071–5076)

      Abhinav M. Gaikwad, Alla M. Zamarayeva, Jamesley Rousseau, Howie Chu, Irving Derin and Daniel A Steingart

      Article first published online: 3 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201329

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A stretchable alkaline battery based on a embedded stretchable silver fabric is fabricated with an open circuit potential (OCV) of 1.5 V and capacity of 3.775 mAh/cm2. No drop in discharge capacity is observed with strain up to 100%. Two batteries connected in series continued to power a red LED even when stretched to 150% and twisted by 90 degrees.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    1. Microspheres: Synthesis of Monodispersed Microspheres from Laplace Pressure Induced Droplets in Micromolds (Adv. Mater. 37/2012) (page 5077)

      Chang-Hyung Choi, Jae-Min Jeong, Sung-Min Kang, Chang-Soo Lee and Jinkee Lee

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290223

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel synthesis method for microspheres using micromolds based on the Laplace pressure difference is presented by Jinkee Lee, Chang-Soo Lee, and co-workers on page 5078. This simple micromolding technique makes it possible to synthesize highly monodispersed microspheres with the flexibility of various reaction schemes, such as photopolymerization, sol-gel reactions, and colloidal assembly. This method is promising for the mass production of various sizes of monodispersed microspheres without the need for complicated control of fluids.

  10. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    1. Synthesis of Monodispersed Microspheres from Laplace Pressure Induced Droplets in Micromolds (pages 5078–5082)

      Chang-Hyung Choi, Jae-Min Jeong, Sung-Min Kang, Chang-Soo Lee and Jinkee Lee

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200843

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel synthesis method for microspheres using micromolds based on the Laplace pressure difference is presented. This simple micromolding technique shows flexibility to synthesize particles using various reaction schemes, such as photopolymerization, sol-gel reactions, and colloidal assembly. This method can produce highly monodispersed spherical particles, without the need to use complicated control. It allows high flexibility in choosing materials and size control.

    2. Macroscopic 3D Nanographene with Dynamically Tunable Bulk Properties (pages 5083–5087)

      Juergen Biener, Subho Dasgupta, Lihua Shao, Di Wang, Marcus A. Worsley, Arne Wittstock, Jonathan R. I. Lee, Monika M. Biener, Christine A. Orme, Sergei O. Kucheyev, Brandon C. Wood, Trevor M. Willey, Alex V. Hamza, Jörg Weissmüller, Horst Hahn and Theodore F. Baumann

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202289

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polymer-derived, monolithic three-dimensional nanographene (3D-NG) bulk material with tunable properties is produced by a simple and inexpensive approach. The material is mass-producible, and combines chemical inertness and mechanical strength with a hierarchical porous architecture and a graphene-like surface area. This provides an opportunity to control its electron transport and mechanical properties dynamically by means of electrochemical-induced interfacial electric fields.

    3. Local Electronic Properties of Corrugated Silicene Phases (pages 5088–5093)

      Daniele Chiappe, Carlo Grazianetti, Grazia Tallarida, Marco Fanciulli and Alessandro Molle

      Article first published online: 30 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202100

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The structural and electronic properties of silicene nanosheets epitaxially grown on Ag(111) are systematically investigated by combining scanning tunneling microscopy and scanning tunneling spectroscopy. By carefully tuning the growth parameters, complex 2D silicon structures are obtained, which evidence the presence of corrugated silicene domains. Local modifications of the density of states are observed throughout reconstructed silicene domains and are attributed to the symmetry breaking induced by the interactions with the Ag lattice, in analogy with the case of graphene.

    4. A Novel Self-Ordered Sub-10 nm Nanopore Template for Nanotechnology (pages 5094–5098)

      Eric Moyen, Lionel Santinacci, Laurence Masson, Wulf Wulfhekel and Margrit Hanbücken

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200648

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The fabrication of cost-efficient wafer scale self-ordered arrays of vertical and insulating sub-10 nm nanopores with low porosity is demonstrated. These meet challenging applications like read heads with perpendicular to the plane giant magnetoresistance, calling for strongly localized currents. Purely electrical sequencing of DNA strands, requiring insulating membranes with reduced pore diameters can also be considered.

    5. Highly Efficient and Stable Red Phosphorescent Organic Light-Emitting Diodes Using Platinum Complexes (pages 5099–5103)

      Hirohiko Fukagawa, Takahisa Shimizu, Hiromu Hanashima, Yoshichika Osada, Mitsunori Suzuki and Hideo Fujikake

      Article first published online: 13 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202167

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Highly efficient and stable, red phosphorescent organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are demonstrated using platinum complexes. The host/dopant combination is a crucial factor in obtaining high efficiency and stability. The OLEDs exhibit a maximum external quantum efficiency of about 20% and an expected half-life of about 10 000 h with an initial luminance of 1000 cd m−2.

    6. Light-Triggered Theranostics Based on Photosensitizer-Conjugated Carbon Dots for Simultaneous Enhanced-Fluorescence Imaging and Photodynamic Therapy (pages 5104–5110)

      Peng Huang, Jing Lin, Xiansong Wang, Zhe Wang, Chunlei Zhang, Meng He, Kan Wang, Feng Chen, Zhiming Li, Guangxia Shen, Daxiang Cui and Xiaoyuan Chen

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200650

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Novel theranostics based on photosensitizer-conjugated carbon dots is reported. The prepared C-dots–Ce6 has good stability and high water dispersibility and solubility, non-cytotoxicity, good biocompatibility, enhanced photosensitizer fluorescence detection and remarkable photodynamic efficacy upon irradiation. The C-dots–Ce6 conjugate is a good candidate with excellent imaging and tumor-homing ability for NIR fluorescence imaging monitored PDT treatment.

    7. True Bulk Synthesis of Janus Objects by Bipolar Electrochemistry (pages 5111–5116)

      Gabriel Loget, Jérome Roche and Alexander Kuhn

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201623

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Janus particles have different features/chemistry on two opposite sides (see figure). So far, they have been obtained mainly by two-dimensional synthetic methods, which are able to break the symmetry but limit the amount of produced particles. A true bulk approach, based on bipolar electrochemistry, is presented that allows the straightforward synthesis of such asymmetric micro- and nano-objects.

    8. Highly Conductive and Stretchable Silver Nanowire Conductors (pages 5117–5122)

      Feng Xu and Yong Zhu

      Article first published online: 12 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201886

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A highly conductive and stretchable conductor with silver nanowires (AgNWs) embedded just below the surface of poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) is fabricated. Stable conductivity of 5285 S cm−1 is achieved in a large range of tensile strain (0–50%) after a few cycles of stretching/releasing of the substrate. This stable electric response is due to buckling of the AgNW/PDMS thin layer, which is attributed to irreversible sliding of the AgNWs in the PDMS matrix. AgNWs can be printed to fabricate patterned stretchable conductors with feature size as small as 50 μm.

  11. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    1. Low Temperature Casting of Graphene with High Compressive Strength (Adv. Mater. 37/2012) (page 5123)

      Hengchang Bi, Kuibo Yin, Xiao Xie, Yilong Zhou, Neng Wan, Feng Xu, Florian Banhart, Litao Sun and Rodney S. Ruoff

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290224

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      On page 5124, Rodney S. Ruoff, Litao Sun, and co-workers report a pH-mediated hydrothermal reduction and moulding of graphene oxide to realize high density (up to 1.6 g/cm3), compact 3-D graphene macrostructures with desired shapes. The present structures have a compressive strength of 361 MPa (6 times higher than conventional graphite products). This technique may contribute new products for, e.g., the graphite and other industries

  12. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Review
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Frontispiece
    13. Communications
    1. Low Temperature Casting of Graphene with High Compressive Strength (pages 5124–5129)

      Hengchang Bi, Kuibo Yin, Xiao Xie, Yilong Zhou, Neng Wan, Feng Xu, Florian Banhart, Litao Sun and Rodney S. Ruoff

      Article first published online: 6 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201519

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This paper reports a pH-mediated hydrothermal reduction method that combines with moulding methods, allowing controllable fabrication of high density (up to 1.6 g cm−3) isotropic graphene macrostructures with various shapes. This “graphene” (CG) has a compressive strength of 361 MPa (6 times higher than conventional graphite products) and electrical conductivity of 7.6 S cm−1. The processing steps are scalable.

    2. Three-Dimensional Nitrogen and Boron Co-doped Graphene for High-Performance All-Solid-State Supercapacitors (pages 5130–5135)

      Zhong-Shuai Wu, Andreas Winter, Long Chen, Yi Sun, Andrey Turchanin, Xinliang Feng and Klaus Müllen

      Article first published online: 16 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201948

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A simplified prototype device of high-performance all-solid-state supercapacitors (ASSSs) based on 3D nitrogen and boron co-doped monolithic graphene aerogels (BN-GAs) is demonstrated for the first time. The resulting ASSSs show high specific capacitance, good rate capability, and enhanced energy density or power density.

    3. Functionalized Graphene Sheets as Molecular Templates for Controlled Nucleation and Self-Assembly of Metal Oxide-Graphene Nanocomposites (pages 5136–5141)

      Xiaolin Li, Wen Qi, Donghai Mei, Maria L. Sushko, Ilhan Aksay and Jun Liu

      Article first published online: 18 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202189

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By using a combination of theoretical and experimental techniques, it is demonstrated that functionalized graphene sheets (FGS) can function as a new class of molecular templates to direct the nucleation, crystalline phase transition, and self-assembly process of surfactant micelles and metal oxides. Novel, three-dimensional FGS-metal oxide nanocomposite materials with an ordered mesoporous structure can be synthesized.

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