Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 39

October 9, 2012

Volume 24, Issue 39

Pages 5277–5397

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correction
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communication
    1. Thermoresponsive Polymers: Thermoresponsive Polymer Induced Sweating Surfaces as an Efficient Way to Passively Cool Buildings (Adv. Mater. 39/2012) (page 5277)

      A. C. C. Rotzetter, C. M. Schumacher, S. B. Bubenhofer, R. N. Grass, L. C. Gerber, M. Zeltner and W. J. Stark

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290239

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      The revolutionary natural concept of sweating is successfully adapted as a sustainable and energyefficient cooling-technology for buildings in urban environments. On page 5352, W. J. Stark and co-workers present low-cost, reversibly thermoresponsive hydrogel-mats enabling an autonomous, bio-inspired sweating-like action on building surfaces with a surface temperature reduction of up to 25 °C under tropical solar irradiance.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correction
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communication
    1. Tissue Engineering: The Design of a Heterocellular 3D Architecture and its Application to Monitoring the Behavior of Cancer Cells in Response to the Spatial Distribution of Endothelial Cells (Adv. Mater. 39/2012) (page 5278)

      Wonjae Lee and Jon Park

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290241

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      Spatial cell distribution is one of the critical features for governing cellular interactions and subsequent cell behaviors. On page 5339, Jon Park and Wonjae Lee suggest a novel method to build a 3D hierarchical cellular structure by stacking cell-attached micro plate structures with specific configurations within hydrogel layers. As a model system, the 3D architecture of a liver lobule, a structural unit of the liver, was reconstructed (red: hepatocytes in a hydrogel layer, green: endothelial cells on a micro plate structure) in which the desired heterocellular interactions were successfully restored.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correction
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communication
    1. Acoustics: Piezoelectric Fibers for Conformal Acoustics (Adv. Mater. 39/2012) (page 5400)

      Noémie Chocat, Guillaume Lestoquoy, Zheng Wang, Daniel M. Rodgers, John D. Joannopoulos and Yoel Fink

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290242

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      Ultrasound transducers have many important applications in medical, industrial, and environmental settings. On page 5327, Yoel Fink and co-workers report the realization of large-active-area piezoelectric fibers, which can be woven into extended and flexible ultrasound transducing fabrics. The back cover depicts a curved grid of piezoelectric fibers, four of which are actuated and emitting a focused acoustic wave.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correction
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communication
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 39/2012)

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290243

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correction
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communication
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 39/2012) (pages 5279–5283)

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290236

  6. Correction

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correction
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communication
    1. You have free access to this content
      Correction: A Hybrid Piezoelectric Structure for Wearable Nanogenerators (page 5283)

      Minbaek Lee, Chih-Yen Chen, Sihong Wang, Seung Nam Cha, Yong Jun Park, Jong Min Kim, Li-Jen Chou and Zhong Lin Wang

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290240

      This article corrects:

      A Hybrid Piezoelectric Structure for Wearable Nanogenerators

      Vol. 24, Issue 13, 1759–1764, Article first published online: 7 MAR 2012

  7. Review

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correction
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communication
    1. Transfer Printing Techniques for Materials Assembly and Micro/Nanodevice Fabrication (pages 5284–5318)

      Andrew Carlson, Audrey M. Bowen, Yonggang Huang, Ralph G. Nuzzo and John A. Rogers

      Article first published online: 31 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201386

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      Transfer printing represents a set of techniques for deterministic assembly of micro- and nanomaterials into spatially organized, functional arrangements. The results provide not only test structures for scientific study, but also routes to high-performance, heterogeneously integrated systems. This article summarizes recent advances in a variety of transfer printing techniques, from mechanics and materials aspects governing the operation, to engineering use in complex systems, to perspectives on high throughput, industrial-scale manufacturing.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correction
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communication
    1. Nanocomposite Nanostructures: CdS–Polymer Nanocomposites and Light-Emitting Fibers by In Situ Electron-Beam Synthesis and Lithography (Adv. Mater. 39/2012) (page 5319)

      Luana Persano, Andrea Camposeo, Francesca Di Benedetto, Ripalta Stabile, Anna M. Laera, Emanuela Piscopiello, Leander Tapfer and Dario Pisignano

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290237

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      Electron-beam scanning is used to realize spatially-controlled in situ synthesis of nanocrystals, as reported by Luana Persano and co-workers on page 5320. A smart combination of complementary nanofabrication approaches including nanoimprinting, electrospinning, and electron-beam decomposition of nanocrystal precursors, and subsequent nucleation of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix, allows the exploitation the most favorable flow conditions of organics to produce various nanocomposite nanostructures.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correction
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communication
    1. CdS–Polymer Nanocomposites and Light-Emitting Fibers by In Situ Electron-Beam Synthesis and Lithography (pages 5320–5326)

      Luana Persano, Andrea Camposeo, Francesca Di Benedetto, Ripalta Stabile, Anna M. Laera, Emanuela Piscopiello, Leander Tapfer and Dario Pisignano

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202440

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      A straightforward, electron-beam induced synthesis and patterning approach to the in situ generation of CdS nanocrystals in nanocomposite films and light-emitting electrospun nanofibers is used. Smartly combining room-temperature nanoimprinting, electrospinning, and electron-beam decomposition of nanocrystal precursors and subsequent nucleation of nanoparticles in a polymer matrix allows exploitation of the most favorable flow conditions of organics to produce various nanocomposite nanostructures.

    2. Piezoelectric Fibers for Conformal Acoustics (pages 5327–5332)

      Noémie Chocat, Guillaume Lestoquoy, Zheng Wang, Daniel M. Rodgers, John D. Joannopoulos and Yoel Fink

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201355

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ultrasound transducers have many important applications in medical, industrial, and environmental settings. Large-active-area piezoelectric fibers are presented here, which can be woven into extended and flexible ultrasound transducing fabrics. This work opens significant opportunities for large-area, flexible and adjustable acoustic emission and sensing for a variety of emerging applications.

    3. Optically Tunable Amino-Functionalized Graphene Quantum Dots (pages 5333–5338)

      Hiroyuki Tetsuka, Ryoji Asahi, Akihiro Nagoya, Kazuo Okamoto, Ichiro Tajima, Riichiro Ohta and Atsuto Okamoto

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201930

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      Amino-functionalized graphene quantum dots (af-GQDs) with discrete molecular weights and specific edges were self-limitedly extracted from oxidized graphene sheet. Their optical properties can be precisely controlled only by the selective and quantitative functionalization at the edge sites. The af-GQDS exhibit bright colorful fluorescence under a single-wavelength excitation.

    4. The Design of a Heterocellular 3D Architecture and its Application to Monitoring the Behavior of Cancer Cells in Response to the Spatial Distribution of Endothelial Cells (pages 5339–5344)

      Wonjae Lee and Jon Park

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200687

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The spatial cell distribution is one of the critical features for governing cellular interactions and their consequent behaviors. Here we suggest a novel method of building a hierarchical cellular structure by stacking cellattached microplate structures with specific configurations within hydrogel layers. This method is applied to the reconstruction of the 3D architecture of a liver lobule and the development of an experimental model of the various phases of cancer angiogenesis.

    5. White-Light Emitting Microtubes of Mixed Organic Charge-Transfer Complexes (pages 5345–5351)

      Yi-Long Lei, Yue Jin, Dong-Ying Zhou, Wei Gu, Xiao-Bo Shi, Liang-Sheng Liao and Shuit-Tong Lee

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201493

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      Self-assembled microtubes of mixed charge-transfer (CT) complexes comprising TCNB and naphthalene can be constructed with pyrene as dopant by an etching-assisted CT-induced interaction. Highly efficient Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) from the excited naphthalene–TCNB to pyrene–TCNB molecules is obtained in mixed CT complex microtubes. White-light emissive CT complex microtubes can be formed by adjusting the dopant concentration and serve as an active optical waveguide.

    6. Thermoresponsive Polymer Induced Sweating Surfaces as an Efficient Way to Passively Cool Buildings (pages 5352–5356)

      A. C. C. Rotzetter, C. M. Schumacher, S. B. Bubenhofer, R. N. Grass, L. C. Gerber, M. Zeltner and W. J. Stark

      Article first published online: 30 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202574

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Buildings can be effectively cooled by a bioinspired sweating-like action based on thermoresponsive hydrogels (PNIPAM), which press out their stored water when exceeding the lower critical solution temperature. The surface temperature is reduced by 15 °C compared to that of a conventional hydrogel (pHEMA) and by 25 °C compared to the bare ground.

    7. Flexible Pyroelectric Nanogenerators using a Composite Structure of Lead-Free KNbO3 Nanowires (pages 5357–5362)

      Ya Yang, Jong Hoon Jung, Byung Kil Yun, Fang Zhang, Ken C. Pradel, Wenxi Guo and Zhong Lin Wang

      Article first published online: 26 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201414

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      Pyroelectric nanogenerators fabricated using a lead-free KNbO3 nanowire-PDMS polymer composite are reported for the first time. The voltage/current output of the nanogenerators can be controlled by electric fields and enhanced by increasing the rate of change in temperature. The fabricated nanogenerators can be used to harvest energy from sunlight illumination and have potential applications in self-powered nanodevices and nanosystems.

    8. Unusually High-Performing Organic Field-Effect Transistors Based on π-Extended Semiconducting Porphyrins (pages 5363–5367)

      Mai Ha Hoang, Youngmee Kim, Minsik Kim, Kyung Hwan Kim, Tae Wan Lee, Duc Nghia Nguyen, Sung-Jin Kim, Kwangyeol Lee, Suk Joong Lee and Dong Hoon Choi

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202148

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      Highly conjugated porphyrin derivatives, H2TP and ZnTP, are synthesized. J-aggregations of the H-aggregated dimeric porphyrin pairs are clearly observed by their single crystal structures that facilitate slip-stacked charge transport phenomenon. In particular, their SC-FETs show the highest field-effect mobilities of 0.85–2.90 cm2 V−1s−1. Furthermore, the ZnTP-based OPT displays a dramatic photoinduced current enhancement with a high photoresponsivity of 22 000 A W−1 under a very low light intensity (5.6 m W cm−2).

    9. Improvement of Interfacial Contacts for New Small-Molecule Bulk-Heterojunction Organic Photovoltaics (pages 5368–5373)

      Andres Garcia, Gregory C. Welch, Erin L. Ratcliff, David S. Ginley, Guillermo C. Bazan and Dana C. Olson

      Article first published online: 8 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200963

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      The influence of protonation reactions between poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene):poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) and a thiadiazolo[3,4-c]pyridine small-molecule donor are reported; these result in poor solar-cell performance due to a barrier for charge extraction. The use of a NiOx contact eliminates such deleterious chemical interactions and results in substantial improvements in open-circuit voltage, fill factor, and an increased power conversion efficiency from 2.3% to 5.1%.

    10. Full Solution-Processed Synthesis of All Metal Oxide-Based Tree-like Heterostructures on Fluorine-Doped Tin Oxide for Water Splitting (pages 5374–5378)

      Zongyou Yin, Zheng Wang, Yaping Du, Xiaoying Qi, Yizhong Huang, Can Xue and Hua Zhang

      Article first published online: 1 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201474

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      Well-ordered tree-like functional heterostructures, composed of the environmentally friendly oxides ZnO, TiO2, and CuO, on a fluorine-doped tin oxide substrate are realized by a practical, cost-effective, solution-processable strategy. The heterostructures are demonstrated to be an efficient light-harvesting medium in a photo-electrochemical cell to split water for hydrogen-gas generation, and the developed strategy provides a highly promising, cheap, green way to fabricate multifunctional hierarchically branched structures for many potential applications.

    11. A Novel Electromechanical Actuation Mechanism of a Carbon Nanotube Fiber (pages 5379–5384)

      Wenhan Guo, Chao Liu, Fangyuan Zhao, Xuemei Sun, Zhibin Yang, Tao Chen, Xuli Chen, Longbin Qiu, Xinhua Hu and Huisheng Peng

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201845

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      A spun carbon nanotube fiber functions as a torsional actuator in almost all available environmental media such as air, water, organic solvents, and electrolyte solutions. The Ampere's Law among helically aligned carbon nanotubes explains the simultaneous occurrence of lengthwise contraction and rotary torsion upon applying a low current. The produced stress is over 100 times that of the strongest natural skeletal muscle with high reversibility and good stability. The use of torsional fibers for electric motors is demonstrated.

    12. High Junction and Twin Boundary Densities in Driven Dynamical Systems (pages 5385–5389)

      X. Ding, Z. Zhao, T. Lookman, A. Saxena and E. K. H. Salje

      Article first published online: 31 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201200986

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      A novel mechanism for the generation of device materials with very high domain boundary densities is described: we shear the sample in a computer experiment and achieve higher twin densities than in rapid quench. These domain patterns are very stable. Elastically soft materials (image with 6.4equation image105 atoms) has greater twin densities than hard materials, even for nano-crystals.

  10. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correction
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communication
    1. Graphene: Unraveling Stress-Induced Toxicity Properties of Graphene Oxide and the Underlying Mechanism (Adv. Mater. 39/2012) (page 5390)

      Wendi Zhang, Chi Wang, Zhongjun Li, Zhenzhen Lu, Yiye Li, Jun-Jie Yin, Yu-Ting Zhou, Xingfa Gao, Ying Fang, Guangjun Nie and Yuliang Zhao

      Article first published online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290238

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      Graphene oxide shows stress-induced toxicity properties in vivo under different pathophysiological conditions, as Yuliang Zhao, Guangjun Nie, Ying Fang, and co-workers report on page 5391. A dual-path chemical mechanism, involving the over-production of hydroxyl radicals and the formation of oxidizing cytochrome c intermediates, is responsible for the toxicity properties.

  11. Communication

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correction
    8. Review
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communication
    1. Unraveling Stress-Induced Toxicity Properties of Graphene Oxide and the Underlying Mechanism (pages 5391–5397)

      Wendi Zhang, Chi Wang, Zhongjun Li, Zhenzhen Lu, Yiye Li, Jun-Jie Yin, Yu-Ting Zhou, Xingfa Gao, Ying Fang, Guangjun Nie and Yuliang Zhao

      Article first published online: 24 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202678

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graphene oxide shows stress-induced toxicity properties in vivo under different pathophysiological conditions. A dual-path chemical mechanism, involving the overproduction of hydroxyl radicals and the formation of oxidizing cytochrome c intermediates, is responsible for the toxicity properties.

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