Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

November 20, 2012

Volume 24, Issue 44

Pages 5903–5966, OP273–OP352

  1. Cover Picture

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    4. Masthead
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    6. Communications
    7. Frontispiece
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    9. Cover Picture: Advanced Optical Materials
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    14. Editorial: Advanced Optical Materials
    15. Review: Advanced Optical Materials
    16. Communications: Advanced Optical Materials
    17. Full Papers: Advanced Optical Materials
    1. Biomedical Applications: Lithographically Encoded Polymer Microtaggant Using High-Capacity and Error-Correctable QR Code for Anti-Counterfeiting of Drugs (Adv. Mater. 44/2012) (page 5903)

      Sangkwon Han, Hyung Jong Bae, Junhoi Kim, Sunghwan Shin, Sung-Eun Choi, Sung Hoon Lee, Sunghoon Kwon and Wook Park

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290281

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A lithographically encoded microtaggant for the anti-counterfeiting of drugs is presented by Wook Park, Sunghoon Kwon, and co-workers on page 5924. The microtaggant utilizes the high-capacity and error-correctable features of Quick Response (QR) code to store large amounts of drug information. The image illustrates the incorporation of QR-coded microtaggants in a capsule as a demonstration of on-dose authentication (ODA). Try reading the code with your smartphone!

  2. Inside Front Cover

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    16. Communications: Advanced Optical Materials
    17. Full Papers: Advanced Optical Materials
    1. Transistors: Flexible Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Polymer Memory with Gate-Controlled Multilevel Operation (Adv. Mater. 44/2012) (page 5904)

      Sun Kak Hwang, Insung Bae, Richard Hahnkee Kim and Cheolmin Park

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290282

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      A flexible field effect transistor with a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) active channel and a ferroelectric poly(vinlyidene fluoride-co-trifluoro ethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) insulator exhibits gate-voltage-controllable multilevel non-volatile memory characteristics with highly reliable data retention and endurance. The operating mechanism of the device is based on multileveled non-volatile current states of a polymeric semiconductor precisely controlled by various remnant polarization states of ferroelectric polymer domains. Further details can be found in the article by Cheolmin Park and co-workers on page 5910.

  3. Masthead

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    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 44/2012)

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290283

  4. Contents

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  5. Communications

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    1. Flexible Non-Volatile Ferroelectric Polymer Memory with Gate-Controlled Multilevel Operation (pages 5910–5914)

      Sun Kak Hwang, Insung Bae, Richard Hahnkee Kim and Cheolmin Park

      Version of Record online: 9 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201831

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      A flexible field-effect transistor with a poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) active channel and a ferroelectric poly(vinlyidene fluoride-co-trifluoro ethylene) (PVDF-TrFE) insulator exhibits gate-voltage-controllable multilevel non-volatile memory characteristics with highly reliable data retention and endurance.

    2. A Wafer-Level Integrated White-Light-Emitting Diode Incorporating Colloidal Quantum Dots as a Nanocomposite Luminescent Material (pages 5915–5918)

      Cuong Dang, Joonhee Lee, Yu Zhang, Jung Han, Craig Breen, Jonathan S. Steckel, Seth Coe-Sullivan and Arto Nurmikko

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202354

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      High-brightness, color-tunable colloidal quantum dots are incorporated in 3D nanoporous GaN to create a nanocomposite material (CQD/NP-GaN), which is demonstrated to be an effective approach for a wavelength down-conversion nanomaterial in solid-state lighting. The white-light-emitting diode (LED) made from a blue GaN-based LED and the CQD/NP-GaN shows an increase of extraction efficiency by a factor of 2, a controllable white color, and a down-conversion quantum efficiency as high as 82%.

    3. Measurement of Barrier Tissue Integrity with an Organic Electrochemical Transistor (pages 5919–5923)

      Leslie H Jimison, Scherrine A. Tria, Dion Khodagholy, Moshe Gurfinkel, Erica Lanzarini, Adel Hama, George G. Malliaras and Róisín M. Owens

      Version of Record online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202612

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      The integration of an organic electrochemical transistor with human barrier tissue cells provides a novel method for assessing toxicology of compounds in vitro. Minute variations in paracellular ionic flux induced by toxic compounds are measured in real time, with unprecedented temporal resolution and extreme sensitivity.

    4. Lithographically Encoded Polymer Microtaggant Using High-Capacity and Error-Correctable QR Code for Anti-Counterfeiting of Drugs (pages 5924–5929)

      Sangkwon Han, Hyung Jong Bae, Junhoi Kim, Sunghwan Shin, Sung-Eun Choi, Sung Hoon Lee, Sunghoon Kwon and Wook Park

      Version of Record online: 28 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201486

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      A QR-coded microtaggant for the anti-counterfeiting of drugs is proposed that can provide high capacity and error-correction capability. It is fabricated lithographically in a microfluidic channel with special consideration of the island patterns in the QR Code. The microtaggant is incorporated in the drug capsule (“on-dose authentication”) and can be read by a simple smartphone QR Code reader application when removed from the capsule and washed free of drug.

    5. A Spirobifluorene-Based Polymer of Intrinsic Microporosity with Improved Performance for Gas Separation (pages 5930–5933)

      C. Grazia Bezzu, Mariolino Carta, Alexander Tonkins, Johannes C. Jansen, Paola Bernardo, Fabio Bazzarelli and Neil B. McKeown

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202393

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      A highly gas-permeable polymer with enhanced selectivities is prepared using spirobifluorene as the main structural unit. The greater rigidity of this polymer of intrinsic microporosity (PIM-SBF) facilitates gas permeability data that lie above the 2008 Robeson upper bound, which is the universal performance indicator for polymer gas separation membranes.

    6. A New Dielectric Metamaterial Building Block with a Strong Magnetic Response in the Sub-1.5-Micrometer Region: Silicon Colloid Nanocavities (pages 5934–5938)

      Lei Shi, T. Umut Tuzer, Roberto Fenollosa and Francisco Meseguer

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201987

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      A new dielectric metamaterial building block based on high refractive index silicon spherical nanocavities with Mie resonances appearing in the near infrared optical region is prepared and characterized. It is demonstrated both experimentally and theoretically that a single silicon nanocavity supports well-defined and robust magnetic resonances, even in a liquid medium environment, at wavelength values up to six times larger than the cavity radius.

    7. Tailored Star Block Copolymer Architecture for High Performance Chemically Amplified Resists (pages 5939–5944)

      Florian Wieberger, Christian Neuber, Christopher K. Ober and Hans-Werner Schmidt

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201547

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      Star block copolymers are demonstrated for their application as a high-performance resist material. This new resist material shows advanced progress in sensitivity and solubility contrast and is finally combinatorially optimized to achieve a 66 nm line/space pattern. The tailored molecular architecture of the star block copolymer is synthesized via core-first atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) and shows narrow polydispersity indices below 1.2.

  6. Frontispiece

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    15. Review: Advanced Optical Materials
    16. Communications: Advanced Optical Materials
    17. Full Papers: Advanced Optical Materials
    1. Energy Storage: Enhanced Energy Storage and Suppressed Dielectric Loss in Oxide Core–Shell–Polyolefin Nanocomposites by Moderating Internal Surface Area and Increasing Shell Thickness (Adv. Mater. 44/2012) (page 5945)

      Lisa A. Fredin, Zhong Li, Mark A. Ratner, Michael T. Lanagan and Tobin J. Marks

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290280

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      On page 5946, Tobin J. Marks, Mark A. Ratner, Michael T. Lanagan, and co-workers report a series of metal oxide core/Al2O3 shell polypropylene nanocomposites synthesized via in situ polymerization utilizing a metallocene polymerization catalyst chemisorbed on the nanoparticle surfaces. The good particle dispersion and tunable shell thickness afford materials with high energy storage capacities and low dielectric loss at high voltages.

  7. Communications

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    1. Enhanced Energy Storage and Suppressed Dielectric Loss in Oxide Core–Shell–Polyolefin Nanocomposites by Moderating Internal Surface Area and Increasing Shell Thickness (pages 5946–5953)

      Lisa A. Fredin, Zhong Li, Mark A. Ratner, Michael T. Lanagan and Tobin J. Marks

      Version of Record online: 27 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202183

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      Dielectric loss in metal oxide core/Al2O3 shell polypropylene nanocomposites scales with the particle surface area. By moderating the interfacial surface area between the phases and using increasing shell thicknesses, dielectric loss is significantly reduced, and thus the energy stored within, and recoverable from, capacitors fabricated from these materials is significantly increased, to as high as 2.05 J/cm3.

    2. Unconventional Nucleation and Oriented Growth of ZIF-8 Crystals on Non-Polar Surface (pages 5954–5958)

      Shaozhou Li, Wenxiong Shi, Guang Lu, Shuzhou Li, Say Chye Joachim Loo and Fengwei Huo

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201996

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      Zeolitic imidazolate framework-8 (ZIF-8) crystals show unconventionally selective nucleation and oriented growth on a patterned self-assembled monolayer (SAM) surface. The growth selectivity and crystal orientation are also affected by the odd-even effect for SAMs. The oriented growth of the ZIF-8 crystals is found to result from fast crystallization of the nuclei triggered by the specific SAM surfaces.

    3. Enhanced Photocurrents of Photosystem I Films on p-Doped Silicon (pages 5959–5962)

      Gabriel LeBlanc, Gongping Chen, Evan A. Gizzie, G. Kane Jennings and David E. Cliffel

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202794

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      Tuning the Fermi energy of silicon through doping leads to alignment of silicon bands with the redox active sites of photosystem I. Integrating photosystem I films with p-doped silicon results in the highest reported photocurrent enhancement for a biohybrid electrode based on photosystem I.

    4. Wetting Transitions in Underwater Oleophobic Surface of Brass (pages 5963–5966)

      Vahid Hejazi, Aniedi E. Nyong, Pradeep K. Rohatgi and Michael Nosonovsky

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202516

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      An oil droplet in water can be in the Cassie state (with water and/or air trapped between the solid and oil) with a high contact angle (top left) or in the Wenzel state (top right). Depending on the roughness of the brass substrate, both states with high (bottom left) and low (bottom right) contact angle are observed.

  8. Cover Picture: Advanced Optical Materials

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    1. Lithography: Resolution Limit in Plasmonic Lithography for Practical Applications beyond 2x-nm Half Pitch (Adv. Mater. 44/2012) (page OP273)

      Seok Kim, Howon Jung, Yongwoo Kim, Jinhee Jang and Jae W. Hahn

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290284

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      The ultimate resolution of plasmonic lithography using a ridge aperture is evaluated using a theoretical model by Jae W. Hahn and co-workers on page OP337. A circular contact probe with high positioning accuracy is fabricated to record high density line array patterns with a half pitch up to 22 nm. The model fits well with the experimental results for pattern depth and predicts the resolution of plasmonic lithography to be less than 10 nm.

  9. Inside Front Cover: Advanced Optical Materials

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    1. Invisibility Cloaking: Invisibility and Cloaking Based on Scattering Cancellation (Adv. Mater. 44/2012) (page OP274)

      Pai-Yen Chen, Jason Soric and Andrea Alù

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290285

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      The exciting area of invisibility cloaking is reviewed by Andrea Alù and co-workers on page OP281. Various solutions for invisibility cloaking using metamaterials, metasurfaces, graphene and plasmonic materials in different spectral ranges are discussed. Particular focus is placed on scattering-cancellation approaches, highlighting material challenges, venues and opportunities for plasmonicand mantle-cloaking techniques, in various frequency windows, and for several devices and applications.

  10. Back Cover: Advanced Optical Materials

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    1. Carbon Nanotubes: Carbon Nanotube Based High Resolution Holograms (Adv. Mater. 44/2012) (page OP356)

      Haider Butt, Yunuen Montelongo, Tim Butler, Ranjith Rajesekharan, Qing Dai, Sai G. Shiva-Reddy, Timothy D. Wilkinson and Gehan A. J. Amaratunga

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290286

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      By using carbon nanotubes as the smallest possible scattering element, light can be diffracted in a highly controlled manner to produce a 2D image, as reported by Haider Butt and co-workers on page OP331. An array of carbon nanotubes is elegantly patterned to produce a high resolution hologram. In response to incident light on the hologram, a high contrast and wide field of view “CAMBRIDGE” image is produced.

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    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 44/2012)

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290287

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  13. Editorial: Advanced Optical Materials

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      Advanced Optical Materials reaches the next level (pages OP279–OP280)

      Tim Adams and Eva Rittweger

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201204367

  14. Review: Advanced Optical Materials

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      Invisibility and Cloaking Based on Scattering Cancellation (pages OP281–OP304)

      Pai-Yen Chen, Jason Soric and Andrea Alù

      Version of Record online: 19 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202624

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      Various solutions for invisibility cloaking using metamaterials, metasurfaces, graphene and plasmonic materials in different spectral ranges are reviewed. The primary focus of this Review is on scattering-cancellation approaches, highlighting material challenges, venues and opportunities for plasmonic- and mantle-cloaking techniques, in various frequency windows, and for several devices and applications.

  15. Communications: Advanced Optical Materials

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    1. Anisotropic Resonant Scattering from Polymer Photonic Crystals (pages OP305–OP308)

      Andrew I. Haines, Chris E. Finlayson, David R. E. Snoswell, Peter Spahn, G. Peter Hellmann and Jeremy J. Baumberg

      Version of Record online: 23 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202169

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      Hyperspectral goniometry reveals anisotropic scattering which dominates the visual appearance of self-assembled polymer opals. The technique allows reconstruction of the reciprocal-space of nanostructures, and indicates that chain defects formed during shear-ordering are responsible for the anisotropy in these samples. Enhanced scattering with improving order is shown to arise from increased effective refractive index contrast, while broadband background scatter is suppressed by absorptive dopants.

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      Solid Immersion Facilitates Fluorescence Microscopy with Nanometer Resolution and Sub-Ångström Emitter Localization (pages OP309–OP313)

      Dominik Wildanger, Brian R. Patton, Heiko Schill, Luca Marseglia, J. P. Hadden, Sebastian Knauer, Andreas Schönle, John G. Rarity, Jeremy L. O'Brien, Stefan W. Hell and Jason M. Smith

      Version of Record online: 12 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201203033

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      Exploring the maximum spatial resolution achievable in far-field optical imaging, we show that applying solid immersion lenses (SIL) in stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy addresses single spins with a resolution down to 2.4 ± 0.3 nm and with a localization precision of 0.09 nm.

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      Excitation Enhancement of a Quantum Dot Coupled to a Plasmonic Antenna (pages OP314–OP320)

      Esteban Bermúdez Ureña, Mark P. Kreuzer, Stella Itzhakov, Hervé Rigneault, Romain Quidant, Dan Oron and Jérôme Wenger

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202783

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      Plasmonic antennas are key elements to control the luminescence of quantum emitters. However, the antenna's influence is often hidden by quenching losses. Here, the luminescence of a quantum dot coupled to a gold dimer antenna is investigated. Detailed analysis of the multiply excited states quantifies the antenna's influence on the excitation intensity and the luminescence quantum yield separately.

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      Circular Dichroism from Chiral Nanomaterial Fabricated by On-Edge Lithography (pages OP321–OP325)

      Kay Dietrich, Dennis Lehr, Christian Helgert, Andreas Tünnermann and Ernst-Bernhard Kley

      Version of Record online: 8 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201203424

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      A novel-shaped plasmonic chiral nanomaterial exhibiting circular dichroism in the near-infrared spectral range is presented. Applying on-edge lithography, a large area with these nanostructures is efficiently covered. This fabrication method offers tunability of the operation bandwidth by tailoring the chiral shape.

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      High-Optical-Quality Blends of Anionic Polymethine Salts and Polycarbonate with Enhanced Third-Order Non-linearities for Silicon-Organic Hybrid Devices (pages OP326–OP330)

      Zhong'an Li, Yang Liu, Hyeongeu Kim, Joel M. Hales, Sei-Hum Jang, Jingdong Luo, Tom Baehr-Jones, Michael Hochberg, Seth R. Marder, Joseph W. Perry and Alex K.-Y. Jen

      Version of Record online: 23 JUL 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202325

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      A series of anionic polymethine dyes with different aromatic counterions are prepared to improve their compatibility as guests in an amorphous polycarbonate host. When they are used as the cladding material for silicon hybrid slot waveguides, four-wave mixing wavelength conversion and two-photon absorption-based optical-power modulation are observed. Such guest-host materials may be attractive candidates for all-optical signal-processing applications.

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      Carbon Nanotube Based High Resolution Holograms (pages OP331–OP336)

      Haider Butt, Yunuen Montelongo, Tim Butler, Ranjith Rajesekharan, Qing Dai, Sai G. Shiva-Reddy, Timothy D. Wilkinson and Gehan A. J. Amaratunga

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202593

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      Carbon nanotubes are used as the smallest possible scattering element for diffracting light in a highly controlled manner to produce a 2D image. An array of carbon nanotubes is elegantly patterned to produce a high resolution hologram. In response to incident light on the hologram, a high contrast and wide field of view CAMBRIDGE image is produced.

  16. Full Papers: Advanced Optical Materials

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      Resolution Limit in Plasmonic Lithography for Practical Applications beyond 2x-nm Half Pitch (pages OP337–OP344)

      Seok Kim, Howon Jung, Yongwoo Kim, Jinhee Jang and Jae W. Hahn

      Version of Record online: 8 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201203604

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The ultimate resolution of plasmonic lithography using a ridge aperture is evaluated with a theoretical model. A circular contact probe with high positioning accuracy is fabricated to record high-density line array patterns with a half pitch of up to 22 nm. The model fits well with the pattern depth experimental results and predicts a resolution for plasmonic lithography to less than 10 nm.

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      Photoalignment and Surface-Relief-Grating Formation are Efficiently Combined in Low-Molecular-Weight Halogen-Bonded Complexes (pages OP345–OP352)

      Arri Priimagi, Marco Saccone, Gabriella Cavallo, Atsushi Shishido, Tullio Pilati, Pierangelo Metrangolo and Giuseppe Resnati

      Version of Record online: 18 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201204060

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      An unprecedented optical performance is reported for a novel photoresponsive supramolecular liquid-crystalline complex, self-assembled through halogen bonding between a non-mesogenic stilbazole derivative, acting as a bond acceptor, and a non-mesogenic bond donor containing an azo-group. Efficient photoalignment and an exceptional surface-relief-grating formation are combined in this low-molecular-weight supramolecular assembly, thanks to the high directionality of the halogen bond.

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