Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 24 Issue 45

November 27, 2012

Volume 24, Issue 45

Pages 5971–6110

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Chemical Sensing: All-in-Fiber Chemical Sensing (Adv. Mater. 45/2012) (page 5971)

      Alexander Gumennik, Alexander M. Stolyarov, Brent R. Schell, Chong Hou, Guillaume Lestoquoy, Fabien Sorin, William McDaniel, Aimee Rose, John D. Joannopoulos and Yoel Fink

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290275

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Photoconductive structures (PCS), embedded directly into the fiber cladding and extending its entire length, capture light emitted by a chemiluminescent material reacting with peroxide vapor flowing through the fiber core, as reported by Yoel Fink and co-workers on page 6005. The PCS directly transform this emissive signal into an electrical signal, thus facilitating a new all-in-fiber platform for remote and distributed photosensing. Image: courtesy of Yan Liang.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Piezoelectric Materials: All-Solution-Processed Flexible Thin Film Piezoelectric Nanogenerator (Adv. Mater. 45/2012) (page 5972)

      Sung Yun Chung, Sunyoung Kim, Ju-Hyuck Lee, Kyongjun Kim, Sang-Woo Kim, Chong-Yun Kang, Seok-Jin Yoon and Youn Sang Kim

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290276

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An all-solution-processed flexible piezoelectric nanogenerator, composed of polycrystalline ZnO thin film and functional polymer layers such as P3HT/PCBM and PEDOT:PSS, generates energy through a mechanical rolling and muscle stretching system. On page 6022, Youn Sang Kim, Sang-Woo Kim, and co-workers show that this all-solution-processed nanogenerator is feasible as a piezoelectric patchable device and is promising for use in future energy harvesters such as wearable human patches and mobile electronics.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Porous Carbon Nanostructures: Porous Carbon Spheres from Energetic Carbon Precursors using Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis (Adv. Mater. 45/2012) (page 6114)

      Hangxun Xu, Jinrui Guo and Kenneth S. Suslick

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290277

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Porous carbon spheres with unique structures and morphologies are prepared from energetic carbon precursors, alkali propiolates, via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. Aerosolized liquid droplets containing alkali propiolates act as microreactors that confine the thermal decomposition of energetic precursors and lead to the formation of several unprecedented carbon morphologies. More details can be found in the article by Kenneth S. Suslick and co-workers on page 6028.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 45/2012)

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290278

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Graphene-Based Electrodes (pages 5979–6004)

      Xiao Huang, Zhiyuan Zeng, Zhanxi Fan, Juqing Liu and Hua Zhang

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201587

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graphene and its derivatives are among the most attractive materials to prepare various kinds of electrodes. This review provides a discussion of various fabrication methods for graphene-based electrodes, and a detailed description of their applications in electronics, light harvesting, sensors and energy storage devices.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. All-in-Fiber Chemical Sensing (pages 6005–6009)

      Alexander Gumennik, Alexander M. Stolyarov, Brent R. Schell, Chong Hou, Guillaume Lestoquoy, Fabien Sorin, William McDaniel, Aimee Rose, John D. Joannopoulos and Yoel Fink

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201203053

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A new all-in-fiber trace-level chemical sensing approach is demonstrated. Photoconductive structures, embedded directly into the fiber cladding along its entire length, capture light emitted anywhere within the fiber's hollow core and transform it directly into an electrical signal. Localized signal transduction circumvents problems associated with conventional fiber-optics, including limited signal collection efficiency and optical losses. This approach facilitates a new platform for remote and distributed photosensing.

    2. Aptamer-Crosslinked Microbubbles: Smart Contrast Agents for Thrombin-Activated Ultrasound Imaging (pages 6010–6016)

      Matthew A. Nakatsuka, Robert F. Mattrey, Sadik C. Esener, Jennifer N. Cha and Andrew P. Goodwin

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201484

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thrombosis, or malignant blood clotting, is associated with numerous cardiovascular diseases and cancers. A microbubble contrast agent is presented that produces ultrasound harmonic signal only when exposed to elevated thrombin levels. Initially silent microbubbles are activated in the presence of both thrombin-spiked and freshly clotting blood in three minutes with detection limits of 20 nM thrombin and 2 aM microbubbles.

    3. A “Ship-In-A-Bottle” Approach to Synthesis of Polymer Dots@Silica or Polymer Dots@Carbon Core-Shell Nanospheres (pages 6017–6021)

      Zhen-An Qiao, Qisheng Huo, Miaofang Chi, Gabriel M. Veith, Andrew J. Binder and Sheng Dai

      Version of Record online: 14 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202620

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A “ship-in-a-bottle” approach to the entrapment and assembly of nanometer-sized polymer dots in hollow silica or carbon nanospheres with size-selective micropores is presented. This new type of core–shell nanospheres exhibits excellent photoluminescence properties and significant adsorption capabilities for transition-metal ions.

    4. All-Solution-Processed Flexible Thin Film Piezoelectric Nanogenerator (pages 6022–6027)

      Sung Yun Chung, Sunyoung Kim, Ju-Hyuck Lee, Kyongjun Kim, Sang-Woo Kim, Chong-Yun Kang, Seok-Jin Yoon and Youn Sang Kim

      Version of Record online: 25 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202708

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An all-solution-processed flexible thin film piezoelectric nanogenerator is demonstrated using reactive zinc hydroxo-condensation and a screen-printing method. The highly elastic thin film allows the piezoelectric energy to be generated through the mechanical rolling and muscle stretching of the piezoelectric unit. This flexible all solution-processed nanogenerator is promising for use in future energy harvesters such as wearable human patches and mobile electronics.

    5. Porous Carbon Spheres from Energetic Carbon Precursors using Ultrasonic Spray Pyrolysis (pages 6028–6033)

      Hangxun Xu, Jinrui Guo and Kenneth S. Suslick

      Version of Record online: 24 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201915

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Porous carbon spheres with unique structures and morphologies are prepared from energetic carbon precursors, alkali propiolates, via ultrasonic spray pyrolysis. Aerosolized liquid droplets containing alkali propiolates act as microreactors that confine the thermal decomposition of energetic precursors and lead to the formation of several unprecedented carbon morphologies.

    6. Studying the Kinetics of Crystalline Silicon Nanoparticle Lithiation with In Situ Transmission Electron Microscopy (pages 6034–6041)

      Matthew T. McDowell, Ill Ryu, Seok Woo Lee, Chongmin Wang, William D. Nix and Yi Cui

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202744

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used to study the electrochemical lithiation of high-capacity crystalline Si nanoparticles for use in Li-ion battery anodes. The lithiation reaction slows down as it progresses into the particle interior, and analysis suggests that this behavior is due not to diffusion limitation but instead to the influence of mechanical stress on the driving force for reaction.

    7. One-Pot Synthesis of Spheres-on-Sphere Silica Particles from a Single Precursor for Fast HPLC with Low Back Pressure (pages 6042–6048)

      Adham Ahmed, Harald Ritchie, Peter Myers and Haifei Zhang

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202810

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spheres-on-sphere (SOS) silica particles are prepared in a one-pot scalable synthesis from mercaptopropyltrimethoxysilane with hydrophilic polymer and cationic surfactant under alkaline conditions. The SOS particles exhibit solid-core porous-shell properties. The fast separation of small molecules and proteins with low back pressure are demonstrated by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) for the columns packed with SOS-particles.

    8. Porous Organic Cage Compounds as Highly Potent Affinity Materials for Sensing by Quartz Crystal Microbalances (pages 6049–6052)

      Malte Brutschy, Markus W. Schneider, Michael Mastalerz and Siegfried R. Waldvogel

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202786

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Porosity makes powerful affinity materials for quartz crystal microbalances. The shape-persistent organic cages and pores create superior affinity systems to existing ones for direct tracing of aromatic solvent vapors. A shape and size selectivity for the analytes is observed. These organic cages can be processed to thin films with highly reproducible sensing properties.

    9. Orderly Ultrathin Films Based on Perylene/Poly(N-vinyl carbazole) Assembled with Layered Double Hydroxide Nanosheets: 2D Fluorescence Resonance Energy Transfer and Reversible Fluorescence Response for Volatile Organic Compounds (pages 6053–6057)

      Zhen Li, Jun Lu, Shuangde Li, Shenghui Qin and Yumei Qin

      Version of Record online: 31 AUG 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201203040

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Neutral poly(N-vinyl carbazole) (PVK) and perylene are coassembled within the interlayers of layered double hydroxide (LDH) nanosheets to form (perylene@PVK/LDH)n ultrathin films by the hydrogen-bond layer-by-layer assembly method. An efficient 2D fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) process from PVK to perylene is demonstrated, and this FRET process can be inhibited/recovered reversibly by the adsorption/desorption of common volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Complex Stiffness Gradient Substrates for Studying Mechanotactic Cell Migration (Adv. Mater. 45/2012) (page 6058)

      Cheng-Hwa R. Kuo, Jian Xian, James D. Brenton, Kristian Franze and Easan Sivaniah

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290273

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Complex stiffness gradient substrates for the study of mechanotactic cell migration are developed by Easan Sivaniah, Kristian Franze, and co-workers on page 6059. Polyacrylamide gels are cast upon a stiff support with controlled topography, resulting in a thin gel layer of variable height. The topographical profiles project a stiffness map onto the gel, resulting in controlled linear and non-linear 2D stiffness gradients. Fibroblasts, which migrate towards stiffer substrates, accumulate in areas with a gel thickness below 15 μm.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Complex Stiffness Gradient Substrates for Studying Mechanotactic Cell Migration (pages 6059–6064)

      Cheng-Hwa R. Kuo, Jian Xian, James D. Brenton, Kristian Franze and Easan Sivaniah

      Version of Record online: 18 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202520

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Polyacrylamide gels are cast upon a stiff support with controlled topography, resulting in a thin gel layer of variable height. The topographical profiles project a stiffness map onto the gel, resulting in controlled linear and non-linear 2D stiffness gradients. Fibroblasts, which migrate towards stiffer substrates, accumulate in areas with a gel thickness below 15 μm.

    2. Dispersible Surface-Enhanced Raman Scattering Nanosheets (pages 6065–6070)

      Kyle D. Osberg, Matthew Rycenga, Gilles R. Bourret, Keith A. Brown and Chad A. Mirkin

      Version of Record online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202845

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ultrathin and flexible silica nanosheets, synthesized with gold nanorod dimers embedded uniformly throughout, can be dispersed in solution and deposited onto arbitrary surfaces. These novel materials conform and maintain the as-synthesized density of dimers, allowing them to be used reliably in labeling and detection applications.

    3. Use of X-Ray Diffraction, Molecular Simulations, and Spectroscopy to Determine the Molecular Packing in a Polymer-Fullerene Bimolecular Crystal (pages 6071–6079)

      Nichole Cates Miller, Eunkyung Cho, Matthias J. N. Junk, Roman Gysel, Chad Risko, Dongwook Kim, Sean Sweetnam, Chad E. Miller, Lee J. Richter, R. Joseph Kline, Martin Heeney, Iain McCulloch, Aram Amassian, Daniel Acevedo-Feliz, Christopher Knox, Michael Ryan Hansen, Dmytro Dudenko, Bradley F. Chmelka, Michael F. Toney, Jean-Luc Brédas and Michael D. McGehee

      Version of Record online: 5 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202293

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The molecular packing in a polymer: fullerene bimolecular crystal is determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), molecular mechanics (MM) and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations, 2D solid-state NMR spectroscopy, and IR absorption spectroscopy. The conformation of the electron-donating polymer is significantly disrupted by the incorporation of the electron-accepting fullerene molecules, which introduce twists and bends along the polymer backbone and 1D electron-conducting fullerene channels.

  10. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Label-Free Polypeptide-Based Enzyme Detection Using a Graphene-Nanoparticle Hybrid Sensor (Adv. Mater. 45/2012) (page 6080)

      Sung Myung, Perry T. Yin, Cheoljin Kim, Jaesung Park, Aniruddh Solanki, Pavel Ivanoff Reyes, Yicheng Lu, Kwang S. Kim and Ki-Bum Lee

      Version of Record online: 20 NOV 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201290274

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A novel approach for the detection of enzymes using a graphene–nanoparticle (NP) hybrid biosensor is developed by Ki-Bum Lee and co-workers on page 6081. This biosensor can detect the activity of an enzyme and determine its concentration by measuring the change in electrical hysteresis that results from the dynamic interaction of the target enzyme with its corresponding peptide linker resulting in the release of nanoparticles.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Label-Free Polypeptide-Based Enzyme Detection Using a Graphene-Nanoparticle Hybrid Sensor (pages 6081–6087)

      Sung Myung, Perry T. Yin, Cheoljin Kim, Jaesung Park, Aniruddh Solanki, Pavel Ivanoff Reyes, Yicheng Lu, Kwang S. Kim and Ki-Bum Lee

      Version of Record online: 7 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202961

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A graphene-nanoparticle (NP) hybrid biosensor that utilizes an electrical hysteresis change to detect the enzymatic activity and concentration of Carboxypeptidase B was developed. The results indicate that the novel graphene-NP hybrid biosensor, utilizing electrical hysteresis, has the ability to detect concentrations of targeted enzyme on the micromolar scale. Furthermore, to the knowledge of the authors, this is the first demonstration of a graphene-based biosensor that utilizes a hysteresis change resulting from metallic NPs assembled on a graphene surface.

    2. Direct Transfer of Subwavelength Plasmonic Nanostructures on Bioactive Silk Films (pages 6088–6093)

      Dianmin Lin, Hu Tao, Jacob Trevino, Jessica P. Mondia, David L. Kaplan, Fiorenzo G. Omenetto and Luca Dal Negro

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201888

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      By a reusable transfer fabrication technique, we demonstrate high-fidelity fabrication of metal nanoparticles, optical nanoantennas, and nanohole arrays directly on a functional silk biopolymer. The ability to reproducibly pattern silk biopolymers with arbitrarily complex plasmonic arrays is of importance for a variety of applications in optical biosensing, tissue engineering, cell biology, and the development of novel bio-optoelectronic medical devices.

    3. Flexible and Transparent Nanogenerators Based on a Composite of Lead-Free ZnSnO3 Triangular-Belts (pages 6094–6099)

      Jyh Ming Wu, Chen Xu, Yan Zhang, Ya Yang, Yusheng Zhou and Zhong Lin Wang

      Version of Record online: 3 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202445

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A flexible and transparent lead-free triangular-belt ZnSnO3 nanogenerator is demonstrated. When a mechanical deformation of ≈0.1% is applied to the triangular-belt ZnSnO3 nanogenerator, the output voltage and current reached 5.3 V and 0.13 μA, respectively, which indicated a maximum output power density of ≈11 μW·cm−3. This is the highest output power that has been demonstrated by lead-free ZnSnO3 triangular-belts.

    4. Photonic Multilayer Sensors from Photo-Crosslinkable Polymer Films (pages 6100–6104)

      Maria C. Chiappelli and Ryan C. Hayward

      Version of Record online: 10 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201202459

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Colorimetric temperature sensors are prepared from photo-crosslinkable polymers by sequentially spin-coating and crosslinking alternating layers of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) and poly(para-methyl styrene). Layer thicknesses and copolymer chemistries are chosen to provide robust colorimetric temperature sensors that cover nearly the full visible spectrum.

    5. Alignment of Liquid Crystals Using a Molecular Layer with Patterned Molecular Density (pages 6105–6110)

      Jong-Ho Son, Wang-Cheol Zin, Hideo Takezoe and Jang-Kun Song

      Version of Record online: 4 SEP 2012 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201201697

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The surface of self-constructed molecular density modulation (SDM) exhibits a wide range of liquid crystal alignment capabilities including planar, tilted, and homeotropic alignments, disclination-free uniform and heterogeneous alignments, and even spatially varying alignments through the single non-contact process. Alignment defects are eliminated by temporary lowering the frictional energy barrier via the open-boundary elastic stabilization (OES) treatment.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION