Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 25 Issue 19

May 21, 2013

Volume 25, Issue 19

Pages 2633–2752

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Self-Assembly: A Robust Route to Enzymatically Functional, Hierarchically Self-Assembled Peptide Frameworks (Adv. Mater. 19/2013) (page 2633)

      S. Sangiambut, K. Channon, N. M. Thomson, S. Sato, T. Tsuge, Y. Doi and E. Sivaniah

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370121

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Adding enzyme biofunctionality to peptide nanofibers is challenging since this can inhibit enzyme activity and peptide self-assembly. Easan Sivaniah and co-workers demonstrate on page 2661 the attachment of a polymerization synthase to peptide nanofibers via a selective non-covalent peptide tag. The biofunctionalization, rapidly achieved, generates a biocompatible biopolyester coat on the fibers, with applicability in biomedical engineering. Cover image by Effigos AG.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Organic Electronics: Bifunctional Star-Burst Amorphous Molecular Materials for OLEDs: Achieving Highly Efficient Solid-State Luminescence and Carrier Transport Induced by Spontaneous Molecular Orientation (Adv. Mater. 19/2013) (page 2634)

      Jun Yun Kim, Takuma Yasuda, Yu Seok Yang and Chihaya Adachi

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370122

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      A design strategy for achieving both efficient solid-state luminescence and high carrier transport properties in organic amorphous molecular materials is demonstrated by Chihaya Adachi, Takuma Yasuda, and co-workers on page 2666. The designed star-burst molecules form amorphous solid films, in which they can align horizontally onto the substrate. This preferential horizontal molecular orientation leads to enhanced charge carrier transport and improved light emission. A high external electroluminescence quantum efficiency of up to 5.9% is achieved by incorporating these bifunctional materials in OLEDs.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Flock-Based Microfluidics: Flock-Based Microfluidics (Adv. Mater. 19/2013) (page 2756)

      Martina Hitzbleck, Robert D. Lovchik and Emmanuel Delamarche

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370123

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      Electrostatic flocking is a technique for depositing vertically-aligned microfibers onto an adhesive-coated substrate using a high electrostatic field. Emmanuel Delamarche and co-workers use this technique on page 2672 to pattern layers of flock fibers resulting in 2D and 3D microfluidic networks, which fill spontaneously due to capillary action. With this approach, multifunctional microfluidic platforms for diagnostic applications can be produced at extremely low cost.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 19/2013)

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370124

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 19/2013) (pages 2635–2640)

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370125

  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Nano-Sized CT Contrast Agents (pages 2641–2660)

      Nohyun Lee, Seung Hong Choi and Taeghwan Hyeon

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300081

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      Various nano-sized materials are developed as novel CT contrast agents to overcome the limitations of current iodinated agents. These novel agents using heavy atoms such as gold, tantalum, lanthanides, and bismuth provide more efficient X-ray contrast effects, and their long-circulation time and facile surface modification allow a variety of applications including targeted imaging, angiography, multimodal imaging, and simultaneous diagnosis and therapy.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. A Robust Route to Enzymatically Functional, Hierarchically Self-Assembled Peptide Frameworks (pages 2661–2665)

      S. Sangiambut, K. Channon, N. M. Thomson, S. Sato, T. Tsuge, Y. Doi and E. Sivaniah

      Article first published online: 22 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201204127

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The addition of enzyme biofunctionality to self-assembling peptide nanofibers is challenging since such additions can inhibit functionality or self-assembly. We introduce a method for peptide nanofiber enzyme functionalization, demonstrated by the attachment of a polymerization synthase to peptide nanofibers. The enzyme generates a biocompatible, biodegradable biopolyester coat on the fibers with applicablity in medical engineering. This approach provides a template for generation of functional bionanomaterials.

    2. Bifunctional Star-Burst Amorphous Molecular Materials for OLEDs: Achieving Highly Efficient Solid-State Luminescence and Carrier Transport Induced by Spontaneous Molecular Orientation (pages 2666–2671)

      Jun Yun Kim, Takuma Yasuda, Yu Seok Yang and Chihaya Adachi

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201204902

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Bifunctional star-burst amorphous molecular materials displaying both efficient solid-state luminescence and high hole-transport properties are developed in this study. A high external electroluminescence quantum efficiency up to 5.9% is attained in OLEDs employing the developed amorphous materials. It is revealed that the spontaneous horizontal orientation of these light-emitting molecules in their molecular-condensed states leads to a remarkable enhancement of the electroluminescence efficiencies and carrier-transport properties.

    3. Flock-Based Microfluidics (pages 2672–2676)

      Martina Hitzbleck, Robert D. Lovchik and Emmanuel Delamarche

      Article first published online: 18 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201204854

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Flock-based microfluidics are created by depositing hydrophilic microfibers on an adhesive-coated substrate using an electric field. This enables the fabrication of self-powered microfluidics from one or more different kinds of fibers that form 2D and 3D flowpaths, which can wick 40 microliters of liquid per square centimeter. With this approach, large areas of functional wicking materials can be produced at extremely low cost.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Self-Assembled Plasmonic Nanoring Cavity Arrays for SERS and LSPR Biosensing (Adv. Mater. 19/2013) (page 2677)

      Hyungsoon Im, Kyle C. Bantz, Si Hoon Lee, Timothy W. Johnson, Christy L. Haynes and Sang-Hyun Oh

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370126

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-assembled plasmonic nanoring cavity arrays are formed alongside the curvature of highly packed metallic nanosphere gratings. The sub-10-nm gap size is precisely tuned via atomic layer deposition and highly ordered arrays are produced over a centimeter-sized area. The resulting hybrid nanostructure boosts coupling efficiency of light into plasmons, and shows improved SERS detection limit. Further details can be found on page 2678 in the article by Sang-Hyun Oh, Christy L. Haynes, and co-workers.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Self-Assembled Plasmonic Nanoring Cavity Arrays for SERS and LSPR Biosensing (pages 2678–2685)

      Hyungsoon Im, Kyle C. Bantz, Si Hoon Lee, Timothy W. Johnson, Christy L. Haynes and Sang-Hyun Oh

      Article first published online: 22 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201204283

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Self-assembled plasmonic nanoring cavity arrays are formed alongside the curvature of highly packed metallic nanosphere gratings. The sub-10-nm gap size is precisely tuned via atomic layer deposition and highly ordered arrays are produced over a cm-sized area. The resulting hybrid nanostructure boosts coupling efficiency of light into plasmons, and shows an improved SERS detection limit. These substrates are used for SERS detection of the biological analyte, adenine, followed by concurrent localized surface plasmon resonance sensing.

    2. Facile Synthesis of Magnetite/Perfluorocarbon Co-Loaded Organic/Inorganic Hybrid Vesicles for Dual-Modality Ultrasound/Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Imaging-Guided High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation (pages 2686–2692)

      Dechao Niu, Xia Wang, Yongsheng Li, Yuanyi Zheng, Faqi Li, Hangrong Chen, Jinlou Gu, Wenru Zhao and Jianlin Shi

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201204316

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      Multifunctional organic/inorganic hybrid nanovesicles, fabricated by a facile self-assembly/sol-gel approach, display a unique morphology (figure) and satisfactory stability under physiological conditions. By co-encapsulation of superparamagnetic magnetite nanoparticles and a liquid perfluorocarbon, the nanovesicles can be used not only as a dual-modality ultrasound/magnetic resonance contrast agent for accurate cancer diagnosis and monitoring, but also as a therapeutic enhancement agent for effective high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) ablation.

    3. Melting of Metallic Electrodes and Their Flowing Through a Carbon Nanotube Channel within a Device (pages 2693–2699)

      Rujia Zou, Zhenyu Zhang, Qian Liu, Kaibing Xu, Aijiang Lu, Junqing Hu, Quan Li, Yoshio Bando and Dmitri Golberg

      Article first published online: 5 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300257

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      Evidence is presented of a new cause of Joule heating within a simple electronic device involving a multiwalled carbon nanotube (CNT) mounted on two metal electrodes forming an electrical circuit. This time-resolved, high-resolution in situ observation of metal electrode material melting and its flow driven by the thermomigration and electromigration forces through the CNT channel sheds an additional light on the effects affecting the real electrical performance of the CNT-based devices.

  10. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Fluorescent Protein Senses and Reports Mechanical Damage in Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites (Adv. Mater. 19/2013) (page 2700)

      Katarzyna Makyła, Christoph Müller, Samuel Lörcher, Thomas Winkler, Martin G. Nussbaumer, Michaela Eder and Nico Bruns

      Article first published online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370127

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      A fluorescent protein is implemented by Nico Bruns and co-workers on page 2701 as a force-responsive molecular sensor at the fiber-resin interface in glass-fiber reinforced composites. Micrometer-scale damage, such as fiber fractures and fiber matrix debonding, is reported by loss of yellow fluorescence in the damaged areas due to a force-induced unfolding of the protein.

  11. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Review
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Communications
    1. Fluorescent Protein Senses and Reports Mechanical Damage in Glass-Fiber-Reinforced Polymer Composites (pages 2701–2706)

      Katarzyna Makyła, Christoph Müller, Samuel Lörcher, Thomas Winkler, Martin G. Nussbaumer, Michaela Eder and Nico Bruns

      Article first published online: 19 FEB 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201205226

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) is used as a mechanoresponsive layer at the fiber/resin interface in glass-fiber-reinforced composites. The protein loses its fluorescence when subjected to mechanical stress. Within the material, it reports interfacial shear debonding and barely visible impact damage by a transition from a fluorescent to a non-fluorescent state.

    2. Highly Stretchable Patterned Gold Electrodes Made of Au Nanosheets (pages 2707–2712)

      Geon Dae Moon, Guh-Hwan Lim, Jun Hyuk Song, Minkwan Shin, Taekyung Yu, Byungkwon Lim and Unyong Jeong

      Article first published online: 9 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300794

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      Multilayered Au nanosheets are suggested as a novel class of material for fabricating stretchable electrodes suitable for organic-based electronic devices. The electrodes show no difference in resistivity during repeated stretching cycles of up to ϵ = 40%.

    3. Tunable 3D Extended Self-Assembled Gold Metamaterials with Enhanced Light Transmission (pages 2713–2716)

      Stefano Salvatore, Angela Demetriadou, Silvia Vignolini, Sang Soon Oh, Sebastian Wuestner, Nataliya A. Yufa, Morgan Stefik, Ulrich Wiesner, Jeremy J. Baumberg, Ortwin Hess and Ullrich Steiner

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300193

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      The optical properties of metamaterials made by block copolymer self-assembly are tuned by structural and environmental variations. The plasma frequency red-shifts with increasing lattice constant and blue-shifts as the network filling fraction increases. Infiltration with dielectric liquids leads also to a red-shift of the plasma edge. A 300 nm-thick slab of gyroid-structured gold has a remarkable transmission of 20%.

    4. MOF-Polymer Composite Microcapsules Derived from Pickering Emulsions (pages 2717–2722)

      Jia Huo, Marco Marcello, Ashesh Garai and Darren Bradshaw

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201204913

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      Hollow composite microcapsules are prepared by the assembly of pre-formed nanocrystals of metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) around emulsion droplets, followed by interfacial polymerisation of the interior. The micropores of the MOF crystals embedded within a semipermeable hierarchically structured polymeric membrane are an effective combination for the retention of encapsulated dye molecules. Release can be triggered however by acid dissolution of the MOF component.

    5. Synthesis of Protein-Based, Rod-Shaped Particles from Spherical Templates using Layer-by-Layer Assembly (pages 2723–2727)

      Zhimin Zhou, Aaron C. Anselmo and Samir Mitragotri

      Article first published online: 12 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300220

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      Nanorods provide distinct advantages over their spherical counterparts for targeted drug delivery. Here, a novel method is described for the synthesis of biocompatible protein nanorods from spherical polystyrene templates using the layer-by-layer (LBL) technique. These nanorods can be used as a vehicle for the delivery of therapeutic agents to diseased sites.

    6. “Raisin Bun”-Like Nanocomposites of Palladium Clusters and Porphyrin for Superior Formic Acid Oxidation (pages 2728–2732)

      Xiuxin Wang, Jiandong Yang, Huajie Yin, Rui Song and Zhiyong Tang

      Article first published online: 10 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201205168

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      A novel “raisin bun”-like nanocomposite, where Pd clusters are embedded in porphyrin matrix, is developed as a promising electrocatalyst. Thanks to the synergy between the Pd clusters and the porphyrin matrix, this composite exhibits a low oxidation potential, high mass activity and excellent stability toward electrochemical oxidation of formic acid, which opens new routes for the design of high-performance catalysts in fuel cells.

    7. Transferable and Flexible Label-Like Macromolecular Memory on Arbitrary Substrates with High Performance and a Facile Methodology (pages 2733–2739)

      Ying-Chih Lai, Fang-Chi Hsu, Jian-Yu Chen, Jr-Hau He, Ting-Chang Chang, Ya-Ping Hsieh, Tai-Yuan Lin, Ying-Jay Yang and Yang-Fang Chen

      Article first published online: 4 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201205280

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      A newly designed transferable and flexible label-like organic memory based on a graphene electrode behaves like a sticker, and can be readily placed on desired substrates or devices for diversified purposes. The memory label reveals excellent performance despite its physical presentation. This may greatly extend the memory applications in various advanced electronics and provide a simple scheme to integrate with other electronics.

    8. Direct Exfoliation of Graphite to Graphene in Aqueous Media with Diazaperopyrenium Dications (pages 2740–2745)

      Srinivasan Sampath, Ashish N. Basuray, Karel J. Hartlieb, Taner Aytun, Samuel I. Stupp and J. Fraser Stoddart

      Article first published online: 3 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201205157

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      The 2,9-dimethyldiazaperopyrenium dication can be made from a ubiquitous and inexpensive feedstock in three simple steps as its chloride salt. When mixed with powdered graphite at 23 °C, this behemoth of a molecular compound exfoliates graphite to graphene in water under mild conditions.

    9. A Platform for Large-Scale Graphene Electronics – CVD Growth of Single-Layer Graphene on CVD-Grown Hexagonal Boron Nitride (pages 2746–2752)

      Min Wang, Sung Kyu Jang, Won-Jun Jang, Minwoo Kim, Seong-Yong Park, Sang-Woo Kim, Se-Jong Kahng, Jae-Young Choi, Rodney S. Ruoff, Young Jae Song and Sungjoo Lee

      Article first published online: 10 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201204904

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Direct chemical vapor deposition (CVD) growth of single-layer graphene on CVD-grown hexagonal boron nitride (h-BN) film can suggest a large-scale and high-quality graphene/h-BN film hybrid structure with a defect-free interface. This sequentially grown graphene/h-BN film shows better electronic properties than that of graphene/SiO2 or graphene transferred on h-BN film, and suggests a new promising template for graphene device fabrication.

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