Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 25 Issue 26

July 12, 2013

Volume 25, Issue 26

Pages 3501–3611

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Organic Light-Emitting Diodes: Highly Enhanced Light Extraction from Surface Plasmonic Loss Minimized Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (Adv. Mater. 26/2013) (page 3501)

      Jung-Bum Kim, Jeong-Hwan Lee, Chang-Ki Moon, Sei-Yong Kim and Jang-Joo Kim

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370167

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      The front cover image shows the effect of extracting the light trapped inside of organic lightemitting diodes (OLED) by using structures on both sides. On page 3571, Jang-Joo Kim and co-workers report extremely high light out-coupling efficiency from a transparent organic light-emitting diode integrated with microstructures on both sides of the device. It is also shown that the metal free device offers dramatically reduced surface plasmonic losses.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Cancer Therapy: Diamond-Lipid Hybrids Enhance Chemotherapeutic Tolerance and Mediate Tumor Regression (Adv. Mater. 26/2013) (page 3502)

      Laura Moore, Edward Kai-Hua Chow, Eiji Osawa, J. Michael Bishop and Dean Ho

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370168

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      To facilitate targeted drug delivery using nanodiamond (ND) vehicles, epirubicin-functionalized ND/lipid hybrids are coupled to epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) antibodies. The resulting particles mediate tumor regression, and markedly improve drug tolerance in a triplenegative breast cancer model in vivo. Furthermore, comprehensive biocompatibility analysis following intravenous ND administration indicate that the particles are well tolerated by mice. Further information can be found in the article by Dean Ho and co-workers on page 3532.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
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      Biomedical Applications: Surface Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles with Red Blood Cell Membranes (Adv. Mater. 26/2013) (page 3616)

      Weiwei Gao, Che-Ming J. Hu, Ronnie H. Fang, Brian T. Luk, Jing Su and Liangfang Zhang

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370169

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      Liangfang Zhang and co-workers report on page 3549 a top-down approach to functionalize gold nanoparticles with cellular membranes from natural red blood cells. The resulting gold nanoparticles have an enclosed membrane shield and biological characteristics found on the source cells. By combining inorganic gold nanoparticles with biological membranes, this work demonstrates a compelling strategy to develop biomimetic gold nanostructures for future applications.

  4. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 26/2013)

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370170

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 26/2013) (pages 3503–3507)

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370171

  6. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Using Functional Nanomaterials to Target and Regulate the Tumor Microenvironment: Diagnostic and Therapeutic Applications (pages 3508–3525)

      Tianjiao Ji, Ying Zhao, Yanping Ding and Guangjun Nie

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300299

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      The tumor microenvironment is an ensemble performance of various stromal cells and extracellular matrix and plays critical roles on tumor progression and therapy. Although further investigations are urgently required to develop robust methods for more specific tumor-targeting and well-controlled nanomaterials, the applications of tumor microenvironment regulation-based nanotechnology for safer and more effective anticancer nanomedicines hold great promise to eventually revolutionize the current landscape of cancer therapy.

  7. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Materials for Bioresorbable Radio Frequency Electronics (pages 3526–3531)

      Suk-Won Hwang, Xian Huang, Jung-Hun Seo, Jun-Kyul Song, Stanley Kim, Sami Hage-Ali, Hyun-Joong Chung, Hu Tao, Fiorenzo G. Omenetto, Zhenqiang Ma and John A. Rogers

      Article first published online: 17 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300920

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      Materials, device designs and manufacturing approaches are presented for classes of RF electronic components that are capable of complete dissolution in water or biofluids. All individual passive/active components as well as system-level examples such as wireless RF energy harvesting circuits exploit active materials that are biocompatible. The results provide diverse building blocks for physically transient forms of electronics, of particular potential value in bioresorbable medical implants with wireless power transmission and communication capabilities.

    2. Diamond-Lipid Hybrids Enhance Chemotherapeutic Tolerance and Mediate Tumor Regression (pages 3532–3541)

      Laura Moore, Edward Kai-Hua Chow, Eiji Osawa, J. Michael Bishop and Dean Ho

      Article first published online: 15 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300343

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      Self-assembled nanodiamond-lipid hybrid particles (NDLPs) harness the potent interaction between the nanodiamond (ND)-surface and small molecules, while providing a mechanism for cell-targeted imaging and therapy of triple negative breast cancers. Epidermal growth factor receptor-targeted NDLPs are highly biocompatible particles that provide cell-specific imaging, promote tumor retention of ND-complexes, prevent epirubicin toxicities and mediate regression of triple negative breast cancers.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      From Channel-Forming Ionic Liquid Crystals Exhibiting Humidity-Induced Phase Transitions to Nanostructured Ion-Conducting Polymer Membranes (Adv. Mater. 26/2013) (page 3542)

      Heng Zhang, Lei Li, Martin Möller, Xiaomin Zhu, Jaime J. Hernandez Rueda, Martin Rosenthal and Dimitri A. Ivanov

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370172

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      Designing the topology of ionconducting nano-channels is of paramount interest for applications in separation and catalysis. Dimitri A. Ivanov, Xiaomin Zhu, and co-workers demonstrate on page 3543 how the size and structure of nano-channels can be fine-tuned by using humidity-induced phase transitions in a novel wedge-shaped amphiphile bearing a sulfonate group at the tip. The resulting selfassembled structure can be arrested by photopolymerization to obtain free-standing mechanically stable membranes.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Report
    8. Communications
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. From Channel-Forming Ionic Liquid Crystals Exhibiting Humidity-Induced Phase Transitions to Nanostructured Ion-Conducting Polymer Membranes (pages 3543–3548)

      Heng Zhang, Lei Li, Martin Möller, Xiaomin Zhu, Jaime J. Hernandez Rueda, Martin Rosenthal and Dimitri A. Ivanov

      Article first published online: 12 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201205097

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      A novel wedge-shaped amphiphilic molecule bearing a sulfonate group at the tip displays humidity-induced phase transitions from a hexagonal columnar structure to a bicontinuous cubic phase. The mesophases can be frozen by photopolymerization of acrylic end-groups resulting in free-standing membranes with different topology of ionic nanochannels. The obtained membranes with a well-ordered ionic channel structure hold promise for applications in separation and catalysis.

    2. Surface Functionalization of Gold Nanoparticles with Red Blood Cell Membranes (pages 3549–3553)

      Weiwei Gao, Che-Ming J. Hu, Ronnie H. Fang, Brian T. Luk, Jing Su and Liangfang Zhang

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300638

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      Gold nanoparticles are enclosed in cellular membranes derived from natural red blood cells (RBCs) by a top-down approach. The gold nanoparticles exhibit a complete membrane surface layer and biological characteristics of the source cells. The combination of inorganic gold nanoparticles with biological membranes is a compelling way to develop biomimetic gold nanostructures for future applications, such as those requiring evasion of the immune system.

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      Effective Collection and Detection of Airborne Species Using SERS-Based Detection and Localized Electrodynamic Precipitation (pages 3554–3559)

      En-Chiang Lin, Jun Fang, Se-Chul Park, Thomas Stauden, Joerg Pezoldt and Heiko O. Jacobs

      Article first published online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300472

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      Three different delivery concepts (standard diffusion, global electrodynamic precipitation, and localized nanolens-based precipitation) and three different SERS enhancement layers (a silver film, a nanolens-based localized silver nanoparticle film, and the standard AgFON) are compared. The nanolens concept is applied to increase the SERS signal: a factor of 633, when compared to a standard mechanism of diffusion, is observed.

    4. Contact-Engineered and Void-Involved Silicon/Carbon Nanohybrids as Lithium-Ion-Battery Anodes (pages 3560–3565)

      Bin Wang, Xianglong Li, Xianfeng Zhang, Bin Luo, Yunbo Zhang and Linjie Zhi

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300844

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      A novel anode structure composed of silicon nanowires dwelling in graphitic tubes is developed. The thus-fabricated 1D/1D hybrid structure exhibits good rate capability and remarkable cycling stability, which mainly originates from their structural advantages including the built-in void spaces and the robust line-to-line contact mode between the components.

    5. Programmable Fractal Nanostructured Interfaces for Specific Recognition and Electrochemical Release of Cancer Cells (pages 3566–3570)

      Pengchao Zhang, Li Chen, Tailin Xu, Hongliang Liu, Xueli Liu, Jingxin Meng, Gao Yang, Lei Jiang and Shutao Wang

      Article first published online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300888

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      Topographic recognition of cancer cells is triggered by fractal gold nanostructures (FAuNSs), leading to dramatically enhanced recognition capability and efficient release of cancer cells with little damage. The unique characteristic of FAuNSs is the similar fractal dimension of their surface and that of a cancer cell. The design of fractal nanostructures will open up opportunities for functional design of bio-interfaces for highly efficient recognition and release of disease-related rare cells, which will improve detection in a clinical environment.

    6. Highly Enhanced Light Extraction from Surface Plasmonic Loss Minimized Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 3571–3577)

      Jung-Bum Kim, Jeong-Hwan Lee, Chang-Ki Moon, Sei-Yong Kim and Jang-Joo Kim

      Article first published online: 12 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201205233

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      Extremely high light out-coupling efficiency from a transparent organic light-emitting diode integrated with microstructures on both sides of the device is reported. The metal free device offers dramatically reduced surface plasmonic and intrinsic absorption losses. Moreover, high refractive index micropatterns with optimal light extraction condition are fabricated based on the well-matched analysis of optical simulations.

    7. Highly Conductive SrVO3 as a Bottom Electrode for Functional Perovskite Oxides (pages 3578–3582)

      Jarrett A. Moyer, Craig Eaton and Roman Engel-Herbert

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300900

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      Stoichiometric SrVO3 thin films grown by hybrid molecular beam epitaxy are demonstrated, meeting the stringent requirements of an ideal bottom electrode material. They display an order of magnitude lower room temperature resistivity and superior chemical stability, compared to the commonly employed SrRuO3, as well as atomically smooth surfaces. Excellent structural compatibility with perovskite and related structures renders SrVO3 a high performance electrode material with the potential to promote the creation of new functional oxide electronic devices.

    8. Wet Chemical Synthesis of Graphene (pages 3583–3587)

      Siegfried Eigler, Michael Enzelberger-Heim, Stefan Grimm, Philipp Hofmann, Wolfgang Kroener, Andreas Geworski, Christoph Dotzer, Michael Röckert, Jie Xiao, Christian Papp, Ole Lytken, Hans-Peter Steinrück, Paul Müller and Andreas Hirsch

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300155

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      A suitable technology for the preparation of graphene based on versatile wet chemistry is presented for the first time. The protocol allows the wet chemical synthesis of graphene from a new form of graphene oxide that consists of an intact hexagonal σ-framework of C-atoms. Thus, it can be easily reduced to graphene that is no longer dominated by defects.

    9. Titania Woodpiles with Complete Three-Dimensional Photonic Bandgaps in the Visible (pages 3588–3592)

      Andreas Frölich, Joachim Fischer, Thomas Zebrowski, Kurt Busch and Martin Wegener

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300896

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      Titania woodpile photonic crystals are fabricated by a combination of stimulated-emission depletion direct laser writing and a novel titania double-inversion procedure. The procedure relies on atomic-layer deposition, which is also used to fine-tune the template geometry to maximize the gapsize. Angle- and polarization-resolved transmittance spectroscopy and a comparison with theory provide evidence for the first complete photonic bandgap in the visible.

    10. Thousand-Fold Increase in Optical Storage Density by Polychromatic Address Multiplexing on Self-Assembled DNA Nanostructures (pages 3593–3598)

      Mohammad D. Mottaghi and Chris Dwyer

      Article first published online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301141

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      A super-resolution optical storage technique enabled by DNA nanotechnology and the design of resonance energy transfer (RET) networks are demonstrated. The enhancement in storage density stems from non-linear interactions between excitons on the nanostructured RET circuits, which permit large-scale multiplexing with a small set of addressing wavelengths and a single output channel.

    11. Enzyme-Directed Assembly of a Nanoparticle Probe in Tumor Tissue (pages 3599–3604)

      Miao-Ping Chien, Matthew P. Thompson, Christopher V. Barback, Ti-Hsuan Ku, David J. Hall and Nathan C. Gianneschi

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300823

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      Enzyme-directed assembly in vivo: A targeting strategy is demonstrated, which leads to an active accumulation of nanoparticles by virtue of an assembly event specific to endogenous, enzymatic biochemical signals associated with tumor tissue. The viability of this approach is examined through a proof-of-concept study showing enzyme-directed particle targeting and accumulation in human xenograft tumors in mice following intravenous injection, and the retention of particles is demonstrated within tumors for extended periods of time.

    12. Non-Invasive Synergistic Treatment of Brain Tumors by Targeted Chemotherapeutic Delivery and Amplified Focused Ultrasound-Hyperthermia Using Magnetic Nanographene Oxide (pages 3605–3611)

      Hung-Wei Yang, Mu-Yi Hua, Tsong-Long Hwang, Kun-Ju Lin, Chiung-Yin Huang, Rung-Ywan Tsai, Chen-Chi M. Ma, Po-Hung Hsu, Shiaw-Pyng Wey, Peng-Wei Hsu, Pin-Yuan Chen, Yin-Cheng Huang, Yu-Jen Lu, Tzu-Chen Yen, Li-Ying Feng, Chih-Wen Lin, Hao-Li Liu and Kuo-Chen Wei

      Article first published online: 27 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301046

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      The combination of chemo-thermal therapy is the best strategy to ablate tumors, but how to heat deep tumor tissues effectively without side-damage is a challenge. Here, a systemically delivered nanocarrier is designed with multiple advantages, including superior heat absorption, highly efficient hyperthermia, high drug capacity, specific targeting ability, and molecular imaging, to achieve both high antitumor efficacy and effective amplification of hyperthermia with minimal side effects.

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