Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 25 Issue 28

Special Issue: 10th Anniversary of the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China

July 26, 2013

Volume 25, Issue 28

Pages 3749–3921

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Research News
    1. You have free access to this content
      NCNST 10th Anniversary: (Adv. Mater. 28/2013) (page 3749)

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370179

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      In the true spirit of its collaborative founding by three Chinese universities, the National Center for Nanosciences and Technology of China this year celebrates its 10th anniversary with two special issues guest-edited by Professor Yuliang Zhao: one in Advanced Materials (Issue 28/2013) and one in Small (Issue 14/2013). The enormous potential of nanotechnology drives the NCNST's program to strategically enhance basic and applied research, increase creative ability, and to foster a creative system for scientific and technological progress in China. Front cover courtesy of Xiaohui Qiu and co-workers.

  2. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Research News
    1. You have free access to this content
      Special Issue: 10th Anniversary of the National Center for Nanoscience and Technology of China (Adv. Mater. 28/2013) (page 3924)

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370181

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graphene-based materials have recently attracted considerable attention for hydrogen generation from light-driven water splitting. Due to its unique structure and fantastic physicochemical properties, graphene can function as an electron acceptor and transporter, a co-catalyst, a photocatalyst, and a photosensitizer, in order to enhance the hydrogen evolution activity efficiently. Jian Ru Gong and co-workers review the developments in this field on p. 3820.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Research News
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 28/2013)

      Version of Record online: 21 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370182

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Research News
  5. Editorial

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Research News
    1. You have free access to this content
  6. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Research News
    1. Recent Advances in Design and Fabrication of Upconversion Nanoparticles and Their Safe Theranostic Applications (pages 3758–3779)

      Zhanjun Gu, Liang Yan, Gan Tian, Shoujian Li, Zhifang Chai and Yuliang Zhao

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301197

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This review discusses the recent advances in the fabrication and surface functionalization of upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) with the desired size, enhanced upconversion luminescence and combined multifunctions, which is to create a powerful theranostic platform of in vivo multicolor/multimodal bioimaging with NIR-triggered drug/gene delivery and photodynamic therapy.

  7. Progress Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Research News
    1. Nanomaterials for Reducing Amyloid Cytotoxicity (pages 3780–3801)

      Min Zhang, Xiaobo Mao, Yue Yu, Chen-Xuan Wang, Yan-Lian Yang and Chen Wang

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301210

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This review highlights the recent progress on therapeutic applications of nanomaterials in amyloid diseases. Nanomaterials as potential anti-amyloid drugs and drug delivery systems for currently available molecules are reviewed and the interaction mechanism between amyloid peptides and various nanomaterials is also discussed.

  8. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Research News
    1. Nanomaterials for Ultrasensitive Protein Detection (pages 3802–3819)

      Yi Zhang, Yongming Guo, Yunlei Xianyu, Wenwen Chen, Yuyun Zhao and Xingyu Jiang

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301334

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Nanomaterials provide exciting tools for ultrasensitive detection of proteins. Detection of clinically relevant protein biomarkers down to the zeptomolar regime is possible. These methods could be integrated with microfluidics and other analytical technologies to assay important proteins in complex biological samples.

    2. Graphene-Based Materials for Hydrogen Generation from Light-Driven Water Splitting (pages 3820–3839)

      Guancai Xie, Kai Zhang, Beidou Guo, Qian Liu, Liang Fang and Jian Ru Gong

      Version of Record online: 1 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301207

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Graphene-based materials have recently attracted great attention in hydrogen generation from light-driven water splitting. Due to its unique structure and fantastic physicochemical properties, graphene can function as an electron acceptor and transporter, a cocatalyst, a photocatalyst, and a photosensitizer, to efficiently enhance the hydrogen evolution activity.

    3. Plasmonics in Nanostructures (pages 3840–3856)

      Zheyu Fang and Xing Zhu

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301203

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Plasmonics has developed into one of the rapidly growing research topics for nanophotonics. With advanced nanofabrication techniques, a broad variety of plasmonic nanostructures have been designed and fabricated. Combining the merits of both surface plasmons and graphene, the graphene photodetection can be greatly enhanced, leading to a new research area as graphene plasmonics.

  9. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Back Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Editorial
    7. Review
    8. Progress Report
    9. Reviews
    10. Research News
    1. Core–Shell Noble Metal Nanostructures Templated by Gold Nanorods (pages 3857–3862)

      Shuai Hou, Xiaona Hu, Tao Wen, Wenqi Liu and Xiaochun Wu

      Version of Record online: 24 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301169

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gold standards: The main research progress in core–shell noble metal nanostructures templated by gold nanorods (Au NRs) is summarized with regards to synthesis, optical, and catalytic properties. Design and fabrication of core–shell hybrid nanostructures are demonstrated to be effective not only for optimizing and expanding intrinsic properties but also for creating novel localized surface-plasmon-enhanced optical and catalytic functionalities.

    2. Strongly Coupled Nanorod Vertical Arrays for Plasmonic Sensing (pages 3863–3868)

      Wenbo Wei, Kuan Chen and Guanglu Ge

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301181

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Arrays of noble metal nanorods that support an enhanced local electric field by plasmon coupling show great potential for optical sensing. This Research News article focuses on this rapidly developing field by introducing the mechanisms, characteristics, and preparation methods of nanorod arrays used in plasmonic sensing, along with a perspective for future development and technical requirements.

    3. Near-Infrared Light-Mediated Nanoplatforms for Cancer Thermo-Chemotherapy and Optical Imaging (pages 3869–3880)

      Zhenjiang Zhang, Jing Wang and Chunying Chen

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301890

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Photothermal inorganic nanoparticles responsive to near infrared light provide new opportunities for simultaneous targeted delivery of heat and chemotherapeutics to tumors in pursuit of synergistic effects for efficacy enhancement. The state of the art in nanoparticle-induced thermo-chemotherapy and optical imaging is summarized, and the major nanoplatforms based on gold nanoparticles, carbon nanomaterials, palladium nanosheets, and copper-based nanocrystals are discussed.

    4. Nanodevices for Cellular Interfaces and Electrophysiological Recording (pages 3881–3887)

      Long Yang, Yuanchang Li and Ying Fang

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301194

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Advances in nanomaterials and nanotechnologies offer important opportunities for cellular interfaces. This Research News highlights recent progress on cellular electrophysiology enabled by using nanostructures as active elements of bioelectronic devices. In addition, some exciting directions in flexible, 3D bioelectronics are discussed.

    5. Host–Guest Supramolecular Nanosystems for Cancer Diagnostics and Therapeutics (pages 3888–3898)

      Lei Wang, Li-li Li, Yun-shan Fan and Hao Wang

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301202

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent momentous advances in the implementation of typical supramolecular hosts (cyclodextrins, calixarenes, cucurbiturils and metallo-hosts) and their nanosystems in cancer diagnostics and therapeutics are reviewed. The evolution of supramolecular nanosystems is discussed; from structural control and characterization to their diagnostic and therapeutic exploitation in the biomedical field.

    6. Carbonaceous Electrode Materials for Supercapacitors (pages 3899–3904)

      Long Hao, Xianglong Li and Linjie Zhi

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301204

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Three representative strategies for the development of carbon-based supercapacitors are outlined in this Research News in combination with recent progress, including the incorporation of heteroatom-containing functionalities, construction of subnanopores, and exploitation of new synthesis formulas. The elaborate coupling of heteroatom-containing functionalities, subnanopores, and new synthetic approaches holds great potential in advancing the performances of carbon-based supercapacitors.

    7. DNA-Based Self-Assembly for Functional Nanomaterials (pages 3905–3914)

      Zhen-Gang Wang and Baoquan Ding

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301450

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      This article discusses the significant roles of DNA self-assembly in materials science and nanotechnology, including the formation of hydrogels, induced three-dimensional crystallization, the templated synthesis of conductive polymers, and nanomedical vehicles. In particular, the designability, specific recognition, and inherent dynamics enable DNA self-assemblies to be the key elements in regulating the functions of DNA-based bulk-scale and nanoscale materials.

    8. Low-Dimensional Te-Based Nanostructures (pages 3915–3921)

      Qisheng Wang, Muhammad Safdar, Zhenxing Wang and Jun He

      Version of Record online: 27 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301128

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Recent progress in synthesis methods of low-dimensional Te-based nanostructures and unique physical properties of Te-based nanoscale electronic and photoelectronic devices is reviewed. Low-dimensional Te-based nanostructures attract huge attention due to their novel physical properties such as surface-state effects, photoelectricity, phase changes, and thermoelectricity.

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION