Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 25 Issue 29

August 7, 2013

Volume 25, Issue 29

Pages 3925–4057

  1. Cover Picture

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    5. Masthead
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    7. Correction
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    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
    11. Communications
    12. Research News
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      Gas Storage: High-Throughput Analytical Model to Evaluate Materials for Temperature Swing Adsorption Processes (Adv. Mater. 29/2013) (page 3925)

      Julian P. Sculley, Wolfgang M. Verdegaal, Weigang Lu, Mario Wriedt and Hong-Cai Zhou

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370184

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      A model is developed to evaluate adsorptive materials for their working capacities and regeneration energies for a temperature swing process. Hong-Cai Zhou and co-workers show that this model allows different materials to be quickly and efficiently compared. Further details can be found on page 3957.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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      Interfaces: Ultralow Contact Resistance at an Epitaxial Metal/Oxide Heterojunction Through Interstitial Site Doping (Adv. Mater. 29/2013) (page 3926)

      Scott A. Chambers, Meng Gu, Peter V. Sushko, Hao Yang, Chongmin Wang and Nigel D. Browning

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370185

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      Epitaxial Cr atoms on SrTiO3(001) generate an ideal Ohmic contact with excellent adhesion and a very low contact resistance. Scott Chambers, Meng Gu, and co-workers show on page 4001 that this occurs because of Cr indiffusion to interstitial sites, charge transfer to Ti ions, and metalinduced downward band bending.

  3. Back Cover

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      White OLEDs: Color in the Corners: ITO-Free White OLEDs with Angular Color Stability (Adv. Mater. 29/2013) (page 4060)

      Whitney Gaynor, Simone Hofmann, M. Greyson Christoforo, Christoph Sachse, Saahil Mehra, Alberto Salleo, Michael D. McGehee, Malte C. Gather, Björn Lüssem, Lars Müller-Meskamp, Peter Peumans and Karl Leo

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370186

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      High-efficiency white organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) are fabricated by Whitney Gaynor and co-workers (see page 4006), using transparent electrodes composed of silver nanowires embedded in a transparent polymer. In addition to having a performance suitable for large-area devices, these solution-processed electrodes scatter light to enhance the Lambertian emission profile of the OLEDs as well as stabilize the emission color over all viewing angles.

  4. Masthead

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      Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 29/2013)

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370187

  5. Contents

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    3. Inside Front Cover
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    5. Masthead
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  6. Correction

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      Correction: Electron and Ion Transport in Li2O2 (page 3933)

      Oliver Gerbig, Rotraut Merkle and Joachim Maier

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201302874

      This article corrects:

      Electron and Ion Transport In Li2O2

      Vol. 25, Issue 22, 3129–3133, Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2013

  7. Progress Reports

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    1. Mechanochromic Photonic Gels (pages 3934–3947)

      Edwin P. Chan, Joseph J. Walish, Augustine M. Urbas and Edwin L. Thomas

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300692

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      Mechanochromic photonic gels are polymer gels that display mechanical strain-responsive structural color. These gels are interesting materials for mechanochromic sensing applications due to their highly tunable mechanical and optical properties. In this progress report, recent advances in developing mechanochromic photonic gels that display strain-responsive optical properties for scalable sensors are highlighted.

    2. Tuning Molecular Self-Assembly on Bulk Insulator Surfaces by Anchoring of the Organic Building Blocks (pages 3948–3956)

      Philipp Rahe, Markus Kittelmann, Julia L. Neff, Markus Nimmrich, Michael Reichling, Philipp Maass and Angelika Kühnle

      Version of Record online: 12 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300604

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      Molecular self-assembly constitutes a versatile strategy for creating functional structures on surfaces. Its current status on dielectric surfaces investigated under ultrahigh vacuum conditions at room temperature is reviewed. Currently, a limitation often arises from the weak and unspecific binding of molecules to dielectric surfaces. To address this challenge, a systematic discussion of general anchoring strategies is provided here.

  8. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    7. Correction
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Communications
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    11. Communications
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    1. High-Throughput Analytical Model to Evaluate Materials for Temperature Swing Adsorption Processes (pages 3957–3961)

      Julian P. Sculley, Wolfgang M. Verdegaal, Weigang Lu, Mario Wriedt and Hong-Cai Zhou

      Version of Record online: 25 APR 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201204695

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      In order for any material to be considered in a post-combustion carbon capture technology, it must have high working capacities of CO2 from flue gas and be regenerable using as little energy as possible. Shown here is an easy to use method to calculate both working capacities and regeneration energies and thereby predict optimal desorption conditions for any material.

    2. Facile Fabrication of Single-Crystal-Diamond Nanostructures with Ultrahigh Aspect Ratio (pages 3962–3967)

      Ye Tao and Christian Degen

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301343

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      A robust and facile approach for making single-crystal-diamond MEMS and NEMS devices is presented. The approach relies entirely on commercial diamond material and standard cleanroom processes. As an example, batch fabrication of cantilever beams of thickness down to 45 nm and aspect ratios exceeding 2000:1 is demonstrated.

    3. Free-Standing 1D Assemblies of Plasmonic Nanoparticles (pages 3968–3972)

      Bin Su, Yuchen Wu, Yue Tang, Yi Chen, Wenlong Cheng and Lei Jiang

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301003

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      A simple yet effective method to generate free-standing 1D assemblies of gold nanoparticles by a combined top-down and bottom-up approach in conjunction with superhydrophobicity-directed fluid drying is reported. The free-standing nanoparticle assemblies can be as thin ca. 45 nm and as long as ca. 30 μm, yet mechanically strong without collapsing when held at one end. Furthermore, the 1D nanoparticle assemblies could be used as plasmonic waveguides.

    4. 10.2% Power Conversion Efficiency Polymer Tandem Solar Cells Consisting of Two Identical Sub-Cells (pages 3973–3978)

      Jingbi You, Chun-Chao Chen, Ziruo Hong, Ken Yoshimura, Kenichiro Ohya, Run Xu, Shenglin Ye, Jing Gao, Gang Li and Yang Yang

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300964

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      Polymer tandem solar cells with 10.2% power conversion efficiency are demonstrated via stacking two PDTP-DFBT:PC71BM bulk heterojunctions, connected by MoO3/PEDOT:PSS/ZnO as an interconnecting layer. The tandem solar cells increase the power conversion efficiency of the PDTP-DFBT:PC71BM system from 8.1% to 10.2%, successfully demonstrating polymer tandem solar cells with identical sub-cells of double-digit efficiency.

    5. Graphene-Network-Backboned Architectures for High-Performance Lithium Storage (pages 3979–3984)

      Yongji Gong, Shubin Yang, Zheng Liu, Lulu Ma, Robert Vajtai and Pulickel M. Ajayan

      Version of Record online: 13 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301051

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      An efficient hydrothermal approach is demonstrated to fabricate a series of graphene-network-backboned hybrid architectures such as MoS2/graphene and FeOx/graphene, showing high specific surface area, porous structure, and continuous graphene networks. Such unique architectures exhibit a high reversible capacity (about 1100 mA h g−1) for lithium ion batteries. High-rate capabilities of full charge to discharge in 25–45 s with a long cycle life (1500 cycles) are achieved at different rates.

    6. Efficient Inkjet Printing of Graphene (pages 3985–3992)

      Jiantong Li, Fei Ye, Sam Vaziri, Mamoun Muhammed, Max C. Lemme and Mikael Östling

      Version of Record online: 31 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300361

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      An efficient and mature inkjet printing technology is introduced for mass production of coffee-ring-free patterns of high-quality graphene at high resolution (unmarked scale bars are 100 μm). Typically, several passes of printing and a simple baking allow fabricating a variety of good-performance electronic devices, including transparent conductors, embedded resistors, thin film transistors, and micro-supercapacitors.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Correction
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Communications
    10. Frontispiece
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      Structured Metal Film as a Perfect Absorber (Adv. Mater. 29/2013) (page 3993)

      Xiang Xiong, Shang-Chi Jiang, Yu-Hui Hu, Ru-Wen Peng and Mu Wang

      Version of Record online: 1 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370189

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      A new 3D absorber, four-tined fish-spear-like resonators (FFRs) is constructed by a two-photon polymerization process. More than 90% absorbance is realized and the resonance occurs in the space around the tines, as reported by Mu Wang and co-workers on page 3994. In this way the heat transferred from the absorbed energy can be dissipated easily. Since a continuous metallic thin film covers the structure, it is perfectly thermo- and electroconductive. These features are strongly desired in many applications.

  10. Communications

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    1. Structured Metal Film as a Perfect Absorber (pages 3994–4000)

      Xiang Xiong, Shang-Chi Jiang, Yu-Hui Hu, Ru-Wen Peng and Mu Wang

      Version of Record online: 10 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300223

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      A new type of absorber, a four-tined fish-spear-like resonator (FFR), constructed by the two-photon polymerization process, is reported. An absorbance of more than 90% is experimentally realized and the resonance occurs in the space between the tines. Since a continuous layer of metallic thin film covers the structure, it is perfectly thermo- and electroconductive, which is the mostly desired feature for many applications.

    2. Ultralow Contact Resistance at an Epitaxial Metal/Oxide Heterojunction Through Interstitial Site Doping (pages 4001–4005)

      Scott A. Chambers, Meng Gu, Peter V. Sushko, Hao Yang, Chongmin Wang and Nigel D. Browning

      Version of Record online: 6 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301030

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      Heteroepitaxial growth of Cr metal on Nb-doped SrTiO3(001) is accompanied by Cr diffusion to interstitial sites within the first few atomic planes, an anchoring of the Cr film to the substrate, charge transfer from Cr to Ti, and metallization of the near-surface region, as depicted in the figure. The contact resistance of the resulting interface is exceedingly low.

    3. Color in the Corners: ITO-Free White OLEDs with Angular Color Stability (pages 4006–4013)

      Whitney Gaynor, Simone Hofmann, M. Greyson Christoforo, Christoph Sachse, Saahil Mehra, Alberto Salleo, Michael D. McGehee, Malte C. Gather, Björn Lüssem, Lars Müller-Meskamp, Peter Peumans and Karl Leo

      Version of Record online: 13 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300923

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      High-efficiency white OLEDs fabricated on silver nanowire-based composite transparent electrodes show almost perfectly Lambertian emission and superior angular color stability, imparted by electrode light scattering. The OLED efficiencies are comparable to those fabricated using indium tin oxide. The transparent electrodes are fully solution-processable, thin-film compatible, and have a figure of merit suitable for large-area devices.

    4. High-Optical-Quality Ferroelectric Film Wet-Processed from a Ferroelectric Columnar Liquid Crystal as Observed by Non-linear-Optical Microscopy (pages 4014–4017)

      Fumito Araoka, Shiori Masuko, Akinori Kogure, Daigo Miyajima, Takuzo Aida and Hideo Takezoe

      Version of Record online: 6 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301380

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      The self-organization of ferroelectric columnar liquid crystals (FCLCs) is demonstrated. Columnar order is spontaneously formed in thin films made by the wet-process due to its liquid crystallinity. Electric-field application results in high optical quality and uniform spontaneous polarization. Such good processability and controllability of the wet-processed FCLC films provide us with potential organic ferroelectric materials for device applications.

    5. Flexible, Transparent Contacts for Inorganic Nanostructures and Thin Films (pages 4018–4022)

      Daniel B. Turner-Evans, Hal Emmer, Christopher T. Chen and Harry A. Atwater

      Version of Record online: 10 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201300927

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      A transparent, flexible contact is developed using Ni nanoparticles and Ag nanowires and demonstrated on free-standing, polymer embedded, Si microwire solar cells. Contact yields of over 99% and a series resistance of 14 Ω cm2 are demonstrated.

    6. Centrifugal Shape Sorting and Optical Response of Polyhedral Gold Nanoparticles (pages 4023–4027)

      Yu Jin Shin, Emilie Ringe, Michelle L. Personick, M. Fernanda Cardinal, Chad A. Mirkin, Laurence D. Marks, Richard P. Van Duyne and Mark C. Hersam

      Version of Record online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301278

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      A centrifugal route for separating small {110}-faceted gold nanostructures, namely rhombic dodecahedra (RD) and triangular bipyramids (BPs), which form simultaneously during synthesis and cannot be separated by means of conventional filtration methods, is presented. The centrifuged solution shows two distinct bands: i) RD and ii) BPs, as verified in the corresponding scanning electron microscopy images. The sorted BPs show a refractive index dependence 2.5 times that of the as-synthesized, unsorted mixture.

    7. Dielectrophoretically Aligned Carbon Nanotubes to Control Electrical and Mechanical Properties of Hydrogels to Fabricate Contractile Muscle Myofibers (pages 4028–4034)

      Javier Ramón-Azcón, Samad Ahadian, Mehdi Estili, Xiaobin Liang, Serge Ostrovidov, Hirokazu Kaji, Hitoshi Shiku, Murugan Ramalingam, Ken Nakajima, Yoshio Sakka, Ali Khademhosseini and Tomokazu Matsue

      Version of Record online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301300

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      Dielectrophoresis is used to align carbon nanotubes (CNTs) within gelatin methacrylate (GelMA) hydrogels in a facile and rapid manner. Aligned GelMA-CNT hydrogels show higher electrical properties compared with pristine and randomly distributed CNTs in GelMA hydrogels. The muscle cells cultured on these materials demonstrate higher maturation compared with cells cultured on pristine and randomly distributed CNTs in GelMA hydrogels.

    8. All-Solid-State Flexible Ultrathin Micro-Supercapacitors Based on Graphene (pages 4035–4042)

      Zhiqiang Niu, Li Zhang, Lili Liu, Bowen Zhu, Haibo Dong and Xiaodong Chen

      Version of Record online: 29 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301332

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      Flexible, compact, ultrathin and all-solid-state micro-supercapacitors are prepared by coating H3PO4/PVA gel electrolyte onto micro-patterned rGO interdigitated electrodes prepared by combining photolithography with selective electrophoretic deposition.

    9. Surface Octahedral Distortions and Atomic Design of Perovskite Interfaces (pages 4043–4048)

      A. Yu. Petrov, X. Torrelles, A. Verna, H. Xu, A. Cossaro, M. Pedio, J. Garcia-Barriocanal, G. R. Castro and B. A. Davidson

      Version of Record online: 28 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301841

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      Atomic engineering of perovskite films and interfaces is significantly improved by in situ optimization of reflection high-energy electron diffraction (RHEED) features resulting from surface BO6 octahedral rotations seen during molecular-beam epitaxy growth. This approach yields Sr-doped manganite films across the phase diagram with magnetotransport properties that are, for the first time, identical to bulk single crystals. Careful structural analysis of manganite/titanate interfaces shows that cation intermixing and unit cell dilations are eliminated, while BO6 rotations and Jahn-Teller-type elongations are nearly completely suppressed at the interface.

  11. Research News

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    1. Tuning of Cell–Biomaterial Anchorage for Tissue Regeneration (pages 4049–4057)

      Aldo Leal-Egaña, Aránzazu Díaz-Cuenca and Aldo R. Boccaccini

      Version of Record online: 4 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301227

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      Focus is given on the analysis of the specific and unspecific mechanisms mediating cell-matrix interactions. Furthermore, because natural tissue regeneration is characterized by the dynamic attachment/detachment of different cell populations, the advanced design of scaffolds for tissue engineering, based in the spatiotemporal tuning of cell–matrix anchorage, is discussed.

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