Advanced Materials

Cover image for Vol. 25 Issue 47

December 17, 2013

Volume 25, Issue 47

Pages 6775–6910

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Reviews
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Giant Vesicle Arrays: A Simple and Versatile Method for the Formation of Arrays of Giant Vesicles with Controlled Size and Composition (Adv. Mater. 47/2013) (page 6775)

      You Jung Kang, Harrison S. Wostein and Sheereen Majd

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370293

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      S. Majd and co-workers report a simple approach for the preparation of cell-sized liposomes with integral membrane proteins on page 6834. In this approach, hydrogel-stamped lipid/protein deposits grow, upon application of an AC electric field, into giant liposomes of controlled size and composition. The resulting vesicles can be applied in membrane and protein studies as well as in biotechnology.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Reviews
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
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      Epidermal Electronics: Materials and Optimized Designs for Human-Machine Interfaces Via Epidermal Electronics (Adv. Mater. 47/2013) (page 6776)

      Jae-Woong Jeong, Woon-Hong Yeo, Aadeel Akhtar, James J. S. Norton, Young-Jin Kwack, Shuo Li, Sung-Young Jung, Yewang Su, Woosik Lee, Jing Xia, Huanyu Cheng, Yonggang Huang, Woon-Seop Choi, Timothy Bretl and John A. Rogers

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370294

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      Thin, soft, and elastic electronics, which have physical properties well matched to the epidermis, can be conformally and robustly integrated with the skin. Materials and optimized design of such devices are presented for surface electromyography (sEMG) by J. A. Rogers and co-workers on page 6839. The skin-integrated electronics shown here enable use of sEMG for advanced forms of human-machine interfaces.

  3. Back Cover

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Reviews
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
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      Graphene: Van der Waals Epitaxial Double Heterostructure: InAs/Single-Layer Graphene/InAs (Adv. Mater. 47/2013) (page 6914)

      Young Joon Hong, Jae Won Yang, Wi Hyoung Lee, Rodney S. Ruoff, Kwang S. Kim and Takashi Fukui

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370295

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      Epitaxial semiconductor/graphene double heterostructures are fabricated by vapor-phase van der Waals epitaxy of InAs on both sides of suspended graphene, as reported on page 6847. K. S. Kim, Y. J. Hong and co-workers demonstrate that the weak van der Waals attraction facilitates a preferential growth direction of InAs exclusively along the As-polar direction, which results in a polarity inversion of the double heterostructures. The first-principles and density functional calculations clarify why and how the conductive graphene layer yields the polarity inversion for sp3/sp2/sp3-type double heterostructures.

  4. Masthead

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    10. Communications
    1. Masthead: (Adv. Mater. 47/2013)

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370296

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
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    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Reviews
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Contents: (Adv. Mater. 47/2013) (pages 6777–6782)

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370297

  6. Progress Reports

    1. Top of page
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    3. Inside Front Cover
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    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Reviews
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. 25th Anniversary Article: Progress in Chemistry and Applications of Functional Indigos for Organic Electronics (pages 6783–6800)

      Eric Daniel Głowacki, Gundula Voss and Niyazi Serdar Sariciftci

      Article first published online: 22 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201302652

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      Indigo and its derivatives are natural-origin molecules with a long history, and have been at the center of the development of modern chemistry. Today, these substances are making a come-back in the field of organic electronics.

  7. Reviews

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    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Reviews
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Efficiency Roll-Off in Organic Light-Emitting Diodes (pages 6801–6827)

      Caroline Murawski, Karl Leo and Malte C. Gather

      Article first published online: 9 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301603

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      Organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) suffer from an efficiency decrease at high brightness (so-called “roll-off”). The underlying mechanisms mostly involve exciton quenching processes, but are also attributed to charge imbalance. This review presents these processes in detail and proposes methods to improve the high-brightness performance of OLEDs.

  8. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Reviews
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. You have free access to this content
      Organic Photodetectors: Fully Inkjet-Printed Organic Photodetectors with High Quantum Yield (Adv. Mater. 47/2013) (page 6828)

      G. Azzellino, A. Grimoldi, M. Binda, M. Caironi, D. Natali and M. Sampietro

      Article first published online: 11 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201370298

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      The development of complex optoelectronic systems requires the capability of depositing patterned, functional multilayers by means of a scalable technology. As a step in this direction, D. Natali, M. Caironi, and co-workers demonstrate on page 6829 organic photodetectors manufactured by way of the drop-on-demand inkjet printing technique.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Progress Reports
    8. Reviews
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    1. Fully Inkjet-Printed Organic Photodetectors with High Quantum Yield (pages 6829–6833)

      G. Azzellino, A. Grimoldi, M. Binda, M. Caironi, D. Natali and M. Sampietro

      Article first published online: 16 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201303473

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      Bulk-heterojunction based organic photodetectors are fabricated by means of drop-on-demand inkjet printing with vertical topology, inverted structure, and small footprint (about 100 μm x 100 μm). Due to optimization of the deposition technique, an external quantum efficiency in excess of 80% at 525 nm and a -3dB bandwidth of a few tens of kHz is achieved.

    2. A Simple and Versatile Method for the Formation of Arrays of Giant Vesicles with Controlled Size and Composition (pages 6834–6838)

      You Jung Kang, Harrison S. Wostein and Sheereen Majd

      Article first published online: 17 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201303290

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      A simple and versatile method for the Formation of Arrays of Giant Vesicles with Controlled Size and Composition. The ability of this technique to generate arrays of giant liposomes from a wide range of membrane lipids and protein compositions is demonstrated. The resulting vesicles are utilized for studying protein activity, lipid-protein interactions, and protein-protein interactions.

    3. Materials and Optimized Designs for Human-Machine Interfaces Via Epidermal Electronics (pages 6839–6846)

      Jae-Woong Jeong, Woon-Hong Yeo, Aadeel Akhtar, James J. S. Norton, Young-Jin Kwack, Shuo Li, Sung-Young Jung, Yewang Su, Woosik Lee, Jing Xia, Huanyu Cheng, Yonggang Huang, Woon-Seop Choi, Timothy Bretl and John A. Rogers

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201301921

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Thin, soft, and elastic electronics with physical properties well matched to the epidermis can be conformally and robustly integrated with the skin. Materials and optimized designs for such devices are presented for surface electromyography (sEMG). The findings enable sEMG from wide ranging areas of the body. The measurements have quality sufficient for advanced forms of human-machine interface.

    4. Van der Waals Epitaxial Double Heterostructure: InAs/Single-Layer Graphene/InAs (pages 6847–6853)

      Young Joon Hong, Jae Won Yang, Wi Hyoung Lee, Rodney S. Ruoff, Kwang S. Kim and Takashi Fukui

      Article first published online: 25 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201302312

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      Van der Waals (vdW) epitaxial double heterostructures have been fabricated by vdW epitaxy of InAs nanostructures on both sides of graphene. InAs nanostructures diametrically form on/underneath graphene exclusively along As-polar direction, indicating polarity inversion of the double heterostructures. First-principles and density functional calculations demonstrate how and why InAs easily form to be double heterostructures with polarity inversion.

    5. Synthesis of Chemically Bonded Graphene/Carbon Nanotube Composites and their Application in Large Volumetric Capacitance Supercapacitors (pages 6854–6858)

      Naeyoung Jung, Soongeun Kwon, Dongwook Lee, Dong-Myung Yoon, Young Min Park, Anass Benayad, Jae-Young Choi and Jong Se Park

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201302788

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      Chemically bonded graphene/carbon nanotube composites as flexible supercapacitor electrode materials are synthesized by amide bonding. Carbon nanotubes attached along the edges and onto the surface of graphene act as spacers to increase the electrolyte-accessible surface area. Our lamellar structure electrodes demonstrate the largest volumetric capacitance (165 F cm-3) ever shown by carbon-based electrodes.

    6. Electrically Pumped Mid-Infrared Random Lasers (pages 6859–6863)

      Hou Kun Liang, Bo Meng, Guozhen Liang, Jin Tao, Yidong Chong, Qi Jie Wang and Ying Zhang

      Article first published online: 13 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201303122

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      Electrically pumped random lasers, operating in the mid-infrared regime at λ ≈ 10 μm, are realized for the first time. Randomly distributed air holes are patterned onto a quantum cascade wafer emitting in the transverse-magnetic (TM) polarization. The advantage of employing TM polarized gain medium is that TM modes are more effectively confined in the gain region, and thus improve lasing efficiency and vertical confinement compared to TE modes.

    7. LCST-Type Phase Behavior Induced by Pillar[5]arene/Ionic Liquid Host–Guest Complexation (pages 6864–6867)

      Shengyi Dong, Bo Zheng, Yong Yao, Chengyou Han, Jiayin Yuan, Markus Antonietti and Feihe Huang

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201303652

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      The host−guest complex of dipropoxypillar[5]arene and an ionic liquid 1,3-dimethylimidazolium iodide is found to exhibit a lower critical solution temperature (LCST)-type phase transition in chloroform. This LCST-type phase behavior can be conveniently modulated by experimental parameters and can be easily combined with the ionic liquid for potential application in product and educt separation.

    8. Conjugated Polymeric Zwitterions as Efficient Interlayers in Organic Solar Cells (pages 6868–6873)

      Feng Liu, Zachariah A. Page, Volodimyr V. Duzhko, Thomas P. Russell and Todd Emrick

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201302477

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      Conjugated polymeric zwitterions, when utilized as interlayer materials in bulk heterojunction organic solar cells, lead to significantly enhanced power conversion efficiencies. The electrostatic model of self-aligning dipolar side groups in the vicinity of the metal surface rationalizes the effects of reduced cathode work function, a key factor behind the observed enhanced efficiency.

    9. Immersive Polymer Assembly on Immobilized Particles for Automated Capsule Preparation (pages 6874–6878)

      Joseph J. Richardson, Kang Liang, Kristian Kempe, Hirotaka Ejima, Jiwei Cui and Frank Caruso

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201302696

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      We report a versatile approach for polymer capsule preparation using immobilized particles, which are immersed into polymer solutions either manually or by using an automated robotic dipping machine. This technique produces polyelectrolyte capsules with improved retention over conventionally prepared capsules. Additionally, responsive hydrogel capsules of different diameter can be prepared simultaneously.

    10. High-Performance Oxygen Reduction Electrocatalysts based on Cheap Carbon Black, Nitrogen, and Trace Iron (pages 6879–6883)

      Jing Liu, Xiujuan Sun, Ping Song, Yuwei Zhang, Wei Xing and Weilin Xu

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201302786

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      A real optimal Fe content: For N and Fe co-doped carbon electrocatalysts for oxygen reduction reactions (ORRs) it is found that there is a real optimal trace Fe content (Peak II), which has never been observed before. The real optimal electrocatalyst shows superior high activity for ORR and possesses the best price/performance ratio ever.

    11. Suppressing Thermal Conductivity of Suspended Tri-layer Graphene by Gold Deposition (pages 6884–6888)

      Jiayi Wang, Liyan Zhu, Jie Chen, Baowen Li and John T. L. Thong

      Article first published online: 18 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201303362

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      A simple and general strategy for suppressing the thermal conductivity in graphene is shown. The strategy uses gold nano-particles physically deposited on graphene to continuously reduce the thermal conductivity of graphene with increasing coverage, which demonstrates the potential for practical development of graphene-based devices with tunable thermal conductivity for thermal management.

    12. A Hyperbranched Conjugated Polymer as the Cathode Interlayer for High-Performance Polymer Solar Cells (pages 6889–6894)

      Menglan Lv, Shusheng Li, Jacek J. Jasieniak, Jianhui Hou, Jin Zhu, Zhan'ao Tan, Scott E. Watkins, Yongfang Li and Xiwen Chen

      Article first published online: 7 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201302726

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      An alcohol-soluble hyperbranched conjugated polymer HBPFN with a dimethylamino moiety is synthesized and used as a cathode interlayer. A PCE of 7.7% is obtained for PBDTTT-C-T/PC71BM based solar cells. No obvious interfacial dipole is found at the interface between the active layer and HBPFN however, an interfacial dipole with the cathode could be one of the reasons for the enhanced performance.

    13. Electrolyte-Gated Organic Field-Effect Transistor for Selective Reversible Ion Detection (pages 6895–6899)

      Kerstin Schmoltner, Johannes Kofler, Andreas Klug and Emil J. W. List-Kratochvil

      Article first published online: 19 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201303281

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      An ion-sensitive electrolyte-gated organic field-effect transistor for selective and reversible detection of sodium (Na+) down to 10−6 M is presented. The inherent low voltage – high current operation of these transistors in combination with a state-of-the-art ion-selective membrane proves to be a novel, versatile modular sensor platform.

    14. Understanding TiO2 Size-Dependent Electron Transport Properties of a Graphene-TiO2 Photoanode in Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells Using Conducting Atomic Force Microscopy (pages 6900–6904)

      Ziming He, Hung Phan, Jing Liu, Thuc-Quyen Nguyen and Timothy Thatt Yang Tan

      Article first published online: 1 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201303327

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      Conducting AFM reveals a continuous conduction network of a TiO2-graphene composite in DSSC due to a more intimate contact between the smaller sized TiO2-graphene composite nanosheets,which reduces the internal resistance at TiO2/TiO2 and TiO2/FTO interfaces and ultimately leads to a faster and more efficient electron transport in the photoanode.

    15. Hydrogenated TiO2 Nanocrystals: A Novel Microwave Absorbing Material (pages 6905–6910)

      Ting Xia, Chi Zhang, Nathan A. Oyler and Xiaobo Chen

      Article first published online: 17 SEP 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.201303088

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      Here, we report, for the first time, hydrogenated TiO2 nanocrystals as a novel and exciting microwave absorbing material, based on an innovative collective-movement-of-interfacial-dipole mechanism which causes collective-interfacial-polarization-amplified microwave absorption at the crystalline/disordered and anatase/rutile interfaces. This mechanism is intriguing and upon further exploration may trigger other new concepts and applications.

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