Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

October 1990

Volume 2, Issue 10

Pages fmi–fmi, 450–507

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021001

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Materials in electronics and electrical engineering (pages 450–451)

      Dr. Claus Weyrich

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021002

      Siemens activities are founded on a broad base of materials expertise. Claus Weyrich, head of materials science and electronics at the Siemns laboratories in Munich and Erlangen, introduces this special “Siemens Research '90” issue by describing the important criteria for the introduction of new materials and their development, and takes a look at future requirements for materials, especially in the electronics area.

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Photoreactive polymers for electronics (pages 452–457)

      Dr. Roland Rubner

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021003

      Light-induced changes in the properties of materials are of major importance in the electronics industry. Some examples, including photoresists for producing submicron structures (see figure), the photopatternable insulating materials, are reviewed and the polymeric materials employed are described.

    2. Piezoelectric Ceramics (pages 458–463)

      Dr. Helmut Thomann

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021004

      Surface acoustic wave filters and delay lines are two application in electronics of piezoelectric ceramics such as LiNbO3 LiTaO3 and BaTiO3, materials which convert a mechanical stimulus into an electrical signal. The basic physics and crystal chemistry of the materials, including ferroelectric ceramics, are described and an outline for further development given.

    3. III/V semiconductors: Substrate materials and epitaxy (pages 464–471)

      Dr. Gerhard Packeiser

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021005

      High-speed-, and optical devices are two applications of compound semiconductors. The methods used in the production of GaAs (and other III-V semiconductors) including MBE and MOCVD, are discussed along with materials characterization and present and future applications.

    4. High-Tc Superconductors (pages 473–477)

      Dr. Günther Bogner and Dr. Hans E. Hoenig

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021006

      Applications-oriented R & D in ceramic high-Tc superconductors is pursued at Siemens in close cooperation with workers at Hoechst (amongst others). Recent success, e.g. with a coplanar stripline resonator for 6.52 GHz, and high-quality thin-films, are described and production and processing methods are reviewed.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Polypyrrole-dodecylsulfate: 2 × 104 cycles with an organic electrochromic material in a Basic Medium (pages 480–482)

      Prof. Marco-A. De Paoli, Dr. Stefania Panero, Dr. Stefano Paserini and Dr. B. Scrosati

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021007

      The remarkable stability of the electrochromic title compound in aqueous base (KOH) has been demonstrated over 2 · 104 charge/dischage cycles. Conducting polymer films containing inorganic anions usually show high sensitivity to water, losing activity rapidly, but the dodecylsulfate surfactant anion improves the stability to the extent that efficient cycling is possible even in basis media.

    2. Direct imaging of Pd561(phen)38±2On and Au55(PPh3)12Cl6 clusters using scanning tunneling microscopy (pages 482–484)

      Harald A. Wierenga, Luc Soethout, Jan W. Gerritsen, Bart E. C. van de Leemput, Prof. Herman van Kempen and Prof. Günther Schmid

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021008

      The first images of isolated full-shell ligand-stabilized clusters have been obtained using STM (see figure). The clusters are ideal model systems for studying the relationship between cluster size and electronic properties as well as having applications in catalysts and filters.

    3. Solid-state 13C-NMR on oriented films of liquid-crystalline polymers (pages 484–487)

      Ulrich Wiesner, Klaus Schmidt-Rohr, Dr. Christine Boeffel, Ute Pawelzik and Prof. Hans Wolfgang Spiess

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021009

      Optically transparent films of a liquid crystalline (LC) polymer with azobenzene mesogens, which has recently been exploited for reversible holographic information storage, have been studied using solid-state NMR. The extent to which optically switching the dye with laser light affects the alignment of the LC matrix, a factor which could influence the performance of the materials in storage applications, is examined.

    4. Computing the structure of pillared Clays (pages 487–490)

      Julian D. Gale, Prof. Anthony K. Cheetham, Dr. Robert A. Jackson, Prof. C. Richard A. Callow and John M. Thomas

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021010

      The behavior of an organic cation in a pillared clay has been successfully simulated taking into account both long-range electrostatic interact-ions and short-range interactions between cation guests and host lattice. Anilinium cation pillars in vermiculite (a high charge density smectite) is the system studied and the simulations (e.g. see figure) compare favorably with the experimental 3D crystal structure.

    5. Synthesis and properties of carboxy-functionalized poly(3-alkylthienylenes) (pages 490–494)

      Dr. Peter Bäuerle, Kai-Uwe Gaudl, Frank Würthner, Dr. N. Serdar Sariciftci, Prof. Michael Mehring, Dr. Helmut Neugebauer, Dr. Chuanjian Zhong and Dr. Karl Doblhofer

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021011

      The synthesis of a new type of, and doping mechanism in, “self exchange” or “self-doping” conducting polymers based on 3-(ω-carboxyalkyl)thiophenes (with n = 4-14) is examined (see figure). The properties of the polymers are different to that of those based on the corresponding sulphonic acids due to the lower acidity of the carboxylic acid function.

  5. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Molecular materials II Part B. Molecular electronics? (pages 495–497)

      Dr. Joel S. Miller

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021012

      In the second part of this three-part article the problems which have to be overcome in order to make use of molecular electronics e.g. quantum fluctuations, switching errors, heat dissipation and limited input/output possibilities are examined.

    2. Laser-induced polymerization of siloxanes without photoinitiators (pages 497–498)

      Dr. Wolfgang Roth, Dr. Hans-J. Henkel, Klaus W. Hoffmann and Dr. Helmut Markert

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021013

      High-purity polymers even os the chemically inert dimethylsiloxane (see figure) can be produced by initiating the polymerization of the monomers using laser light rather than chemical initiators which are usually one of the main sources of impurities in the polymers. Polysiloxanes are used in electronics due to their excellent thermal and dielectric properties.

  6. Conference Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Ceramic powder processing in san diego (pages 499–501)

      Joachim Opitz

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021014

      Joachim Optiz of Philips reports on a meeting on ceramic powders in the USA and Marcell Peuckert of Hoechst describes activities at a recent meeting on high-Tc superconductors in southern Germany.

    2. HTSC in garmisch-partenkirchen (pages 501–502)

      Dr. Marcell Peuckert

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021015

  7. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Materials forum (pages 503–504)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900021016

  8. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews

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