Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

April 1990

Volume 2, Issue 4

Pages fmi–fmi, 165–210

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020401

  2. Editorial Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
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      Materials science and engineering for the 1990's (pages 165–166)

      Prof. Merton C. Flemings

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020402

      Merton Flemings, head of materials science and engineering at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology recently co-chaired a study of American performance in materials science and summarizes here the salient points of the report. Robert Cahn of Cambridge University, UK, gives his opinion in this issue's book review section.

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Advanced materials for reversible optical storage (pages 166–173)

      Dr. Edward M. Engler

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020403

      The development of semiconductor lasers and the application of materials such as garnets as the recording media have led to fast progress in optical storage technology. The ability of the new methods (for mode of information storage see figure) to compete with magnetic storage are discussed, new materials are assessed, and techniques such as direct overwrite through field or laser modulation are described.

    2. Energetic Materials (pages 174–179)

      Dr. Sury Iyer and Dr. Norman Slagg

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020404

      Metastable molecues possessing high reactivity can be employed as explosives, propellants, and pyrotechnics. The properties, sensitivities and kinetics of energetic materials used as nitroaromatics and nitramines, which are in both military and civilian use, are discussed and the theory of detonation described.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Charting cation migration in a nickel exchanged zeolitic catalyst: An in situ rietveld X-ray study (pages 181–183)

      Prof. John W. Couves, Dr. Richard H. Jones, Prof. John M. Thomas and Barnaby J. Smith

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020405

      X-ray diffractograms of an active zeolite catalyst (see figure) can yield information concerning the distribution of metal cations within the framework of the catalyst. When thse measurements are carried out during catalysis, the migration of the ions can be followed and the occupation of various sites examined.

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    2. Ultrasmall semiconductor particles sandwiched between surfactant headgroups in langmuir-blodgett films (pages 183–185)

      Dr. Shuqian Xu, Dr. Xiao Kang Zhao and Prof. Janos H. Fendler

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020406

      The incorporation of performed CdS semiconductor particles between surfactants in LB-films is reported. The sandwich structures are potentially of great technical importance and are characterized by absorption spectroscopy, electron diffraction and scanning tunneling microscopy.

    3. Synthesis and properties of viologen functionalized poly(3-alkylthienylenes) (pages 185–188)

      Dr. Peter Bäuerle and Kai-Uwe Gaudl

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020407

      Viologen functionalized conducting polymers synthesized from the substituted monomers whon in the figure are interesting materials with possible applications in redox or electrocatalysis, sensors, and electrochromic devices. Monomers and polymers with various numbers of methylene groups separating the thiophene units and the redoxactive viologen moieties have been synthesized and characterized.

  5. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Biomaterials highlights V. Percutaneous amputation stump extensions (pages 189–191)

      Prof. Günther Heimke

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020408

      Biomaterials highlights V. The joining of the stump of an amputated limb to the man-made extension presents a number of medical, mechanical and materials problems not least of which is how the extension should penetrate the skin without causing infection.

    2. Chemically modified metal surfaces—a new class of composite materials (pages 191–195)

      Dr. Martin Stratmann

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020409

      Composites in which the different constituents are chemically bonded to one another as opposed to simply mixed could have a great impact on adhesion, corrosion and reinforcement technologies. The modification of an active metal surfaces using organic molecules prior to the attachment of polymers is described.

    3. Diamond thin film technology I. Diamond deposition (pages 195–199)

      Dr. Peter K. Bachmann

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020410

      Diamond thin film technology I. In the first article of a regular series Peter Bachmann of the Philips Research Labs in Aachen, FRG, describes the different methods used to deposit diamond in films (see figure). Diamond in this form has many applications e.g. as an abrasive material, in lithography masks, microwave windows, in heat sinks, and in LEDs to name just a few.

  6. Conference Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. The FEMS in Aachen (page 200)

      Sir Geoffrey Ford

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020411

      Sir Geoffrey Ford and Ford and Peter Gregory report on the Federation of European Materials Societies and their activities at a recent conference in northern Germany, while Josef Friedrich reveals what a shocking time he had at a meeting on optically active materials in San Jose last October.

    2. European materials in aachen (pages 201–202)

      Dr. Peter Gregory

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020412

    3. Unconventional optically active solids in san jose (pages 203–204)

      Prof. Josef Friedrich

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020413

  7. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Materials Forum (pages 204–205)

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020414

  8. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Editorial Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews

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