Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

June/July 1990

Volume 2, Issue 6-7

Pages fmi–fmi, 277–335

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020601

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Materials research in France (page 277)

      Prof. Francis Garnier

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020602

      Francis Garnier of the CNRS in Thiais, France, introduces this special issue of ADVANCED MATERIALS which has a a theme “Materials Science in France”. Professor Garnier, who coordinated many of the articles for this edition starts the ball rolling with a general view of the particular strengths of French research. Individuals wishing to perform a similar role for a future issue, concentrating on another country or even topic, should contact the Editors as soon as possible to discuss their ideas.

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Polymers with Ionic Conductivity (pages 278–286)

      Prof. Michel Armand

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020603

      A solvation-desolvation mechanism (see figure) is responsible for ionic conductivity in polymers such as polyethylene oxide. The solvating sites are covalently linked through flexible bonds meaning that a net displacement of the ligand with the ions over macroscopic distances is forbidden, a situation intermediate between liquids and solids. Sensors, batteries, and displays are among the applications of these polymeric electrolytes.

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    2. Organic Semiconductors for new electronic devices (pages 287–292)

      Dr. Gilles Horowitz

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020604

      Field effect transistors, schottky diodes, and solar cells are among the applications of organic semiconductors now being developed. Questions concerning charge generation and transport as well as doping mechanisms in these materials, which include polyacetylenes, polythiophenes and metallophthalocyanines are reviewed, and future directions in both experimental and theoretical work discussed.

    3. Silica surface sensitization and chemical sensors (pages 293–298)

      Prof. Paul Clechet and Dr. Nicole Jaffrezic-Renault

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020605

      Covalently bounded self-assembled long-chgain monolayers can be used to modify the silica insulator of CHEMPFET sensors (see figure). The selectivity of the sensor can be modified by appropriate selection of the functional groups on the bonded molecules. Silanization, using monofunctional silanes, provides the basis of a method for such modification and can be used to produce ionspecific sensors with short response times ( < 2s) and long lifetimes.

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    4. Layered Lead Cuprates: Promising high- Tc superconductors (pages 299–304)

      Prof. B. Raveau, Dr. C. Michel, Dr. M. Hervieu, Dr. D. Groult and Dr. J. Provost

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020606

      The PvIV/PbII redox couple, a feature of the layered lead cupratexs, is important in the creation of new superconductors but also complicates the crystal chemistry. Structural issues in these promising materials, which have a Tc ranging from 40 to 100 K, and the dramatic effects of different synthetic and processing methods on oxygen inhomogeneity in the crystals and therefore on their superconducting properties are examined.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Superconducting hollow and solid fibers and thin films of YBa2Cu3OX from a polymeric precursor (pages 305–309)

      Prof. James C. W. Chien, Dr. Ben Ming Gong, Dr. Yingsong Yang, Dr. Ivan Cabrera, Jochem Effing and Prof. Helmut Ringsdorf

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020607

      Superconducting hollow fibers of YBa2Cu3Ox (see figure) can be prepared via the supramolecular organization of polymer-metal complexes. Solid fibers and oriented thin films have also been prepared. The ability to form the superconducting material into different shapes can provide a basis for innovative applications, for instance, the hollow fibers may be used as high-Tc superconducting lenses.

    2. Phase diagrams of monolayers of the long chain fatty acids (pages 309–311)

      Dr. Anna M. Bibo and Dr. Ian R. Peterson

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020608

      The characteristics of langmuir-blodgett (LB) films depend on the phase of the water-surface monolayer from which they have been depoisted. A range of long-chain fatty acids have been studied and it is reported, for example, that there are a multiplicity of phases in these materials, a finding which is not in accord with currently held views.

    3. Highly polarizable zwitter-ions for nonlinear optics: Synthesis, structure and properties of phenoxide-pyridinium derivatives (pages 311–313)

      Gérard Bacquet, Dr. Pierre Bassoul, Dr. Catherine Combellas, Prof. Jacques Simon, Dr. André Thiébault and Prof. Francois Tournilhac

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020609

      High hyperpolarizabilities can be obtained in nonlinear optical materials through the incorporation of electron donor and acceptor moieties. This communication reports a convenient synthetic route (see figure) to materials containing both phenoxide and pyridinium units which are among the most favorbale gropus for this purpose. The hyperpolarizabilities are examnined and the crystal structure of 1 a is discussed.

  5. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Self-propagating high-temperature synthesis (pages 314–316)

      Prof. Robert W. Cahn

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020610

    2. Inorganic materials III. Glass-ceramic bonds (pages 318–321)

      Graham Partridge

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020612

    3. Organic superconductors (pages 321–324)

      Dr. Denis Jérome

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020613

  6. Conference Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Cu alloys in Anaheim (pages 324–325)

      Dr. Wolfgang Kaysser

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020614

    2. Macromolecules in Freiburg (pages 325–328)

      Dr. Gerhard Maier

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020615

  7. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Materials Forum (pages 328–329)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020616

  8. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews

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