Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

September 1990

Volume 2, Issue 9

Pages fmi–fmi, 397–442

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book & Video Reviews
    9. Book & Video Review
    10. Book & Video Reviews
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020901

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book & Video Reviews
    9. Book & Video Review
    10. Book & Video Reviews
    1. Too many peas in the pod? (page 397)

      Dr. Peter Gregory

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020902

      This issue contains much information concerning journals and books in materials science (see “Materials Forum” and “Book Reviews”). The everrising flood of publications puts readers, subscribers and librarians under increasing pressure. The pros and cons of the fast development of publications are discussed.

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book & Video Reviews
    9. Book & Video Review
    10. Book & Video Reviews
    1. Ceramics from organometallic polymers (pages 398–404)

      Dr. Marcell Peuckert, Dr. Tilo Vaahs and Martin Brück

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020903

      Non-oxide advanced ceramics, for example SiC, Si3N4, AlN, BN or TiN can be produced from polymeric precursors. The processing advantages which the inorganic polymers provide (e.g. solubility and fusibility) open up a vast array of novel applications for the materials such as ceramic coatings, binders, impregnations and spun fibers, uses which are impossible by powder processing.

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    2. Chemical modification of polymeric materials by physiologically active substances (pages 405–411)

      Prof. Lev I. Valuev and Prof. Nikolai A. Platé

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020904

      Physiologically active molecules, when incorporated into polymers through homo- or copolymerization, result in biomedical materials with applications based on their physico-chemical, mechanical and biochemical properties. The authors provide an overview of the Russian contributions to the field which include hemocompatible polymers, biospecific hemosorbants for the removal of toxins from the blood stream, and polymeric medications.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book & Video Reviews
    9. Book & Video Review
    10. Book & Video Reviews
    1. Synthesis of molecular organometallic composites: Polymerization of vinylferrocene in a porous polymer matrix (pages 412–414)

      Prof. Reza Arshady, Prof. Benedetto Corain, Dr. Silvano Lora, Prof. Giancarlo Palma, Prof. Umberto Russo, Dr. Felix Okon Sam and Dr. Marco Zecca

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020905

      Polymer-organometallic composites are potentially suitable for catalyst development. 3.8% Fe has been incorporated into a composite (see figure) by the copolymarization of vinyl ferrocene, dimethylacrylamide and methylene bisacrylamide within a preformed porous polymeric matrix, a metal incorporation significantly higher than that reported for materials obtained by graft polymerization.

    2. Superstructures and band gaps of bismuth tantalum oxide solid solutions (pages 414–420)

      Dr. Wuzong Zhou

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020906

      The search for superconductors, catalysts, and semiconductors can be facilitated by an understanding of the relationship between the structure of a material and its properties. In this study, high-resolution electron microscopy (HREM) is used to examine the structures of solid solutions of BiTaO materials including Aurivillius phases, and it is shown that the band gaps of the materials depend on the superstructure rather than on composition.

    3. Triphenyl methane dyes as sensor materials for solvent detection with surface-acoustic-wave devices (pages 420–422)

      Prof. Franz L. Dickert, Gerhard Bertlein, Dr. Gert Mages and Wolf-E. Bulst

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020907

      Highly-colored phthalide carbenium ions (see figure) embedded in a matrix of phenols can form the basis of solventsensing devices able to detect a variety of solvents in concentrations down to a few ppm. Solvent absorption disturbs hydrogen bonding producing a less favorable environment for the cations, the changing concentration of which can be monitored using optical absorption, or SAW-devices.

  5. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book & Video Reviews
    9. Book & Video Review
    10. Book & Video Reviews
    1. Plasma processing of surfaces (pages 424–426)

      Dr. Wolfgang Möhl

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020908

      Plasma techniques are employed in microlithography and in other surface modification methods. The increasing need for sources of “clean” plasma, uncontaminated with metal, has led to the development of new technology which outperforms the traditional Kaufman-type source. The techniques are compared and some of the possible applications examined.

    2. Surface anlysis IV. Moving single atoms and breaking chemical bonds (pages 428–429)

      Dr. Jürgen P. Rabe

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020909

      Workers at IBM have recently demonstrated the manipulation of single atoms, using an STM to write their company;s name in letters 5 nm high, assembled from exnon atoms. The method used is described and trends in this area examined.

  6. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book & Video Reviews
    9. Book & Video Review
    10. Book & Video Reviews
    1. Materials Forum (pages 429–432)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19900020910

  7. Book & Video Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book & Video Reviews
    9. Book & Video Review
    10. Book & Video Reviews
  8. Book & Video Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book & Video Reviews
    9. Book & Video Review
    10. Book & Video Reviews
  9. Book & Video Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book & Video Reviews
    9. Book & Video Review
    10. Book & Video Reviews

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