Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

October 1991

Volume 3, Issue 10

Pages fmi–fmi, 470–522

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Essay
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Research News
    9. Autumn Book Reviews
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031001

  2. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Essay
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Research News
    9. Autumn Book Reviews
    1. Crisis or change? (pages 470–471)

      Dr. Kurt Paulus

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031002

      „Publishing in Materials Science”, one of the main themes of this issue, which includes increased coverage of publishers' recent efforts in materials science, is introduced by Kurt Paulus, publishing director of the Institute of Physics. He discusses the effects of the information explosion both on publishing practice and on the ability of libraries to keep pace with new publications and the changing literature requirements of the research community.

  3. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Essay
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Research News
    9. Autumn Book Reviews
    1. Togetherness (pages 472–473)

      Prof. Robert Cahn

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031003

      Essay: International and inter-lab cooperation in materials science is examined based on a study of the author affiliations on journal articles and MRS symposium papers. Some papers in physics are attributed to more than 200 authors. The reasons behind these development including the possible influence of central European funding, are discussed.

  4. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Essay
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Research News
    9. Autumn Book Reviews
    1. Synthetic routes to high surface area non-oxide materials (pages 474–485)

      Richard W. Chorley and Dr. Peter W. Lednor

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031004

      Review: Non-oxide ceramic compositions, such as carbides, nitrides, borides, and sulfides, in their compacted forms show outstanding mechanical strength and resistance to wear. These properties depend a defect-free microstructure which can best be obtained through the use of homogeneous, high surface area powdered starting materials. The methods of preparing such powders, and also their use in other applications, such as catalysis, are reviewed.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Essay
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Research News
    9. Autumn Book Reviews
    1. Structural characterization and properties of a new tetrathiafulvalene-based cage molecule derived from an azacrown (pages 486–488)

      Tine Jørgensen, Prof. Jan Becher, Thomas Kruse Hansen, Kim Christiansen, Prof. Peter Roepstorff, Prof. Sine Larsen and Anne Nygaard

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031005

      Communication: A cage molecule combining a precursor of the electroactive tetrathiafulvalene (TTF) unit with a macrocycle capable of complexing transition metals (see Figure) is reported. The preparation of this compound and the TTF-based compound whose cavity is too small for complexing the metal are reported.

    2. Preparation of unleaded Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10 (pages 488–491)

      Dr. Peter Majewsky, Dr. Bernhard Hettich, Dr. Klaus Schulze and Prof. Günter Petzow

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031006

      Communication: The 2223 single-phase region in the Bi2O3–SrO-CaO-CuO system has been defined, enabling the preparation of pure (> 90%), unleaded Bi2Sr2Ca2Cu3O10. The bismuth content of the superconductor, which is better suited for research than the leaded variety, is found to be significantly higher (at 2.5) than expected from the exact stoichiometry. The preparation conditions and the phase diagram are discussed.

    3. Absorption spectra of charged oligo (phenylenevinylene)s: On the detection of polaronic and bipolaronic states (pages 492–493)

      Dr. Rainer Schenk, Heike Gregorius and Prof. Klaus Müllen

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031007

      Communication: The effective conjugation length of poly(phenylenevinylene) an important conducting polymer, can be estimated by extrapolation of the results of UV/VIS/NIR studies of the radical anions and dianions of the soluble, well-characterized oligo(phenylenevinylene)s shown in the figure. This information, in turn, is usefull in describing the mechanism of conduction in the polymer.

    4. Conformation and optical absorption properties of thiophene oligomers: 13C-NMR, UV, and MMP2 calculations of Di- and tetramethyl-quaterthiophenes (pages 494–496)

      Dr. Giovanna Barbarella, Massimo Zambianchi and Prof. Alessandro Bongini

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031008

      Communication: A combined calculational and experimental study of methylated oligothiophenes allows the effects of different substitution patterns on the geometry, the inter-ring twist, and the conformational and optical properties of the oligomers, which have potential applications in molecular electronics and can be polymerized to polythiophenes, to be examined.

    5. Towards a planar, double-stranded polymer (pages 497–499)

      Dr. Adelheid Godt and Dr. Arnulf-Dieter Schluter

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031009

      Communication: Unsaturated ladder polymers consisting of a perfect sequence of all-carbon six-membered rings (polycatafusenes) are predicted to exhibit intrinsic electrical conductivity and high optical nonlinearity. One step towards this goal, the chemically induced unfolding of a coiled ladder polymer (see Figure), where the geometries of the carbons marked “B” regulates the overall structure, is reported.

  6. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Essay
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Research News
    9. Autumn Book Reviews
    1. Materials Forum (pages 499–503)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031010

  7. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Essay
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Research News
    9. Autumn Book Reviews
    1. Aerogels (pages 504–506)

      Prof. Jochen Fricke and Andreas Emmerling

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031011

      Research News: Recently listed amongst the top ten scientific and technological developments, aerogels have found applications as traps for relativistic particles, in fire protection and in thermal insulation or acoustic impedance. The materials, which contain more air than gel, their synthesis, and other potential applications are described.

    2. Talking point. Intrinsically conducting polymers: A critical stage in research strategy? (pages 507–509)

      Dr. Bernhard Wessling

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031012

      Research News/Talking Point: Is the euphoria some attach to the prospects for conducting polymers misguided? Or is it the case that the wrong approach has been adopted for the research strategy? These two questions are addressed as the first commercially available intrinsically conducting polymer blend reaches the market.

    3. Screw dislocations: The key to high critical currents in YBa2Cu3O7? (pages 509–511)

      Dr. Herbert Jaeger

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031013

      Research News: Defects in high-Tc superconductors recently observed with the aid of scanning tunneling microscopy could hold the key to increased critical current densities, a crucial requirement for power applications. The observation, by teams from the Los Alamos National Laboratory, and IBM Zurich, and origin of the defects (see Figure) are discussed.

    4. Talking Point. Is it as simple as ABC?—a biocompatibility consensus (pages 511–514)

      Dr. Julian H. Braybrook

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910031014

      Research News/Talking Point: The need for standardization in the analysis of the properties of materials intended for use in biomedical applications is the subject of this discussion type article. The various materials and characterization methods are summarized and the status of European and global efforts at coordinating activities examined.

  8. Autumn Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Essay
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Articles
    8. Research News
    9. Autumn Book Reviews

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