Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

February 1991

Volume 3, Issue 2

Pages fmi–fmi, 85–114

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Materials Forum
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030201

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Materials Forum
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    1. The Advanced Photon Source (pages 85–86)

      Prof. Stephen M. Durbin

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030202

      Essay: Synchrotron X-ray sources are opening up new avenues of research in materials science. Applications include X-ray diffraction of ever-smaller samples, X-ray fluorescence microscopy, and X-ray tomography, a technique which provides detailed information on the internal structure of materials. The potential contribution of the Advanced Photon Soruce (APS) being built at the Argonne National Laboratory in the USA which should be operational in 1995, and modes of access to the facility are described.

  3. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Materials Forum
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    1. Perfluorochemicals: Blood substitutes and beyond (pages 87–93)

      Kenneth C. Lowe

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030203

      Review: Biomedical applications of perfluorinated compounds, which are either dense white powders or colorless, odorless liquids, are based on their gas transport capabilities and include resuscitation fluids, microcirculatory support in inschaemic tissues, tumor sensitizers, contrast agents, and the preservation of organs or limbs prior to transplantation. The various formulations, which also contain surfactants, are described with reference to their biocompatibility and modes of use.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Materials Forum
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    1. Mesophase formed by diabolo-like molecules (pages 94–96)

      Dr. Jacques Malthête and Dr. Anne-Marie Levelut

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030204

      Communciation: Mesogenic disc-like compounds possessing a high permanent electric dipole moment are of interest as they offer the possibility of orientating columnar mesophases. The structure (schematically shown in the figure) which is similar to the well-known toy “Diabolo”, and phase behavior of only the second example of such a compound are described.

      • equation image
    2. A novel Langmuir–Blodgett film of a dibenzylideneacetone–Pd(0) complex and its use for preparation of catalytically active substrates (pages 96–100)

      Dr. Bernd Tieke, Dr. Sheik A. Zahir and Dr. Hans-J. Mathieu

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030205

      Communication: The precise control of the amount of catalytic palladium deposited on a substrate as an ultrathin film can be achieved if the films are prepared using the Langmuir–Blodgett technique. The high solubility of the dibenzylideneacetone derivative shown in the figure facilitates this approach, producing films stable at room temperature but which decompose depositing metallic palladium at the melting point of the complex, 165°C.

    3. Liquid crystal polymers containing macroheterocyclic ligands 6. synthesis of mesomorphic polymers containing crown ethers by cationic cyclopolymerization and cyclocopolymerization of 1,2-bis(2-ethenyloxyethoxy)benzene derivatives containing mesogenic side groups (pages 101–104)

      Dr. Randall Rodenhouse and Prof. Dr. Virgil Percec

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030206

      Communication: Side-chain LCPs containing both a crown ether and a mesogenic group in each structural unit of the polymer are reported based on the monomer shown in the figure. Liquid crystals containing macroheterocyclic ligands are of interest since they provide a novel approach to self-assembled systems which combine selective recognition with external regulation.

    4. Conducting polymer composites of poly(N-methylpyrrole) and poly(bisphenol-A-carbonate) (pages 104–106)

      Uwe Geißler, Prof. Manfred L. Hallensleben and Prof. Levent Toppare

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030207

      Communication: The role of hydrogen bonding in the formation of homogeneous blends of conducting (polypyrrole) and insulating (poly(bisphenol-A-carbonate)) polymers is examined. The blends exhibit improved mechanical properties over the brittle pure conducting polymers and it has been suggested that the hydrogen bonding arises from the interaction of carbonyl groups in the insulating polymer and NH groups in the polypyrrole. To test this hypothesis, N-methylpyrrole, which is incapable of hydrogen bonding, is used in the blends and the resulting materials studied.

  5. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Materials Forum
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    1. Materials Forum (page 106)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030208

  6. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Materials Forum
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    1. Chemical valves and gel actuators (pages 107–108)

      Prof. Yoshihito Osada

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030209

      Research News: Chemomechanical systems, based on porous polymers which undergo shape change or develop contractile forces in response to an external stimulus are attracting much interest as adjustable size-selective permeation membranes for separating solute mixtures with different molecular size, in controlled drug release, or in actuators such as the gel looper shown in the figure which can move at a speed of 15 mm/min.

      • equation image
    2. Biomaterials highlights VIII. Percutaneous implants (pages 108–110)

      Prof. Günther Heimke

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030210

      Research News/Biomaterials Highlights VIII: Increase of the functional life of biomedical implants which extend through the skin or other body tissues, such as dental implants, and catheters, can be achieved by careful selection of materials and bioengineering approaches. Recent developments are discussed.

    3. Molecular materials III Molecular materials with increased superconducting and ferromagnetic critical temperatures (pages 110–112)

      Dr. Joel S. Miller

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030211

      Research News/Molecular Materials III: Recent developments in the molecular approach to superconductivity, for example the work of Williams et al. in increasing the Tc to 12.8 K, and new work in the field of molecular ferromagnets, where the Tc has also been significantly increased are described.

    4. Atomic sites of a bare surface modified with the tunneling microscope (pages 112–113)

      Dr. Harald Fuchs and Dr. Thomas Schimmel

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030212

      Research News: The reproducible direct labeling of atomic sites on a semiconductor surface at room temperature and under ambient conditions has recently been reported for the first time. The STM method used, which results in an increase in the apparent height of the atomic positions but not in the formation of other defects such as dislocations, could have significant technological relevance, for example for the storage of digital information on the atomic scale.

  7. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Materials Forum
    7. Research News
    8. Conference Report
    1. Tunneling microscopy in Baltimore (pages 113–114)

      Dr. Jürgen P. Rabe

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030213

      Conference Report: Jürgen Rabe reprots on his recent visit to a meeting on scanning tunneling microscopy in the USA.

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