Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

May 1991

Volume 3, Issue 5

Pages fmi–fmi, 223–267

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Report
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030501

  2. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Report
    1. Technical and scientific societies on the upswing (pages 223–224)

      Dr. Peter Paul. Schepp

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030502

      Essay: The role of technical and scientific societies in information transfer, education, and the coordination of research and development efforts is examined with special emphasis on the Deutsche Gesellschaft für Materialkunde (DGM), the German Materials Society. The DGM, which was instrumental in the foundation of the European organization f. e. m. s., the Federation of European Materials Societies, is outlined and its relationship with other European materials societies, for example the European Materials Research Society (E-MRS) is discussed.

    2. DCNQIs—new electron acceptors for charge-transfer complexes and highly conducting radical anion salts (pages 225–236)

      Prof. Siegfried Hünig and Dr. Peter Erk

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030503

      Review: Organic conducting materials show potential for applications in, for example, electrostatic shielding or in pressure sensing. In the past, research aimed at the optimization of the properties of these materials e.g. the charge-transfer (CT) complex tetrathiafulvalene/tetracyanoquinodümine (TTF/TCNQ, see figure) have concentrated mainly on varying the structure of the donor (TTF). Here, in contrast, the recent progress made in the identification, synthesis, and characterization of new acceptors suitable for use in CT complexes, the N,N'-dicyanoquinonediimines (DCNQIs) is reviewed.

    3. Solid-state NMR of Heterogeneous Materials (pages 237–245)

      Priv. Doz. Dr. Bernhard Blümich

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030504

      Review: The phase structure of incopatible polymer, pores in ceramics, and variations in the chemical compositions of composites are examples of the heterogeneous nature of materials. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) now offers several means of investigating these heterogeneities in a non-destructive fashion. The basis and the applications of the various NMR methods involved, for example NMR imaging and solid-state magic angle spinning (MAS) NMR are reviewed.

  3. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Report
    1. Materials Forum (pages 245–255)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030505

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Report
    1. Selective low-temperature chemical vapor deposition of copper from (hexafluoroacetylacetonato)copper(I)trimethylphosphine, (hfa)CuP(Me)3 (pages 246–248)

      Prof. Toivo T. Kodas, H.-K. Shin, Dr. K.-M. Chi, Prof. Mark J. Hampden-Smith, John D. Farr and Dr. Mark Paffett

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030506

      Communication: The deposition of smooth, dense, fine-grained, low resistivity copper films has been achieved at temperatures as low as 150°C from an organometallic precursor. It is suggested that the films (see figure) are formed as the result of thermal disproportionation of the precursor without decomposition of the ligand. Substrate-selective deposition at rates of over 1000 Åμmin is demonstrated.

    2. Highly effective surfactants with low hemolytic activity (pages 249–251)

      Prof. Jean G. Riess, Dr. Simonne Pace and Dr. Leila Zarif

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030507

      Communication: Fluorochemicals show potential as highly surface-active but non-hemolyzing surfactants, an important combination of properties for biomedical applications such as blood substitutes and contrast agents. Hydrocarbon-based surfactants suffer from the disadvantage that as the length of the hydrocarbon chain (and therefore surface activity) increases, cell-destruction (hemolysis) also increases. The fluorinated srufactants, however, exhibit the opposite effect, an increase in chain length and surface activity leading to reduced hemolysis.

    3. Trisubstituted decacyclene derivatives: Bridging the gap between the carbonaceous mesophase and discotic liquid crystals (pages 251–254)

      Prof. Ehud Keinan, Dr. Sandeep Kumar, Dr. Reuven Moshenberg, Rodolfo Ghirlando and Dr. Ellen J. Wachtel

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030508

      Communication: Discotic mesogens with C3 symmetry (see figure) are shown to form the basis of a chemically stable low-temperature model for the carbonaceous mesophase, a key intermediate in the production of coke and graphite via the carbonization of organic precursors. The synthesis and properties are reported.

  5. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Report
    1. Paramagnetic nematic liquid crystals (pages 256–257)

      Dr. Mercedes Marcos and Dr. José-Luis Serrano

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030509

      Research News: Orientation of nematic liquid crystals (LCs) in a magnetic field can be achieved if a paramagnetic unit is incorporated into the system. Recently vanadyl and copper based paramagnetic LCs have been developed which show promise in the magnetic characterization of LCs. The paramagnetic complexes can be added to the sample of interest and the whole studied using NMR or ESR.

    2. Sol–gel processes (pages 258–259)

      Dr. Hans Reuter

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030510

      Research News: Ceramic materials for applications in electronics, solar-energy conversion, optics, etc. can be synthesized using the sol–gel process. In the first part of a two-part article the basic concepts of the process, its requirements, and potential, including ceramic precursors, reaction mechanisms and the historical development are described.

    3. Metal injection molding: Shaping sintered metal parts (pages 260–262)

      Prof. Walter Michaeli and Raffael Bielzer

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030511

      Reserch News: Rapid production of high-tolerance metal parts with complex shapes through combining the sintering process with injection molding, a technique usually used for plastics, is described. Injection of a mixture of metal powder and binder is followed by removal of the binder (right) and then sintering to the final density (left).

    4. Molecular materials IV. Buckminsterfullerene—a molecular material for the future? (pages 262–265)

      Dr. Joel S. Miller

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030512

      Research News/Molecular Materials IV: Superconducting C60 with the highest known Tc for molecular superconductors was reported recently by workers from AT&T. Recent work on the newest form of elemental carbon is discussed from a materials point of view.

  6. Conference Report

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Report
    1. Polymers in Hamburg (pages 266–267)

      Prof. H. Gerhard Zachmann

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19910030513

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