Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

January 1992

Volume 4, Issue 1

Pages fmi–fmi, 8–58

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Research News
    6. Guide to Author
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040101

  2. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Research News
    6. Guide to Author
    1. The southampton/UCL interdisciplinary optoelectronics research centre (pages 8–10)

      Prof. William A. Gambling

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040102

      Optical methods of data transfer and processing (optoelectronics) using lasers and optical waveguides offer a great speed advantage over puprely electronic processing. The history of the development of optoelectronics thchnology, its applications both today and tomorrow, and an Interdisciplinary Research Centre in the South of England devoted to its study and application are described by the centre's Director.

    2. Intrazeolite Topotaxy (pages 11–22)

      Prof. Geoffrey A. Ozin and Prof. Saim Özkar

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040103

      The self-assembly of semiconductor quantum dots or wires within the cavity of a zeolite or molecular-sieve host to form qunatum supralattices has great potential in the development and study of organized systems with value in, for example, quantum electronics, nonlinear optics, optical data storage, and chemoselective sening. The organization of inorganic, organometallic, and metal-carbonyl moieties on the internal surfaces of the hosts (e.g. see figure) is thebasis of the work and the chemsitry and its applications are reviewed.

    3. Electrosynthesized thin films of group II–VI compound semiconductors, alloys and superstructures (pages 23–29)

      Prof. Krishnan Rajeshwar

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040104

      II-IV compound semiconductors such as CdTe and Hg1–x CdxTe are important in a wide range of optoelectronics applications ranging from solar cells and infrared detectors to „smart” goggles. An alternative to the cost-intensive vacuum-based production techniques is electrodeposition which allows large-area deposition, close control of the deposition conditions, and obviates the need for toxic, organometallic precursors. The advantages and disadvantages of the method are discussed.

  3. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Research News
    6. Guide to Author
    1. The first example of a tridentate azamacrocyclic metallomesogen (pages 30–33)

      Dr. Günter Lattermann, Steven Schmidt, Ralf Kleppinger and Prof. Joachim Heinz Wendorff

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040105

      The introduction of a metal into a mesogenic molecule can result in a complex with interesting electrical and magnetic properties. By reacting the non-mesogenic cyclic amine shown in the figure with Ni(NO3)2 · 6H2O in absolute THF the first member of a new class of columnar liquid-crystalline metal complexes with three nitrogen atoms as donor groups has been prepared.

    2. Crystal structure and electrical properties of κ-((S,S)-DMBEDT–TTF)2ClO4 (pages 33–35)

      Dr. John S. Zambounis, Dr. Carl W. Mayer, Kurt Hauenstein, Dr. Bruno Hilti, Dr. Walther Hofherr, Jurgen Pfeiffer, Markus Bürkle and Grety Rihs

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040106

      The existence of superconductivity in chiral molecular systems is suggested by studies of the title compound. The work, which is an important extension of studies of recently organic superconductors based on unsymmetrical molecules, shows that a sudden, but incomplete loss of resistivity (by a factor of 500) takes place at 3 K and 5 kbar. Both this behavior and the crystal-packing motif suggest that the transition is of a superconducting nature.

    3. Realization of a blue-light-emitting device using poly(p-phenylene) (pages 36–37)

      Gabriele Grem, Günther Leditzky, Dr. Bruno Ullrich and Dr. Günther Leising

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040107

      Blue light emission from poly(p-phenylene), PPP, at room temperature is reported. Thin films of the polymer have been incorporated into an electroluminescent device (see figure) which constitutes the first polymer-based blue-light-emitting diode (LED), a significant step towards, for example, the development of full-color LED computer screens. The polymer LED has advantages of stability over its low-molecular-weight anologues and ease of fabrication over inorganic semiconductor-based devices.

    4. The mesomorphism of some diamides of alkyl-substituted-1,3-Diaminobenzene (pages 37–41)

      Dr. Jacques Malehete, Dr. Anne-Marie Levelut and Dr. Lionel Liebert

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040108

      The mesophases of several oddly shaped mesogenic diamides of 1,3-diaminobenzene, substituted with three methyl groups in positions 2,4,6 or by a methyl and a tert-butyl group in positions 2,5 have been studied by X-ray diffraction. Limello-columnar and uncommon nematic mesomorphic ordering have been observed and the role of hydrogen bonding in the phase behavior investigated.

    5. Precursor compounds for organic metals and nonlinear optical devices from carbohydratederived hydroxymethylfurfuraldehyde:[1, 2] Furanoid electron donors and push/pull substituted compounds (pages 41–44)

      Ulrich Schöberl, Dr. Josef Salbeck and Prof. Jörg Daub

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040109

      Non-food applications of industrially accessible low-molecular-weight carbohydrates are examined. Available from, for example, sucrose, starch, or cellulose, the carbohydrates are shown to form the basis of conducting charge-transfer salts or materials with nonlinear optical properties. The compound shown in the figure, for example, which is based on a furan unit obtainable from glucose, is shown to form a stable charge-transfer salt with TCNQ exhibiting a powder conductivity of 10−2 S/cm at room temperature.

  4. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Research News
    6. Guide to Author
    1. Molecular materials V Part B. Molecular nonlinear optical materials–potential applications (pages 45–48)

      Dr. David F. Eaton, Dr. Gerald R. Meredith and Dr. Joel S. Miller

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040110

      Molecular Materials V B: Second- and third-order nonlinear optical applications require materials with differing structures and properties. In this, the second part of this Research News article, applications such as frequency doubling, optical phase conjugation (four wave mixing), and optical switching are discussed and the various materials requirements examined.

    2. Silicon micro-velcro (pages 48–51)

      Prof. Michael L. Reed, Hongtao Han and Dr. Lee E. Weiss

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040111

      Silicon micromachining technology has been employed to fabricate dense, regular arrays of microstructures which act as mechanical adhesives. Structures such as that shown in the figure have potential applications in the biocompatible bonding of human tissue during surgery, their barb-like nature preventing retraction. A second approach, using mating structures, provides precision self-alligning, room-temperature bonding with potential in the mounting of integrated circuit chips.

    3. Inorganic materials V. Ceramic materials possessing high thermal conductivity (pages 51–54)

      Graham Partridge

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040112

      Inorganic Materials V: Insulating dielectric materials which prossess a high thermal conductivity are required for the dissipation of heat from electrical and electronic equipment. As dissippation requirements increase with the miniaturization of circuitry, materials such as diamond, boron nitride, and silicon carbide are being used to replace alumina. The various materials and their applications are discussed.

    4. Superconducting electronics in the Tl[BOND]Ca[BOND]Ba[BOND]Cu[BOND]O System (pages 55–57)

      Dr. Jon S. Martens and Dr. David S. Ginley

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040113

      The high-Tc superconductor (HTS) Tl-Ca-Ba-Cu-O is an attractive material for applications because of its high transition temperature and structural properties. The bassic structural features, methods of film growth, device processing sequences, and some device and microwave circuit applications are discussed, with special attention being paid to active devices based both on Josephson junctions and on controlled flux flow in the non-Josephson domain.

  5. Guide to Author

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Articles
    4. Communications
    5. Research News
    6. Guide to Author
    1. Guide to Authors (page 58)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040114

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