Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

May 1992

Volume 4, Issue 5

Pages fmi–fmi, 328–380

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Talking Point
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040501

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Talking Point
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    1. JESSI—european microelectronics on its way (pages 328–331)

      Dr. Michael Grünewald

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040502

      The Joint European Submicron Silicon (JESSI) project provides Europes with an opportunity to become and remain competetive with the North American and Japanese performance in microelectronics development. Several of Europe's largest electronics companies are involved in the program which has an overall budget for 1992 or over 400 million ECU. The structure, achievements, and aims of the program which has just finished its start-up phase, are presented.

  3. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Talking Point
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Hydrogen in Semiconductors: Crystal growth and device processing (pages 332–340)

      Dr. Stephen Pearton, Dr. Michael Stavola and Prof. James W. Corbett

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040503

      Hydrogen can have undesirable effects on the electrically active dopant profile in the near-surface region of semiconductors and thus influence the switching and transmission characteristics of devices. However, hydrogen is present in virtually every step during the processing of Si and III–V devices, forming passivating complexes with acceptors (bonding configuration, left) and donors (anti-bonding configuration, right). The inplantation, and diffusion of the hydrogen are followed using, for example, SIMS and infrared spectroscopy.

    2. Raman scattering in high- Tc, superconductors (pages 341–346)

      Dr. Christian Thomsen

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040504

      The non-destructive analysis of superconductors is made possible by Raman scattering techniques. A number of fundamental properties can be examined due to the coupling of electronic system of the materials with the phonons which are actually measured in Raman scattering, including the superconducting energy gap and the Fermi velocity. The aspects of materials characterization are reviewed and the insight and which Raman scattering experiments offer into electron-phonon coupling discussed.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Talking Point
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Direct writing of pure rhodium lines by laser induced chemical vapor deposition (pages 347–349)

      Dr. Johannes Messelhäuser, Dr. Edward B. Flint and Prof. Harald Suhr

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040505

      The deposition of thin rhodium lines of use in the electronics industry, for example as chip interconnections, is demonstrated using laser-induced CVD and the rhodium precursor Rh(CO)2hfa (see figure). The deposited line exhibit a conductivity close to that of the bulk metal, and the precursor has a high vapor pressure leading to an attractively low deposition temperature.

    2. Magnetic interaction in an amide containing two separate nitroxyl radicals (pages 349–351)

      Prof. Lothar Dulog and Dr. Wei Wang

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040506

      Organic molecular magnets have been the target of synthetic chemists for sometime. Most nitroxyl radicals are paramagnetic compounds at high temperatures but magnetic susceptibility measurements indicate that a few such radicals exhibit frerromagnetism or ferromagnetic coupling. This paper deals with one such radical, a dinitroxylamide, which contains two unpaired electrons.

    3. Structure–property relationships determining the spontaneous polarization in FLC-polymers (pages 351–354)

      Holger Poths, Prof. Rudolf Zentel, Axel Schönfeld, Dr. Friedrich Kremer and Dr. Klaus Siemensmeyer

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040507

      Ferroelectric liquid crystals (FLCs) have great potential in the future development of high-resolution displays. A key requirements for their application is an understanding of the relationship between the molecular structure of the liquid crystals and their spontaneous polarization (P8) which in turn influences the switching speed of the materials. Here, it is shown that bulky substituents, which hinder rotation about the long axis of the mesogens (see figure) lead to a higher P8.

    4. Conductive polymeric Cu(II) tetrakis(3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenyl) porphyrin as a photosensitizer in a photoelectrochemical Cell (pages 354–357)

      Prof. Tadeusz Malinski, Aleksander Ciszewski, Judith Fish, Eugeniusz Kubaszewski and Prof. Leszek Czuchajowski

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040508

      Light-stimulated electrode processes at semiconductors in contact with electrolytes are attracting attention as they offer a potentially efficient means of converting light into electrical or chemical energy. The title compound, which is an organic p-type semiconductor, has a small band gap and exhibits high durabiity making it an interesting new cathode material for solar-driven electrolysis.

    5. Growth of cubic (100) SrTiO3 thin films by plasma-enhanced chemical vapor deposition using a novel titanium precursor (pages 357–359)

      Dr. Helga Holzschuh and Prof. Harald Suhr

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040509

      Plasma-enhanced CVD has been used, together with a new titanium precursor (see Figure), for the deposition of epiaxed (100) SrTiO3 thin films at a growth temperature of 500 ° C. In technical applications (100) SrTiO3 thin films have been found to be the ideal substrate for the growth “1-2-3-” superconductors due to the perfect lattice match. The new precursor is easy to synthesize handle, and is stable against air and moisture.

    6. Atom-selective imaging of n-conductive crystals of the ordered phase TlSbSe2 by scanning tunneling microscopy (pages 359–363)

      Wolfgang Stocker, Manfred Salk, Dr. Klaus Wacker, Dr. Sergei N. Magonov and Prof. Hans-Joachim Cantow

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040510

      Element-specific visualization of the (001) surface of n-conducting crystals of the ordered phase of TlSbSe2 has been achieved using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The interpretation of the STM images is fully consistent with a refined evaluation of the crystallographic data, and the two types of surfaces within the unit cell are confirmed.

  5. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Talking Point
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Glass-ceramics in biomedical applications (pages 364–367)

      Graham Partridge

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040511

      Inorganic Materials VI Glass ceramics play a crucial role in many surgical procedures ranging from hip replacement to dentistry. The surface morhology, chemical composition, and the structural properties of the materials are of utmost importance when deciding the suitability of the materials for particular applications. The various factors involved are discussed.

  6. Talking Point

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Talking Point
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Fractals in conducting polymers (pages 368–369)

      Dr. Mahmoud Aldissi

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040512

      Talking point Do fractal concepts apply to conducting polymers? The strength of fractal analysis stems from its ability to characterize complex objects such as polymers in terms of fractal dimensionality and the fractal concepts encountered in irregular comlex systems are present in conducting polymers due to random growth and aggregation. A point of view is presented.

  7. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Talking Point
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Measuring dynamic surface and interfacial tensions (pages 370–374)

      Dr. Reinhard Miller, Dr. Armin Hofmann, Rainer Hartmann, Andreas Halbig and Dr. Karl-Heinz Schano

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040513

      The surface and interfacial tensions of pure liquids and surfacttant solutions can be measured using a variety of techniques including the drop volume method (see Figure) and the ring or plate method. The various methods are briefly discussed and an automated version of the drop volume method which reliably produces results of the highest quality presented.

    2. Reaction pathways in organometallic chemical vapor deposition(OMCVD) (pages 375–378)

      Dr. Alfred Zinn, Dr. Burkhard Niemer and Prof. Herbert D. Kaesz

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040514

      The incorporation of heteroatom impurities derived from the ligands in organometallic chemical vapor deposition can now be avoided due to an understanding of the raection pathways involved. The development of the technique is traced, the various mechanisms discussed, and the important questions which still have to be answered presented.

  8. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Talking Point
    8. Research News
    9. Book Reviews

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