Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

June 1992

Volume 4, Issue 6

Pages fmi–fmi, 390–448

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040601

  2. Essays

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. The european polymer federation (pages 390–393)

      Prof. Hans W. Spiess

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040602

      Coordination of the activities of Europe's polymer scientists is one of the major aims of the European Polymer Federation (EPF). Two-year presidencies are served by representatives of the various national organizations (currently Germany and from next year Switzerland), workshops and symposia being organized aimed at encouraging the international transfer of reserach expertise. The President of the EPF outlines its activities.

    2. E-MRS network coordinating national programs on advanced materials (pages 394–395)

      Dr. Claudio Battistoni

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040603

      An E-MRS Network where the participants are those responsible for the national programs in advanced materials of various European countries, aimed at coordinating research efforts and presenting a unified front to the EEC is currently under Italian presidency. The President outlines the structure of the Network and presents its membership, its methods and aims.

  3. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. A novel tool for Surface Electronic Structure Calculations—insight into surface self-diffusion on metals (pages 396–401)

      Dr. Peter J. Feibehnan

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040604

      The diffusion of adatom clusters on surfaces and the nature and energetics of diffusion across a step are crucial in the synthesis of tailored materials, for example growing a structure involving atom A on substrate B. A recently developed method enables the study of such diffusion including concerted substitution diffusion, the mode in which atom A dives into the surface replacing atom B (see figure). The various aspects of the new method are presented.

    2. CHEMFET Devices for biomedical and environmental applications (pages 402–408)

      Aurelio Barbaro, Dr. Claudio Colapicchioni, Dr. Enrico Davini, Giuseppina Mazzamurro, Dr. Andrea Piotto and Filippo Porcelli

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040605

      Chemically-sensitive field effect transistors (CHEMFETS), modified with, for example, an ionophore embedde in an organic membrane, or with a biological receptor, are reviewed. The sensitivity and selectivity of the devices open up many applications in the biomedical field, for example an investigating the pH, glucose level, and sodium concentration in blood, and also in environmental monitoring where low concentrations of copper, cadmium and silver in water can be detected.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. 3,4-Dimethoxypyrrole: Monomer synthesis and conducting polymer formation (pages 409–411)

      Prof. Andreas Merz, Dr. Roland Scnwarz and Roland Schropp

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040606

      Processible conducting polymers based on 3, 4-substituted polythiophenes have been known for some time. Here, the synthesis and polymerization of an analogue to the thiophenes, the dialkoxypyrrole monomer shown in the figure, are reported. The polymer formed exhibits a relatively high conductivity pointing to a regular, possibly coiled structure.

    2. ESR studies of fluorinated fullerenes: Evidence for the formation of odd C60Fn species (pages 411–412)

      Igal Belaish, Prof. Dan Davidov, Prof. Heny Selig and Prof. John E. Fischer

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040607

      Paramagnetic odd-fluorinated fullerenes have been observed and characterized by electron spin resonance (ESR), revealing evidence that the fluorination process is inhomogeneous and that these species are not very stable. It is suggested, therefore, that the only method of stabilizing odd fluorinated fullerenes would be to capture the fluorine inside the C60 cage. The relative stability of the various fluorinated fullerenes is discussed.

    3. Donor–acceptor substituted polyenes: Orientation in mono- and multilayers (pages 413–416)

      Prof. Franz Effenberger, Claus-Peter Niesert, Dr. Lukas Häußling, Prof. Helmut Ringsdorf, Dr. Christoph Bubeck and Dr. Dieter Neher

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040608

      Ordered structures of donor-acceptor substituted polyenes (see Figure, where R'=phenyl or anthryl) formed using the Langmuir-Blodgett technique are reported. The mono- and multilayers have been traansferred to solid supports and their nonlinear optical characteristics examined using angledependent second harmonic generation (SHG).

    4. Superconductor thin films : In situ X-ray study on the reaction of hydrogen with epitaxial YBa2Cu3O7 Layers (pages 416–419)

      Prof. Robert Schöllhorn, Dr. Werner Paulus, Ralph Börner, Dr. Jürgen Schubert, Dr. Wilhelm Zander, Dr. Jeffrey Erxmaier and Dr. Alois Weidinger

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040609

      The critical temperatures (Tcs) of superconducting oxocuprates are known to be correlated with the hole concentration. This can be in turn influenced by isomorphic substitution of cationic lattice constituents, the variation of the oxygen stoichiometry via thermal processes, or, as reported here, by reaction with hydrogen as the insertation of H should be equivalent to the extinction of a corresponding amount of holes. The reaction with hydrogen has been examined using in situ X-ray diffraction.

    5. Morphology of pentadecanoic acid monolayers at the air/water interface studied by BAM (pages 419–424)

      Dirk Honig, Gernot A. Overbeck and Dr. Dietmar Mobius

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040610

      Brewster angle microscopy (BAM) provides the opportunity to visualize birefringence and long-range orientational order in floating monolayers with the advantage over fluorescence microscopy that no probe molecules are required. The Figure shows the hexagonal domains formed during the compression of pentadecanoic acid monolayers. The method and its potential are discussed.

    6. Characterization of lanthanum sulphides (pages 424–427)

      Michael Dunleavy, Prof. Geoffrey C. Allen and Michael Paul

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040611

      With application in infrared lenses, lanthanum sulphide and calcium lanthanum sulphide are ceramic materials which require a low defect density in order to minimize light scattering and maximize mechanical strength. Solution routes to monodispersed ceramics are investigated, offering materials with improved packing in the green body and considerable energy saving through the lower preparation temperatures.

    7. Conducting polymers as membranes with variable permeabilities for neutral compounds: Polypyrrole and polyaniline in aqueous electrolytes (pages 428–431)

      Dr. Volkmar M. Schmidt, Dr. Dietrich Tegtmeyer and Prof. Joachim Heitbaum

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040612

      A combination of mass spectrometry and cyclic voltammetry has proved a powerful tool for the simultaneous study of the structure changes and membrane properties of conducting polymers. The oxidized state of polypyrrole and the emeraldine structure of polyaniline, the two materials used in the study, are shown in the Figure.

  5. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Porous silicon – what is responsible for the visible luminescence? (pages 432–434)

      Prof. Michael J. Sailor and Prof. Karen L. Kavanagh

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040613

      Size-dependent quantum confinement effects have been invoked to explain the occurrence of vislble luminescence in porous silicon and TEM data supports the existence of crystalline Si domains which have dimensions small enough that one could expect such phenomena. However, is this the whole story? Various proposed explanations are discussed, and the recent observations of luminenscence in Si colloidal suspensions examined.

    2. The quest for magnetic polymers—caveat emptor (pages 435–438)

      Dr. Joel S. Miller

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040614

      Molecular Materials VI Part B: The sage of the search for magnetic polymers is completed with a balances analysis of the many claims for success which have been made. Both intrinsic and exterinstic sources of magnetism are discussed, the compounds under consideration including metallopolymers. The title of the article suggests one of the major conclusions — namely “buyer beware”.

    3. Diamond from fullerenes (pages 438–440)

      Dr. Manuelnúñez Regueiro

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040615

      Buckminsterfullerene has been enjoying intense attention from physicists and chemists alike in an attempt to modify and examine it in every possible way. Realistic applications for this form of carbon are, however, few and far between. Recently a group based in Grenoble have shown that it is possible to convert C60 (see Figure) into diamoned. The process and its consequences are discussed.

  6. Conference Reports

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Molecular electronics on the virgin islands (pages 441–442)

      Dr. Ari Aviram

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040616

      Gregory Girolami of the University of Illinois reports on an ACS session on “Molecular Routes to Materials”, and Ari Aviram of the IBM Watson Research Center gives his impessions on the “Molecular Electronics–Science and Technology” conference held recently on the Virgin islands.

    2. Molecular routes to materials in New York (pages 443–445)

      Prof. Gregory S. Girolami and Prof. Wayne L. Gladfelter

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040617

  7. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Materials Forum (pages 446–447)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040618

  8. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essays
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Conference Reports
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews

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