Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

September 1992

Volume 4, Issue 9

Pages fmi–fmi, 538–596

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040901

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Crystal growth in space (pages 538–539)

      Klaus-W. Benz

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040902

      Magterials science in space, including the crystal growth of organic and inorganic materials, is an interesting discipline that dates back to the growth of the first single crystals in space during the Apollo and Soyuz missions. Progress made since then is reviewed and the current goals of today's crystal growth experiments in space are considered. Crystals growth in spae may not be larger or more beautiful than those grown under terrestial conditions, but such experiments can provide answers to basic scientific questions.

  3. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Materials Forum (page 539)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040903

  4. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Atomistic modeling of materials properties by Monte Carlo Simulation (pages 540–547)

      Prof. Kurt Binder

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040904

      Monte Carlo simulation is a numerical tool that allows the reliable calculation of thermodynamic properties of strongly interacting many-body condensed matter systems. The figure shows a structure model of the D03 phase if iron–aluminium alloy used in the discussion of magnetism in the various crystallographycally ordered phases—an area in which Monte Carlo methods can make significant contributions.

    2. Molecular engineering of side-chain liquid-crystalline polymers by living cationic polymerization (pages 548–561)

      Prof. Virgil Percec and Prof. Dimitris Tomazos

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040905

      Molecularly designed polymers with narrow polydispersities and well-defined molecular weights, tailor-made mesophases, and reactive systems that can be used for further functionalization or cross-linking reactions are required for applications in areas as diverse as optical data storage, nonlinear optical systems and electro-optic displays. Recent progress is discussed in the molecular engineering of side-chain liquid-crystalline polymers by living coationic polymerization, statistical and sequential copolymerization, and chain and functionalization reactions.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Poly(isothianaphthene–bithiophefe): A new regularly structured polythiophene analogue (pages 562–564)

      Prof. Dominique Lorcy and Prof. Michael P. Cava

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040906

      A new, low band-gap polymer (see figure), a hybrid of polythiophene and polyisothianaphthene, has been synthesized. Current interest in the synthesis of low bandgap polymers is considerable in view of their potentially superior conductivity and nonlinear optical properties. The results complement well the independent analogous work reported by Bäuerle et al. in the following article.

    2. Synthesis and characterization of new annelated terheterocycles (pages 564–568)

      Dr. Peter Bäuerle, Dr. Günther Götz, Peter Emerle and Dr. Helmut Port

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040907

      New annelated terheterocycles have been synthesized and their properties compared with those of the parent systems. The new compounds have mixed structural elements coming from benzo[c]heterocycles, which combine an o-quinoidal π-system. The preceding article in this issue, from Lorcy and Cava, describes similar but independent work.

    3. New redox-responsive cryptands containing tetrathiafulvalene units (pages 568–570)

      Dr. Rafal Gasiorowski, Dr. Tine Jorgensen, Dr. Jørgen Møller, Thomas K. Hansen, Marek Pietraszkiewicz and Prof. Jan Becher

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040908

      Cation-sensitive electrochemically active systems have been provided with new potential model compounds in the form of recently synthesized TTF derivatives. The molecules, one of which is shown in the figure, are flexible and seem to be much better metal-ion ligands than the previously reported TTF-cage compounds.

    4. Metal-catalyzed alkynylation of (bromophenyl)-oligophenylene. A rapid route to thermoset precursors of high density monolithic glass-like carbon (pages 570–572)

      Eric B. Stephens and Prof. James M. Tour

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040909

      High-density glass-like carbon has numerous applications in the aerospace, electronic, medical implant and automotive industries. Much effort has been devoted to limiting the number of impregnation cycles necessary for the preparation of carbon in this form, and now it has been shown that organometallic methods permit a two-step (oligomerization and functionalization) entry into thermoset precursors for high-density glass-like carbon.

    5. Transformation of a kinetically prohibited mesophase of a linear polymer into an enantiotropic mesophase via cyclization (pages 572–576)

      Prof. Virgil Percec and Masaya Kawasumi

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040910

      The synthesis of a novel family of liquid crystals, cyclic compounds without chain ends, raises a series of fundamental questions, since many technological applications of conventional rod-like low molecular weight liquid crystals rely on teh chain ends for alignment. The figure shown the conformation of the cyclic tetramer in the nematic phase.

    6. Synthesis of Gallane-Amine adducts as potential precursors for GaAs and (AlGa)as MOVPE processes and the crystal structure of the {gallane · 1,3-bis(dimethylamino)propane} adduct H3Ga · N(CH3)2(CH2)3N(CH3)2 (pages 576–579)

      Prof. Jörg Lorberth, Reiner Dorn, Sigrid Wocadlo, Werner Massa, Ernst O. Göbel, Thomas Marschner, Harry Protzmann, Otto Zsebök and Wolfgang Stolz

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040911

      Novel gallane-amine adducts have been synthesized and tested as alternative sources for the epitaxial growth of GaAs and (AlGa)As thin layers by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. These precursors solve the problem of unwanted incorporation of carbon that arises with standard metalorganic sources. A single-crystal X-ray diffraction study provides more detailed insight into the molecular geometries of gallane-amine adducts.

    7. A construction principle of the κ-phase based on the efficient (O[BOND]H)donorOanion structural functionality: The examples of κ-(EDT–TTF(CH2OH))2X (X = ClOmath image and ReOmath image) (pages 579–581)

      Philippe Blanchard, Dr. Kamal Boubekeur, Dr. Marc Sallé, Prof. Dr. Guy Duguay, Prof. Michel Jubault, Prof. Alain Gorgues, Dr. James D. Martin, Dr. Enric Canadeli, Pascale Auban-Senzier, Dr. Denis Jérome and Dr. Patrick Batail

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040912

      The search for κ-phases of conducting and superconducting organic cation radical salts is difficult because it is not yet known which characteristics of the donor molecule are required for this structure to be generated. The figure shown the hydroxy-methyl-functionalized non-centroxymmetrical donor EDT-TTF(CH2OH), which has been purposely associated with the discrete tetrahedral perchlorate and perrhenate anions to form two new examples of a κ-phase.

  6. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. The colloidal process: A new approach to advanced ceramics (pages 582–586)

      Dr. Kiyoshi Sugita

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040913

      A third route to advanced ceramics, in addition to the traditional sintering and deposition-from-gas approaches, is provided by the colloidal process. This produces ceramic materials from solution precursors via a “colloidal state”. The various stages of the process are considered, along with applications, including the preparation of new derivatives, and commercialization.

    2. Containerless processing: A route to high-purity materials (pages 587–588)

      Makoto Nanko and Prof. Kozo Ishizaki

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040914

      Minimization of contamination is particularly important in the preparation of semiconductors and special glasses. A technique is presented in which contamination from the crucible during melting is avoided by suspending the material in high pressure gas. A particular application is the production of perfect spheres. The figure shows a perfect sphere of polyethylene formed by melting a cube like that on the left.

    3. Bioabsorbable surgical composite materials (pages 589–591)

      Prof. Pertti Törmälä

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040915

      Biomaterials, materials that are used in medical devices such as surgical implants, are often no longer biostable materials, for example metals or plastics, but bioabsorbable materials, which are degraded and digested in the body. These have the advantage that an operation to remove implants such as bone fracture fixation pins, screws and plates can be avoided. The work is aimed at developing self-reinforced bioabsorbable composites for use in fracture fixation, and in creating new tissues and artificial organs.

    4. A new class of self-assembled monolayers: Organic thiols on gallium arsenide (pages 591–594)

      Dr. Colin D. Bain

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040916

      The spontaneous assembly of long chain thiols on the clean oxide-free surface of gallium arsenide has recently been reported by a group at Penn State University. In the past, the substrates on which this was possible were restricted to the group 10 and 11 metals Au, Ag, Pt, and Cu, and the oxides of silicon, aluminum and silver. The work and its consequences for GaAs-based microelectronics are discussed.

  7. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Materials Forum (pages 594–595)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19920040917

  8. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Articles
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Materials Forum
    9. Book Reviews

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