Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

January 1994

Volume 6, Issue 1

Pages fmi–fmi, 7–90

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book reviews
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060101

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book reviews
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Advanced materials—A tale of two journals (pages 7–8)

      Dr. Peter Gregory

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060102

      Advanced Materials has changed during its first five years of publication. The development of the journal from its beginnings as a section of Angewandte Chemie to today's international and interdisciplinary journal is traced. Trends in the type, number and rate of acceptance of papers are pointed out, along with the increasing variety of their country of origin. Looking towards the future, the members of the new Editorial Advisory Board who will guide the journal in the coming months are introduced.

  3. Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book reviews
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Template-directed nucleation and growth of inorganic materials (pages 9–20)

      Dr. Brigid R. Heywood and Prof. Stephen Mann

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060103

      A new way to tailor the crystal chemistry of inorganic solids involves molecular recongnition between two-dimensional organic templates and embryonic inorganic aggregates. Langmuir monolayers adopted as model surfaces offer opportunities for molecular engineering of the template. The Figure shows one example of oriented nucleation of vaterite under octadecylamine monolayers.

    2. Ring-Opening Polymerization and ring-closing depolymerization (pages 21–36)

      Prof. Hartwig Höcker and Dr. Helmut Keul

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060104

      Ring-opening polymerization (ROP) of cyclic monomers is most suitable for the preparation of sequential copolymers of the type (AAB)n, the sequence being determined by the structure of the monomer. The thermodynamics and mechanisms of ROP are reviewed, including radical, cationic, anionic, and metathetical ROP, with may examples being given. As recycling becomes more important, interest in reversible polymerization, i.e., depolymerization, is increasing. The results available so far on the depolymerization of polymers obtained by ROP are discussed.

    3. Metathesis Polymerization: ROMPing towards new materials (pages 37–42)

      Prof. Vernon C. Gibson

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060105

      The introduction of a new generation of metathesis initiators (see Figure) in which the active site is incorporated within a relatively robust transition metal complex has had a significant impact on polymer synthesis. Key recent developments in the types of materials accessible, the control over microstructure possible, and the advantages of well-defined initialtors for the design and synthesis of new materials are reviewed.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book reviews
    9. Book Reviews
    1. A new class of planar-locked polyene dyes for nonlinear optics (pages 43–45)

      Dr. Ivan Cabrera, Dr. Olaf Althoff, Dr. Hong-Tai Man and Dr. Hyun N. Yoon

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060106

      A combination of strategies for optimizing the molecular hyper-polarizability have been employed in the design of the molecules reported here: an aromatic moiety is linked to a planar-fixed polyene chain. The synthesis and nonlinear optical (NLO) characterization (absorption and electric-field-induced second harmonic generation) of the materials are described and their NLO properties compared —Favorably—with those of 4′-dimethylamino-4-nitrostilbene, the prototypical organic material for electrooptic devices based on poled polymers.

    2. Calcite crystallization on gelatin films containing polyelectrolytes (pages 46–48)

      Dr. Giuseppe Falini, Dr. Massimo Gazzano and Prof. Alberto Ripamonti

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060107

      The promotion of oriented calcie crystallization by various polyelectrolytes, in particular their relative efficiency, has been investigated. Gelatin containing polyelectrolytes was found to overcome the compatibility problem between an inert matrix and the water-soluble polyelectrolytes as sociated with biomineralization (the Figure shows calctie crystals grown on such a substrate).

    3. Novel materials for non-ablative optical recording (pages 48–51)

      Dr. Michael R. Detty and Dr. James C. Fleming

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060108

      Novel materials for optical data storage based on a new recording method are described. Instead of pits or refractive index changes being produced in the recording medium, marks are the result of the generation of near -IR absorbing dyes, which leads to a change in the absorption of light from the read laser. The new materials, thin films of tellurium (IV) dihalide bound in a glass together with a sensitizing dye, undergo thermal reductive elimination of halogen on expousure to laser radiation. This technique could ind applications in electrophotographic mastering.

    4. Allyl(β-diketonato)palladium(II) complexes as precursors for palladium films (pages 51–54)

      Dr. Zheng Yuan and Prof. Richard J. Puddephatt

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060109

      Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) of palladium is at present not used commercially, despite the widespread use of palladium films in electronics and data storage, because suitable precursors are not available. New palladium precursors, ally (β-diketonato)palladium(II) complexes (see Figure) are reported, along with the conditions required for the formation of pure palladium films by CVD.

    5. Induction of bidimensionality in mixed Cu[BOND]Ti perovskites (pages 54–57)

      María Rosa Palacín, Dr. Amparo Fuertes, Dr. Nieves Casañ-Pastor and Dr. Pedro Gömez-Romero

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060110

      Control of structure and order in oxides is essential for the design of new superconducting cuprates. The intergrowth of perovskite and rock salt layers, as found in bismuth, thallium and, very recently, the record breaking mercury cuprates, is just one way to induce bidimensionality. Defect “all perovskite” oxides, such as Ln2Ba2C2Ti2O11 (Ln = La, Nd, Eu) are discussed as examples of a crystal -chemical approach to the induction of bidimensionality and order in mixed perovskite oxides of copper.

    6. A further polymerization effect following the electrochemical synthesis of poly(2,5-dimethoxyaniline) (pages 57–59)

      Gianfranco Pistoia

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060111

      A post-polymerization effect for poly(2,5-dimethoxyaniline), PDMA, has been observed in which PDMA inthe form of needles grows on the porous granular surface of the polymer previously formed by electrosynthesis (see Figure). Details of voltammetry experiments are given and an explanation for the post-polymerization effect proposed.

    7. Absolute calibration of microwave loss in ESR spectrometers (pages 59–62)

      Dr. Sivert H. Glarum, Dr. Arthur P. Ramirez and Dr. Robert C. Haddon

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060112

      Studies of field-dependent microwave losses are useful for the detection and characterization of superconducting materials. The measurements are made in a conventional ESR spectrometer, but until now the data interpretation has been mainly qualitative. A calibration procedure using just a frequency counter, DC voltmeter, and ball bearing is decribed. This allows a quantitative determination of magnetic losses to ∼ 5% accuracy without the need to determine the cavity Q, power level, or field strength.

    8. Monocrystalline Si3N4 filaments (pages 62–64)

      Prof. Klaus J. Hüttinger and Dr. Torsten W. Pieschnick

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060113

      In the search for structural materials suitable for high temperatures. monocrystalline silicon nitride filaments have been synthesized by catalyzed chemical vapor deposition. Such a filament with a catalyst particle at the tip is shown in the Figure. The effect of various flow rates of N2/NH3 and H2, the X-ray emission spectra, and the mechanical properties of the filaments are presented.

    9. α-Sexithiopene; A new photochromic material for a prototype ultrafast incoherent-to-coherent optical converter (pages 64–67)

      Denis Fichou, Dr. Jean-Michel Nunzi, Dr. Farbrice Charra and Dr. Nicola Pfeffer

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060114

      Ultrafast incoherent-to-coherent optical converters based on α-sexithiophen (α-6T) thin films are described. Unlike state-of-the-art materials for spatial light modulation such as liquied crystals and photorefractives, the spectral concentration and fast response times in α-6T thin films originate at the molecular level, and thus can be modeled using simple molecular engineering rules.

  5. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book reviews
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Ring-opening polymerization of metallocenophanes (pages 68–71)

      Prof. Ian Manners

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060115

      Processable polymers with transition metal atoms in the backbone are expected to have novel properties. Their synthesis has proved to be a challenge, but reently the first examples of wellcharacterized poly(-ferrocenylethylene)s, see Figure, have been produced by ring-opening polymerization of [2]metallorcenophanes with a hydrocarbon bridge.

    2. The zeolate ligand: From hydrolysis to capped semiconductor nanoclusters (pages 71–76)

      Prof. Geoffrey A. Ozin

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060116

      Visualizing the void spaces in zeolites as multidentate multisite macroligands, termed “zeolate ligands”, can lead to new insights. This concept is introduced, the structure, bonding, and reactivity patterns of the zeolate ligand are described and set in the context of the different approaches used to synthesize “capped” nanometer-dimension semiconductor materials. Finally, the process of depositing epitaxial layers of a II–VI semiconductor on a planar substrate is compared with the intrazeolite topotactic procedure of assembling a II–VI semiconductor nanocluster lattice on the curved internal surface of a zeolite.

    3. Self-supporting films of clay minerals and metal oxides: Molecular ceramics (pages 77–78)

      Munetoshi Isayama and Prof. Toyoki Kunitake

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060117

      Self-supporting, flexible films of montmorillonite that retain the fundamental characteristics of the mineral have been produced (The Figure shows a cross-sectional view). This demonstrates that one practical disadvantage of clay minerals-that they are usually only available as powders-can be overcome. Further examples of the extension of microscopic layer structures to the macroscopic scale to produce “molecularly defined ceramics” are presented.

    4. Nanometer-scale reversible recording using STM (pages 79–80)

      Dr. Akinobu Sato and Dr. Yuji Tsukamoto

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060118

      Data storae using the scanning tunneling microscope has come one step nearer. Instead of using changes in surface morphology for recording as previously proposed, changes in tunneling current are produced by locally induced phase transitions between crystalline and glassy forms of avanadate composite material. This has the advantages of being reversible, a room-temperature technique, and less susceptible to defects. The recording mechanism is though to the pulse-voltage-induced migration of sodium ions along the electric field.

  6. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book reviews
    9. Book Reviews
    1. Materials forum (pages 81–82)

      Article first published online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19940060119

  7. Book reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book reviews
    9. Book Reviews
  8. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Reviews
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Materials Forum
    8. Book reviews
    9. Book Reviews

SEARCH

SEARCH BY CITATION