Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

December 1995

Volume 7, Issue 12

Pages fmi–fmi, 961–1047

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071201

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews
    1. The IRC in materials for high-performance applications (pages 961–963)

      Prof. Michael H. Loretto

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071202

      The Interdisciplinary Research Centre based in Birmingham and Swansea concentrates on the study and development of high-performance materials. The Director of the IRC presents the structure, funding, and aims of the Centre and discusses the relevance of the work carried out with Government and contract funding for industry and academia.

  3. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews
    1. Doped and heteroatom-containing fullerene-like structures and nanotubes (pages 965–995)

      Prof. Reshef Tenne

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071203

      Sphere- and tube-like structures formed from materials containing partially or solely non-carbon elements (e.g. V2O5, see figure) are of potential interest in fields such as catalysis, lubrication, and electronic and photonic devices. A review of heteroatom-containing fullerene and nanotube structures is provided, both those formed from bulk materials and those with no bulk analogy

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  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews
    1. Scanning tunneling microscopy analysis of epitaxially crystallized IV-VI semiconductor surfaces and pn-junctions of IV-VI heterostructures (pages 997–1000)

      Dr. Wolfgang Stocker, Dr. Harald Böttner, Prof. Maurus Tacke and Prof. Hans-Joachim Cantow

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071204

      The characteristics of pn semiconductor junctions and the epitaxial layers at the interface are of great interest for the optimization of heterostructure device performance. Here, an STM study of narrow gap lead chalcogenide heterostructures is presented, providing insight into the influence of chemisorption of, for example, oxygen on the structure of the interface.

    2. Synthesis and characterization of noble metal colloids in block copolymer micelles (pages 1000–1005)

      Prof. Markus Antonietti, Eckhard Wenz, Dr. Lyudmila Bronstein and Dr. Mariana Seregina

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071205

      Noble metal nanoparticles have been used for more than 2000 years. Applications currently under discussion include solar cell technology, catalysis, and nonlinear optics, where the enormous interfacial surface area of the colloidally dispersed metals and their unique electronic properties resulting from size quantization are exploited. The problem of the stability of these materials has been addressed by using amphiphilic copolymer micelles (see figure) as a nanostructured stabilization environment for the metal particles

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    3. Properties of a hydroxydecyl-functionalized polythiophene synthesized by the iron trichloride route (pages 1005–1009)

      Prof. Carlo Della Casa, Prof. Paolo Costa Bizzarri, Dr. Elisabetta Salatelli and Prof. Franco Bertinelli

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071206

      The solubility of polythiophenes substituted with a hydroxydecyl chain is found to be closely related to the polymerization conditions. The presence of the hydroxy function does not compromise the processability of the polymer into films nor the thermochromic and solvatochromic properties of the materials, although hydrogen bonding between macromolecules is thought to result in the restriction of solubility.

    4. Novel ceramic particle synthesis for optical applications: Dispersion polymerized preceramic polymers as size templates for fine ceramic powders (pages 1009–1012)

      Laura L. Beecroft and Prof. Christopher K. Ober

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071207

      A shape template for small ceramic particles (see figure) is provided by the dispersion polymerization of preceramic polymers. The particle size can be closely controlled through adjusting the reaction conditions, allowing the design of materials for applications as diverse as optical composite materials, catalyst supports, and particulate reinforcement

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    5. Flexible arrays of submicrometer-sized polymeric light emitting diodes (pages 1012–1015)

      Dr. Magnus Granström and Prof. Olle Inganas

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071208

      Arrays of small polymer-based LEDs have been produced using a technique based on polymer self-organization. The active component, a polybithiophene, is shown to form small (50–200 nm) islands in a PMMA matrix when the two materials are mixed in an appropriate ratio. These islands become light emitters when electron- and hole-injecting contacts are applied. The generation of the arrays is described and the use of polymer-based hole-injecting contacts, which provide mechanical flexibility, is discussed.

    6. Engineering macromolecules self-assembly: Molecular tubes vs. protein sheets via single amino acid substitutions in E. coli glutamine synthetase (pages 1015–1017)

      Dr. Michael J. Dabrowski and Prof. William M. Atkins

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071209

      Protein engineering provides a rationale for obtaining self-assembling molecules which yield supramolecular arrays with varying quanternary architectures. An example is E. coli glutamine synthetase which can be manipulated to yield molecular tubes (see figure), cables, and hexagonally packed sheets

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    7. Molecular dynamics of poly(γ-octadecyl-co-methyl-L-glutamate) in ultrathin films and in the bulk (pages 1017–1020)

      Gernot Blum, Prof. Friedrich Kremer, Thomas Juworek and Prof. Gerkard Wegner

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071210

      Ultrathin layers of organic materials have great potential in advanced electronic and electro-optical applications. Little is, however, known about the dielectric properties and molecular dynamics of Langmuir-Blodgett film-forming materials. Here, thin LB films of the title compound have been studied and their properties compared with those of the corresponding bulk materials.

    8. Self-organized phases combined with IDC devices-switchable materials for solvent vapor detection (pages 1020–1023)

      Prof. Franz L. Dickert and Monika Keppler

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071211

      A new concept for analyte detection based on the combination of interdigitated capacitor technology with supramolecular structures (see this month's cover picture) is presented. Analyte molecules disturb the hydrogen bonds between pyridone units, and it is this structure-breaking effect (see figure) which is the basis of the sensor detection

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    9. Bis(ethylenethio)tetrathiafulvalene (BET-TTF), an organic donor with high electrical conductivity (pages 1023–1027)

      Dr. Concepciö Rovira, Judit Tarrés, Dr. Jaume Veciana, M. Carme Rovira, Dr. Juan J. Novoa, Dr. Syaulan Yang, Dr. Dwain O. Cowan and Dr. Enric Canadell

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071212

      Molecular charge transfer salts based on the highly conducting organic donor BET–TTF and small inorganic anions are presented. How the conductivity of the donor is related to its crystal structure has been investigated and the properties of the organic metal CT salts are discussed.

    10. On the quinoid structure of poly(isothianaphthene): A vibrational spectroscopic study (pages 1027–1030)

      Giuseppe Zerbi, Maria Chiara Magnoni, Ivan Hoogmartens, Raphael Kiebooms, Robert Carleer, Dirk Vanderzande and Jan Gelan

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071213

      The low band gap polyconjugated aromatic material PITN (see figure, left) is shown, on the basis of te results of Raman spectroscopy, to in fact have the quinoid structure in its electronic ground state. This is the first demonstration that these technologically interesting materials adopt the quinoid structure

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    11. Synthesis and linear optical spectroscopy of thioflavylium near-infrared absorbing dyes (pages 1030–1033)

      Dr. Chin-Ti Chen and Dr. Seth R. Marder

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071214

      Near-infrared adsorbing dyes have potential applications in optical recording and printing technology which employs inexpensive semiconductor lasers that emit light around 800 nm. A convenient and high yield synthesis of thioflavylium chromophores is presented, materials which are found to act as a powerful acceptor for creating such near-IR absorbing dyes.

    12. Bioactive silicon structure fabrication through nanoetching techniques (pages 1033–1037)

      Dr. Leigh T. Canham

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071215

      A microporous film of silicon is shown to induce hydroxyapatite growth both on itself and on neighboring areas of bulk silicon (e.g. see figure). This indicates that silicon could be developed as an active biomaterial, which has encouraging implications for the use of VLSI technology in, for example, invasive sensing and biosensing and other electronic prosthetic devices

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  5. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews
    1. Thermochromic composites and propagating polymerization fronts (pages 1038–1040)

      Dr. Istvan P. Nagy, Dr. Laszlo Sike and Prof. John A. Pojman

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071216

      Remote temperature sensing has been recently achieved using a new composite material produced using a propagating front of polymerization. The use of this polymerization technique for preparing uniform materials from components which phase separate upon reaction, and the properties and potential applications of the resulting materials are discussed.

    2. Polymer films with a self-organized honeycomb morphology (pages 1041–1044)

      Dr. Bernard François, Dr. Olivier Pitois and Dr. Jeanne François

      Article first published online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950071217

      Porous polymer films with a regular arrangement of pores (see figure) with a narrow pore size distribution have recently been reported. The preparation of the films from a variety of star polystyrenes, micellar polystyrenes, and block copolymers, the mechanism of formation, and the potential applications of the materials are presented

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  6. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews

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