Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

April 1995

Volume 7, Issue 4

Pages fmi–fmi, 343–426

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Conference Calendar
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070401

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Conference Calendar
    1. Document delivery services—the future today? (pages 343–347)

      Trevor Hing

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070402

      The world's literature delivered to your desk within hours or even minutes of a request. That is the dream of many researchers and the aim of a number of suppliers, including publishers, journal agents, and even telecommunication companies. The last five years have seen an explosive rowth in the demand and availability for such services. Thse trends are assessed from the point of view of Blackwells, one of the major developers of the services.

  3. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Conference Calendar
    1. Metallomesogenic Polymers (pages 348–369)

      Dr. Luis Oriol and José L. Serrano

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070403

      Processible, molecularly ordered metal-containing systms result when metallomesogens, liquid crystalline systems containing a metal atom, are integrated into the structure of a plymer (see Figure). The structural design of metallomesogenic polymers is reviewed and the potential applications of these interesting materials discussed.

  4. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Conference Calendar
    1. Synthesis and compositional tuning of the band properties of isostructural TMA–SnSxSe1–x−1 Nanoporous Materials (pages 370–374)

      Homayoun Ahari, Prof. Geoffrey A. Ozin, Dr. Robert L. Bedard, Dr. Srebri Petrov and Dr. David Young

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070404

      Crystalline, nanoporous tin chalcogenide semiconducting materials (see Figure) in which the band gap can be fine tuned chemically are reported. Variation of the proportions of slfur and selenium in the title materials results in the absorpton maxima red shifting with increasing selenium content over a range of 100 nm (350–450 nm).

    2. Nanoporous tin(IV) chalcogenides: Flexible open-framework nanbmaterials for chemical sensing (pages 375–378)

      Homayoun Ahari, Carol L. Bowes, Tong Jiang, Alan Lough, Prof. Geoffrey A. Ozin, Dr. Robert L. Bedard, Dr. Srebri Petrov and Dr. David Young

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070405

      Nanoporous sensor materials based on tin chalcogenides are shown to respond to be absorption of guest molecules by a measurable deformation of their open-framework structures which results in changes in heir optical absorption properties. The magnitude and type of deformation depends on the identity of the guest species. The materials and their response to a variety of guests are described.

    3. Polymerization of 10,12-docosadiyne-1,22- disulfate in self-assembled multilayers (pages 378–380)

      Farnaz Saremi and Prof. Bernd Tieke

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070406

      The polymerization of diacetylenes in self-assembled multilayers (see Figure) should lead to a new type of ultrathin films exhibiting interesting optical and electronic properties. Here the preparation of water-soluble diacetylene derivatives, multi-layer formation, and the UV polymerization of the derivatives are reported.

    4. Synthesis and pyrolysis of liquid organometallic precursors for advanced Si-Ti-C-N composites (pages 380–384)

      Jörg Hapke and Prof. Günter Ziegler

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070407

      Single-source precursors for hybrid nano-scaled SiC/Si3N4-TiC/TiN composites are reported. These precursors avoid the segregation of Ti and Si during pyrolysis and other probems associated with mixtures, blends, or slurries of precursors. They are liquids, oxygen-free (important due to the detrimental effects of oxide phases on the properties of non-oxide ceramics) and solvent-free, and employ polysilazane starting materials.

    5. Stereomutation in optically active regioregular polythiophenes (pages 385–387)

      Dr. Michiel M. Bouman and Prof. E. W. Meijer

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070408

      π-conjugated polymers substituted with optically active side chains (see Figure) have been studied using circular dichroism, a powerful technique which reveals conformational changes. Thermochroism with a unique stereomutation (see this month's cover also) has been observed in regioregular chiral polythiophenes.

    6. A blue light emitting polymer with phenylenevinylene segments in the side-chains (pages 388–390)

      Dr. Peter Hesemann, Horst Vestweber, Jörn Pommerehne, Dr. Rainer F. Mahrt and Dr. Andreas Greiner

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070409

      Polymer-based light emitting diodes constructed from amorphous materials with well-defined conjugated segments and high glass transition temperatures are reproted. It is shown that grafting 4-vinyl-trans-stilbene onto polystyrene results in side-chain polymers with conjugated segments in the side chains which have amorphous morphologies whereas blends between a conjugated unit and a matrix polymer exhibit unwanted crystallizaion.

    7. Extended hybrid tetrathiafulvalene π-donors with oligothienylenevinylene conjugated spacer groups (pages 390–394)

      El Hadj Elandaloussi, Dr. Pierre Frère, Dr. Jean Roncali, Prof. Michel Jubault, Prof. Alain Gorgues and Dr. Pascal Richomme

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070410

      Hybrid tetrathiafulvalenes (HTTFs) where the TTF units are linked by thienylenevinylene spacers (see Figure) are reported. It is found that the π donor properties of the materials are improved over analogues with oligothiophene spacers, and that they exhibit a smaller band gap. The evolution of the properties as a function of spacer length and the materials syntheses are discussed.

    8. Electroluminescent properties of self-assembled polymer thin films (pages 395–398)

      Dr. Jing Tian, Prof. Mark E. Thompson, Dr. Chung-Chih Wu, Dr. James C. Sturm, Dr. Richard A. Register, Dr. Michael J. Marsella and Prof. Timothy M. Swager

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070411

      Novel photo- and electroluminescent polymers based on poly(p-pyridyl vinylene), poly(p-pyridinium vinylene) and their butyl-substituted derivatives are reported. The materials exhibit good fluorescence quantum yields and the butyl derivatives are soluble in conventional organic solvents. Highly luminescent thin films of these materials can be prepared on a variety of substrates using a simple elecrostatic deposition technique and the high-temperature annealing step required for PPV films is not required.

    9. Room-temperature electrosynthesis of carbonaceous fibers (pages 398–401)

      Robert D. Herrick II, Audrey S. Kaplan, Beatrice K. Chinh, Dr. Michael J. Shane, Prof. Michael J. Sailor, Dr. Karen L. Kavanagh, Dr. Richard L. McCreeey and Dr. Jun Zhao

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070412

      Carbonaceous fibers are produced by the room-temperature electrochemical reduction of CCl4. These fibers (see Figure) are structurally and morphologically similar to carbon fibers produced at high temperatures, and are formed sponaneously at an electrode without the need for a template, during cathodic decomposition of CCl4 in non-aqueous electrolytes.

    10. Oligo(1-methylpyrrole)s—A model system in the conducting polymer series (pages 401–404)

      Nils Rohde, Marcus Eh, Dr. Uwe Geißler, Manfred L. Hallensleben, Beate Voigt and Dr. Michael Voigt

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070413

      The decrease of conductivity in poly(pyrrole)M when a substituent is introduced into the polymer either at the nitrogen or in the β positions is investigated. The drop in conductivity is two orders of magnitude by sbstitution in the 3 (β) position and five orders of magnitude when the substitution is made a nitrogen, in the 1-position. The various factors affecting te conductivity are analyzed for a series of oligomers with between one and six pyrrole units.

    11. C60 derivatives embedded in sol-gel silica films (pages 404–406)

      Dr. Michele Maggini, Prof. Gianfranco Scorrano, Prof. Maurizio Prato, Dr. Giovana Brusatin, Dr. Plinio Innocenzi, Prof. Massimo Guglielmi, Dr. Alessandro Renier, Dr. Raffaella Signorini, Dr. Moreno Meneghetti and Prof. Renato Bozio

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070414

      Trasparent sol-gel thin films and monoliths containing fullerene derivatives (e.g. see Figure) are reported. The sol-gel technique provides a low-temperature method to poduce homogeneous thin films and preliminary measurements reveal that these new commposite materials, the first sol-gel materials to contain C60 or its derivatives, exhibit interesting optical limiting properties.

  5. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Conference Calendar
    1. The liquid-crystalline-state polymerization of diacetylenes (pages 407–408)

      Dr. John Tsibouklis

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070415

      In-situ polymerization of liquid-crystalline diacetylene monomers provides can easily accessible route to conjugated polymeric materials with a controlled orientation. The reaction itself is explained and recent progress made by researchers aiming to produce interestng electroactive materials or fabricate novel device structures with anisotropic mechanical, thermal, and optical properties is reviewed.

    2. Molecular nanoclusters as precursors to conductive thin films and crystals (pages 409–413)

      Andrew C. Hillier, Dr. Joachim Hossick Schott and Prof. Michael D. Ward

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070416

      The role of epitaxy and orientation in the morphologies of thin films of organic conductors such as TTF-TCNQ (see Figure) is discussed. It is found that the anisotropy and direction of molecular bonding with respect to the interface, as well as interfacial interactions have a profound effect on the growth of the thin films.

    3. Mosaic tiling in molecular dimensions (pages 414–416)

      Prof. Gregory S. Ferguson and Elaine R. Kleinfeld

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070417

      A strategy for the stepwise formation of organic/inorganic multilayered films is presented. Structurally ordered, alternating stacks of a cationic organic polymer and anionic sheets of an inorganic mineral are produced with lattice spacings as low as 1.5 nm, architectures which have a great potential in the design of, for example, optical elements and sensors. The method allows the close control of the deposited thickness of the layers and a applicable to a wide variety of materials.

    4. Thin polymeric films in organic/inorganic diodes (pages 417–420)

      Dr. Luisa Torsi, Prof. Luigia Sabbatini and Dr. Pier G. Zambonin

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070418

      The coupling of biological and chemical systems with ast electronic transducers is expected to lead to compact chemo- or bio-chips which will further improve analytical detection limits. The highly controlled electrochemical deposition of thin polymeric films is a reliable method used to produce the active layers in such chips. Progress made in the application of this method in the design of devices containing layers of organic polymers in contact with inorganic semiconductors is reviewed.

  6. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Conference Calendar
  7. Conference Calendar

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Communications
    6. Research News
    7. Book Reviews
    8. Conference Calendar
    1. Conference Calendar (pages 425–426)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070422

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