Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

July 1995

Volume 7, Issue 7

Pages fmi–fmi, 605–677

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Conference Calendars
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070701

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Conference Calendars
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    1. Advanced materials and chemical vapor deposition (pages 605–606)

      Dr. Peter Gregory

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070702

      Chemical vapor deposition (CVD) is an important technique used to produce thin films of a wide variety of materials. It finds applications, for example, in the semiconductor industry in the production of chips, and is used to deposit6 ceramics, metals, semiconductors, and even organics. Towards the back of this issue a new section devoted exclusively to CVD and related technologies appears. every two months a similar section will be included in AM. The Essay describes the new section and our plans for its development.

  3. Articles

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Conference Calendars
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    1. The Colloid Chemical Approach to Nanostructured Materials (pages 607–632)

      Prof. Janos H. Fendler and Dr. Fiona C. Meldrum

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070703

      Nanocrystalline particulate films, dispersions of nanoparticles in monolayers in which the inter-particle distances can be controlled, and systems containing nanoparticles incorporated between the head groups of organic thin films (see Fig.) produced using a wet colloid-chemical approach are reviewed. Size-quantized metallic, magnetic, and semiconducting particles are cosnidered and the development of nanostructured devices discussed

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  4. Conference Calendars

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Conference Calendars
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    1. Conference Calendar (pages 632–633)

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070704

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Conference Calendars
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    1. Seven new organic superconductors in the system (ET)2M(CF3)4(solvent) (M = Cu, Ag): effect of solvent replacement (pages 634–639)

      Dr. John A. Schlueter, Dr. Jack M. Williams, Dr. Urs Geiser, James D. Dtulek, Margaret E. Kelly, Scott A. Sirchio, Dr. K. Douglas Carlson, Dr. D. Dieter Naumann, Dr. Thomas Roy and Dr. Charles F. Campana

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070705

      Superconductivity in k-phase organic charge transfer salts and its relation to structural differences caused by the solvent present is analyzed on the basis of seven new superconductors in the BEDT–TTF system. The superconducting salts have TcS between 2.6 and 11.1 K. The electrocrystallization of the new materials is described and the structure–proeprty relationships discussed.

    2. Novel metallic charge-transfer complexes composed of a [3] radialene type acceptor: A 1,2-Bis(p-benzoquino)-3-12-(dicyanomethylene)-2,5-selenoquinojcyclopropane Derivative (pages 639–641)

      Prof. Kazuko Takahashi and Shinji Tarutani

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070706

      Molecular metals based on the [3]radialene structure (see Fig.) as the acceptor are reported. They represent the first radialene and also the first non-benzenoid aromatic compounds to afford molecular metals. Compressed pellets of these acceptrs complexed with TTF and TTT exhibit remarkable metallic behavior. The synthesis and the characterisation of the materials are presented

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    3. Chiral effects in the second-order optical nonlinearity of a poly(isocyanide) monolayer (pages 641–644)

      Dr. M. Martti Kauranen, Dr. Thierry Verbiest, Prof. André Persoons, Prof. E. W. Meijer, Dr. M. N. Teerenstra, Prof. A. J. Schouten, Prof. R. J. M. Nolte and Dr. E. E. Havinga

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070707

      The influence of chirality on the nonlinear optical properties of poly(isocyanide)s is examined. It is found that the chiral and nonlinear properties can occur on different levels of the molecular structure and can therefore be separately tuned, but that they still can be coupled together. The NLO properties of chiral molecules can also be enhanced significantly byoptimizing the magnetic contriutions to the nonlinearity, an important result for applicatons in electro-optics.

    4. New angular molecular donor containing two tetrathiafulvalene (ttf) units fused to selenophene: synthesis, x-ray structure, cyclic voltammetry and conducting charge transfer complex with TCNQ (pages 644–646)

      Dr. Changsheng Wang, Dr. Arkady Ellern, Prof. James Y. Becker and Prof. Joel Bernstein

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070708

      Extended TTF-based donor systems based for the first time on selenophene (see Fig.) are reported. Selenophene is an isologue of thiophene but has a stronger electron-donating ability, a larger size, and a higher polarizability. These factors should lead to materials with increased bandwidth, improved dimensionality, increased electrical conductivity, and reduced on-site Coulombic repulsion. The one-pot synthesis of these materials and their complexation with TCNQ are presented

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    5. αThiophene octamer as a new class of photo-active material for photoelectrical conversion (pages 647–648)

      Naoki Noma, Toshimitsu Tsuzuki and Prof. Yasuhiko Shirota

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070709

      α-thiophene octamer (α-8T) is shown to be a suitable materials for application as the p-type semiconductor component in photovoltaic devices. Combined with a perylene pigment as the n-type semicondctor, the α-8T is used to produce a pn heterojunction cell which exhibits a fill factor of 0.5 ad a conversion efficiency of 0.6% for irradiation of while light, a performance comparable to that reported for copper- and titanyl-phthalocyanine-based devices. The application of α-8T would allow vacuum deposition techniques to be used in the production of the cells.

    6. Lithographic molding: A convenient route to structures with sub-micrometer dimensions (pages 649–652)

      Dr. James L. Wilbur, Enoch Kim, Younan Xia and Prof. George M. Whitesides

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070710

      Elastomeric stamps with submicrometer features for use in the recently reported microcontact printing procedure are produced without the need for routine access to cleanrooms. The new technique is therefore an alternative to the use of photolithography for the fabrication of the stamps, simplifying the technology required to generate structures with sub-micrometer dimensions (e.g. see Fig.)

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    7. Cu2O quantum-dot particles prepared from nanostructured copper (pages 652–655)

      Prof. Erich Knözinger, Dr. Antje Kellersohn, Dr. Walter Langel and Dr. Michael Giersig

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070711

      Higly disperse copper oxides are widely used as catalysts for industrial processes, for example in methanol synthesis. The supports used for these catalysts hamper their characterization of the copper oxide species involved. Here, a procedure for the preparation of unsupported, nanostructured, and pure Cu2O samples is reported. The process involved the production of nanonstructured copper and the subsequent controlled oxidation of this material.

    8. Molecular structure of sel-organized layers of N-Octyl-D-guconamide (pages 656–659)

      Konrad Crämer, Dr. Beate Pfannemüller, Dr. Sergei N. Magonov, Prof. Werner Kreutz and Dr. Igor Tuzov

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070712

      AFM images reveal deaths of self-organized amphiphile structures of the title compound (see Fig.). Information on the morphology and the molecular order is obtained indicating that the structures are stabilized by relatively strong intermolecular interactions. The results are compared with those from studies of the same materials in gel and crystal states

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    9. Ferroelectric and electroclinic properties of the chiral mesogen {Bis-[N-4-(S-(–)-β-citronelloxy)Phenyl-4′-(N-Dodecyloxy)-salicylaldiminato]}Palladium(II) (pages 659–662)

      Prof. Mauro Ghedini, Daniela Pucci, Nicola Scaramuzza, Lachezar Komitov and Prof. Sven T. Lagerwall

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070713

      Chiral metallomesogens, especially those exhibiting SA* and SC* phases, are of potential interest for applications in electro-optics. The performance of the materials depends on a number of factors, including spontaneous polarization, switching speed, and tilt angle. Here, the first reports of the electroclinic behavior of a number of metallomesogens are made.

    10. Silicon wafer bonding via designed monolayers (pages 662–665)

      Prof. Ulrich Gösele, Dr. Johann Steinnkirchner, Torsten Martini, Dr. Manfred Reiche and Dr. Gerhard Kästner

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070714

      Silicon wafer bonding is a technology which allows two silicon wafers to stick together without any glue (e.g. see Fig.). The technique is used in the areas of microelectronics, micromechanics, and power electronics. Hydrolyzed tetramethoxysilane is used in he new bonding process presented here, providing a low-temperature method of wafer bonding compatible with the presence of microelectronics aluminum metallization

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    11. Octahedral, liquid-crystalline complexes of 1,4-diazabutadienes with rhenium(I) (pages 665–667)

      Dr. Stefania Morrone, Gayle Harrison and Dr. Duncan W. Bruce

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070715

      Mesomorphic tansition metal complexes have been shown in the past to exhibit technically interesting properties, including a igh birefringence, high linear and nonlinear polarizability, and igh linear dichroism. Here, a general approach to the design and synthesis of metal-containing liquid crystals based on high coordination number centers is presented. Diazautadienes are used as the ligands for the generation of the complexes and it is thought that they will find wide applicability in he design of new metallomesogens.

  6. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Articles
    5. Conference Calendars
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    1. Noncovalent synthesis of organic fibers (pages 669–671)

      Prof. Fredric M. Menger, Dr. Stephen S. Lee and Dr. Xueliang Tao

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070716

      The self-assembly of organic molecules into fibers (e.g. see Fig.) is reversible. In the dreams of chemists the exploitation of this phenomenon could lead, for example, to the use of bio-compatible fibrous organics to simulate blood clots. Dissolution of the clot could be affected thermally or chemically. Recently developed technology which could make this sort of ting possible in the future is reviewed

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    2. Crystal designing organic ferrimagnets (pages 672–674)

      Dr. Akira Izuoka, Dr. Reiji Kumai and Prof. Tadashi Sugawara

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070717

      Controlling the structure of a molecular assembly by using a molecule carrying both a functional site and an orientation controlling site has recently been achieved. The latter site plays the role of arranging the functional molecules by utilizing hydrogen bonding interactions or charge-transfer interactions between the orientation controlling sites. The functional molecules then self-assemble to create highly ordered molecular architectures. The technique is explained.

    3. Self-assembled nanoscale tubular ensembles (pages 675–677)

      Dr. M. Reza Ghadiri

      Version of Record online: 15 SEP 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19950070718

      Nanoscale tubular biomaterials (e.g. see Fig.) produced by the self-assembly of peptide nanotube structures have a potentially wide range of applications in chemistry, biology, and materials science. The methods of producing such structures are reviewed and a number of potential applications discussed

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