Advanced Materials

Cover image for Advanced Materials

1997

Volume 9, Issue 9

Pages fmi–fmi, 689–762

  1. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    1. Masthead (page fmi)

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090901

  2. Essay

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    1. Euroscience: Linking science and society (pages 689–690)

      Dr. Françoise Praderie

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090902

      An Association for the Advancement of Science for Europe? In March this year at a meeting in Strasbourg, France, attended by about 150 people, Euroscience, a Europe-wide association open to all those interested in science and technology—and particularly their role in society—came into being. Dr. Praderie, General Secretary of Euroscience, outlines the objectives and aims of the association, current and proposed activities, and longer term prospects. An invitation to join is extended to all readers.

  3. Materials Forum

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    1. Materials Forum (page 692)

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090903

  4. Review

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    1. Molecular Recognition of Organized Assemblies via hydrogen bonding in aqueous media (pages 695–710)

      Dr. Constantinos M. Paleos and Dr. Dimitris Tsiourvas

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090904

      Molecular recognition of non-biological systems in aqueous media presents problems arising from the inherent difficulty of formation of host-guest systems. Examples are given for recognition occurring at the air-water interface—the most common type, where receptors from a monolayer at the interface (see Figure)—or in micelles or vesicles. The particular role of directional hydrogen-bonding interactions is emphasized.

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    1. A ferrocene crown ether–functionalized polypyrrole film electrode for the electrochemical recognition of barium and calcium cations (pages 711–713)

      Dr. Alina Ion, Dr. Ion Ion, Dr. Angela Popescu, Dr. Mihaela Ungureanu, Dr. Jean-Claude Moutet and Dr. Eric Saint-Aman

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090905

      Transfer of the recognition activity of a ferrocene ionophore to an electrode surface from the homogeneous phase has been successfully accomplished for the first time. The synthesis and electrochemical characterization of a new pyrrole-substituted ferrocene crown ether are described, followed by the formation of the corresponding polymer film modified electrode. It is shown that the electrode exhibits amperometric recognition in an organic solvent of Ca2⊕ and Ba2⊕ among the alkaline and alkaline earth metal cations.

    2. Novel κ-type organic metal based on a bis-fused tetrathiafulvalene derivative (pages 714–716)

      Dr. Yohji Misaki, Takeshi Miura, Masateru Taniguchi, Hideki Fujiwara, Prof. Tokio Yamabe, Dr. Takehiko Mori, Dr. Hatsumi Mori and Dr. Shoji Tanaka

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090906

      A novel k-type organic metal based on 4,5,-cyclohexeno-TTP (where TTP is bis-fused tetrathiafulvalene, TTF), see Figure, is reported. The synthesis, structure, and electrical properties are described. It is suggested that, following this demonstration of a TTF-based organic metal without a chalcogeno-based substituent, further CH-TTP salts should be investigated for conductivity and superconductivity.

    3. Synthesis and photoconducting properties of poly(p-phenylenevinylene)containing a bis(terpyridine)ruthenium(II) complex (pages 716–719)

      Dr. Wai Yue Ng and Dr. Wai Kin Chan

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090907

      Can a photosensitizer enhance the photoconductivity of PPV (poly(p-phenylenevinylene))? The use of a palladium-catalyzed coupling reaction is described for the production of a series of PPV derivatives that contain different amounts of a bis(terpyridine) ruthenium(II) metal complex, a well-known photosensitizer when covalently linked to electron donating and accepting groups. Results of optical and electrical investigations are presented that indicate that the opening question can be answered in the affirmative.

    4. A novel family of amorphous molecular materials containing an oligothiophene moiety as color-tunable emitting materials for organic electroluminescent devices (pages 720–722)

      Tetsuya Noda, Hiromitsu Ogawa, Naoki Noma and Prof. Yasuhiko Shirota

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090908

      The color of light emitted by organic electroluminescent devices can be tuned between light blue and orange in the family of materials presented here simply by varying the conjugation length (n = 1 to 4, see Figure) of the oligothiophene moiety. The synthesis of the amorphous molecular materials and the optical behavior of single-layer electroluminescent devices based on them—see also the cover—are described.

    5. Effect of the anion on the level and aging of the conducting state of electropolymerized 3-methylthiophene thin films (pages 722–725)

      Catherine Fuvre, Dr. Louis Abello and Dr. Didier Delubouglise

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090909

      The unique character of the triffimide anion has been revealed in a study of how the doping anion affects the properties of conducting polymer thin films using poly(3-methylthiophene) doped with triflimide ((CF3SO2)2N), perchlorate (CIO). Variations in film morphology, conductivity, and the time dependence of the conductivity are described. Particularly noticeable are the differences in surface de-doping, which lasts of up the one month in the trifflimide-doped films.

    6. Transparent flexible organic light-emitting devices (pages 725–728)

      Gong Gu, Dr. Zilan Shen, Dr. Paul E. Burrows and Prof. S. R. Forrest

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090910

      Ultra-lightweight, portable, roll-up, full-color flat panel displays move into the realm of the possible with the demonstration of transparent, flexible organic light-emitting devices (T-FOLEDs). The emission properties of the T-FOLEDs and the effect of flexing are reported. The Figure shows a T-FOLED after repeated bending—cracks appear when a 7 mm radius of curvature is reached.

    7. Stepwise assembly in three dimensions: Preparation and characterization of layered gold nanoparticles in porous silica matrices (pages 728–731)

      Dr. Hongyou Fan, Dr. Yuqing Zhou and Prof. Gabriel P. Lopez

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090911

      Arrays of metal nanoparticles with well-defined two- or three-dimensional ordered structures in a solid matrix have many potential applications, e.g., novel optical gratings, data-storage systems, and microelectronics. A synthetic method is described for preparing multilayer composite thin films with metal nanoparticles in porous ceramic matrices through colloidal adsorption and sol-gel processing. Techniques for the control of the interparticulate distance, the number of particles in each layer, the interlayer distance, and the pore structure are outlined.

    8. Highly ordered polymer–inorganic nanocomposites via monomer self assembly: In situ condensation approach (pages 731–736)

      David H. Gray, Dr. Sanlin Hu, Elizabeth Juuang and Prof. Douglas L. Gin

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090912

      A highly ordered organic inorganic nanocomposite can be synthesized by photopolymerizing an inverse hexagonal lyotropic liquid crystal phase consisting of an amphiphilic monomer and organic crosslinker as the organic matrix and a sol-gel silica precursor solution as the hydrophilic component (see Figure). In situ silica condensation gives the ordered nanocomposite. A simple example is discussed.

    9. Silver nanocluster formation in silica coatings by the sol-gel route (pages 736–741)

      Dr. Lidia Armelao, Dr. Renzo Bertoncello and Dr. Mattia De Dominicis

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090913

      The sol-gel synthesis of silver-nanocluster-doped silica coatings is described, which leads to samples containing only silver cations. Subsequent thermal treatments cause these to evolve into metal silver particles with spherical shape, narrow size distribution, and homogeneous dispersion. It is shown that the size, distribution, and stability of the silver clusters can be controlled by the choice of precursor compounds and subsequent thermal treatments. A hypothesis is put forward to explain the cluster formation and observed heat-dependent color change.

    10. Stability of molded polydimethylsiloxane microstructures (pages 741–746)

      Dr. Emmanuel Delamarche, Heinz Schmid, Dr. Bruno Michel and Dr. Hans Biebuyck

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090914

      How stable are the features in elastomeric stamps—as used in microcontact printing (μCP) and micromolding in capillaries (MIMIC)—during their formation and subsequent application? Their stability is examined with respect to aspect ration and forces during handling. In the Figure, lines in the structure (gold on silicon), produced using an elastomeric stamp, can be seen to have merged into larger ensembles.

    11. Controlling electronic properties of CdTe by adsorption of dicarboxylic acid derivatives: Relating molecular parameters to band bending and electron affinity changes (pages 746–749)

      Rami Cohen, Dr. Stéphane Bastide, Prof. David Cahen, Dr. Jacqueline Libman, Prof. Abraham Shanzer and Dr. Yossi Rosenwaks

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090915

      Surface modifications have great potential to control semiconductor properties such as band bending (BB) and electron affinity (EA). It is demonstrated that tailor-made, surface-binding molecules—discarboxylic acid derivatives with aromatic substituents in this case—can be used to modify systematically both the EA and BB of CdSe. The molecular parameters that affect each of these have been resolved and a semiquantitative model is put forward to rationalize the observed molecule-induced band-bending energies.

  6. Research News

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews
    1. Spatially functionalized polymer surfaces produced via cell-mediated lithography (pages 751–755)

      Dr. Cameron Alexander and Dr. Evgeny N. Vulfson

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090916

      Cell-mediated lithography—which generates polymer particles with anisotropic patches of addressable functionality of exactly the same size and shape as the template microorganism—is described. The Figure shows the first step in the process. Similarities with lithography using self-assembled monolayers of alkane-thiolates on gold substrates are pointed out and some of the many practical applications indicated.

    2. Creation of thermo-responsive ion-track membranes (pages 757–758)

      Dr. Masaru Yoshida, Dr. Masaharu Asano, Dr. Takeshi Suwa, Dr. Nicole Reber, Dr. Reimar Spohr and Prof. Ryoichi Katakai

      Version of Record online: 29 OCT 2004 | DOI: 10.1002/adma.19970090917

      Temperature-responsive membranes have been produced by combining ion-track membranes with a temperature-responsive hydrogel, which swells and absorbs water below 14°C, releasing it and shrinking above this temperature. The preparation of the ion-track membranes is described and how the polymer hydrogel is grafted onto the surfaces of the membrane and the walls of the cylindrical pores (formed by the etched ion tracks). An investigation of between fully open and fully closed pores at different temperatures.

  7. Book Reviews

    1. Top of page
    2. Masthead
    3. Essay
    4. Materials Forum
    5. Review
    6. Communications
    7. Research News
    8. Book Reviews

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