Enabling New Classes of Templated Materials through Mesoporous Carbon Colloidal Crystals

Authors

  • Matthew D. Goodman,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Beckman Institute University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Kevin A. Arpin,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Beckman Institute University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Agustin Mihi,

    1. Department of Materials Science and Engineering Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Beckman Institute University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Narihito Tatsuda,

    1. Inorganic Materials Laboratory Toyota Central R & D Labs. Inc Nagakute, Aichi, Japan
    2. Materials Research Laboratory Toyota Research Institute North America, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
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  • Kazuhisa Yano,

    Corresponding author
    1. Inorganic Materials Laboratory Toyota Central R & D Labs. Inc Nagakute, Aichi, Japan
    2. Materials Research Laboratory Toyota Research Institute North America, Ann Arbor, MI, USA
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Beckman Institute University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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  • Paul V. Braun

    Corresponding author
    • Department of Materials Science and Engineering Frederick Seitz Materials Research Laboratory, Beckman Institute University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL, USA
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E-mail: pbraun@illinois.edu, k-yano@mosk.tytlabs.co.jp

Abstract

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Porous oxide and semiconductor inverse opals are obtained through an orthogonal process that utilizes a colloidal crystal formed from monodisperse starburst carbon spheres as a template. Through atomic layer deposition and static chemical vapor deposition, the templated materials penetrate deep into the ultra-high surface area colloids, generating the porous inverse opal after carbon removal. The carbon can be removed by either thermal oxidation or oxygen plasma, processes which do not etch the templated materials.

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