Live Cell Imaging: Extraordinary Transmission-based Plasmonic Nanoarrays for Axially Super-Resolved Cell Imaging (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2014)

Authors

  • Jong-ryul Choi,

    1. School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Kyujung Kim,

    1. Program for Nanomedical Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
    2. Department of Nanofusion Technology, Pusan National University, Miryang, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Youngjin Oh,

    1. School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Ah Leum Kim,

    1. Program for Nanomedical Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Sook Young Kim,

    1. Department of Microbiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
    Search for more papers by this author
  • Jeon-Soo Shin,

    Corresponding author
    1. Program for Nanomedical Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
    2. Department of Microbiology, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
    3. Institute for Immunology and Immunological Diseases and Severance, Biomedical Science Institute, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul, Korea
    • School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120–749 Korea

    Search for more papers by this author
  • Donghyun Kim

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
    2. Program for Nanomedical Science and Technology, Yonsei University, Seoul, Korea
    • School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120–749 Korea

    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

image

Extraordinary transmission-based axial imaging (EOT-AIM) is developed for cell microscopy by J.-S. Shin, D. Kim, and co-workers, in which localization by nanoaperture arrays performs near-field sampling of target fluorescence up to a preset axial distance. EOT-AIM achieves an axial super-resolution as small as 20 nm for a depth range of 500 nm. On page 48, the measurement of intracellular cholera toxin subunit B conjugated with FITC successfully confirms that both the resolution and the axial imaging range are improved significantly as compared to conventional methods.

Ancillary