Advanced Optical Materials

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 1

January 2013

Volume 1, Issue 1

Pages 1–106

  1. Cover Picture

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      Colorimetrics: Colorimetric Plasmon Resonance Imaging Using Nano Lycurgus Cup Arrays (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2013) (page 1)

      Manas Ranjan Gartia, Austin Hsiao, Anusha Pokhriyal, Sujin Seo, Gulsim Kulsharova, Brian T. Cunningham, Tiziana C. Bond and Gang Logan Liu

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370001

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      A nanocup structure that mimics the Lycurgus cup effect enables nanoplasmonic spectroscopy to be used for colorimetric sensing, requiring only the naked eye or ordinary visible color photography. Enhanced optical transmission from the subwavelength cup structures couples with the localized surface plasmon from metal nanoparticles on the side walls of the cup, creating extraordinary sensitivity and visible color changes. Utility of the sensor for chemical imaging, biomolecular imaging, and integration to portable microfluidics devices for lab-on chip-applications is demonstrated by Liu and co-workers on page 68.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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      Magnetoplasmonics: Magnetoplasmonics: Combining Magnetic and Plasmonic Functionalities (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2013) (page 2)

      Gaspar Armelles, Alfonso Cebollada, Antonio García-Martín and María Ujué González

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370002

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      Cebollada and co-workers review on page 10 how the combination of plasmonic and magnetic functionalities gives rise to magnetoplasmonic systems, where both the magneto-optical and plasmonic properties can be engineered. For example, the effect of the magnetic field on the optical properties of these systems can be increased under plasmon excitation. Additionally, in these systems, the wavelength of the propagating surface plasmons can be externally controlled under the application of a magnetic field.

  3. Back Cover

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      Surface Plasmon Resonance: Large-Area Gold/Parylene Plasmonic Nanostructures Fabricated by Direct Nanocutting (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2013) (page 108)

      Vaida Auzelyte, Benjamin Gallinet, Valentin Flauraud, Christian Santschi, Shourya Dutta-Gupta, Olivier J. F. Martin and Juergen Brugger

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370003

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      The rendering on the back cover shows the release of a silicon stamp used for the direct thermal imprint of gold over a parylene C bilayer. The periodic high-resolution gold features are nanocut and vertically displaced into the polymer in a single step by V. Auzelyte, J. Brugger, and co-workers on page 50, resulting in a double-layer structure supporting Fano-like surface plasmon resonances in the visible range.

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  5. Contents

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  6. Editorial

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      Advanced Optical Materials: Independence 2013 (pages 8–9)

      Peter Gregory, Guido Fuchs and Eva Rittweger

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370009

  7. REVIEW

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    1. Magnetoplasmonics: Combining Magnetic and Plasmonic Functionalities (pages 10–35)

      Gaspar Armelles, Alfonso Cebollada, Antonio García-Martín and María Ujué González

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201200011

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      Magnetoplasmonic systems possess both plasmonic and magnetic functionalities. By a smart combination of plasmonic and ferromagnetic materials with magnetooptical activity it is possible to design nanostructures whose magneto-optical properties are enhanced by plasmon resonance excitation, and whose plasmonic properties are modulated by an external magnetic fi eld. These structures fi nd applications in sensing devices as well as in optical communications.

  8. FRONTISPIECE

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      Solar Cells: High-Performance Polymer Solar Cells Using an Optically Enhanced Architecture (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2013) (page 36)

      Alberto Martínez-Otero, Xavier Elias, Rafael Betancur and Jordi Martorell

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370006

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      In the multilayer architecture of a polymer solar cell, Martínez-Otero, J. Martorell, and co-workers introduce a highly transparent material as a buffer layer which enhances the reflectivity of the solar device. On page 37, they describe how this results in an optimal optical field distribution to increase light harvesting by the absorber layer, which maximizes the conversion of sun photons into electrical charges by the photovoltaic device.

  9. COMMUNICATIONS

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    1. High-Performance Polymer Solar Cells Using an Optically Enhanced Architecture (pages 37–42)

      Alberto Martínez-Otero, Xavier Elias, Rafael Betancur and Jordi Martorell

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201200027

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      An optically enhanced architecture can be used to fabricate high-performance polymer solar cells. The basic optical parameters that control light propagation in a layered device are such that an optimal light harvesting is achieved. The general character of such optically enhanced architecture is demonstrated by applying it to two different kinds of low bandgap polymers.

    2. Metamaterial-Based Two Dimensional Plasmonic Subwavelength Structures Offer the Broadest Waveband Light Harvesting (pages 43–49)

      Qiuqun Liang, Taisheng Wang, Zhenwu Lu, Qiang Sun, Yongqi Fu and Weixing Yu

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201200009

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      A two-dimensional pyramidal shape metamaterial-based absorber composed of multiple alternating metallic and dielectric thin films is proposed. This pyramid metamaterial absorber is a broadband, wide-angle, omni-directional and polarization-insensitive light absorbing device. The absorption performance of the absorber is excellent, with an absorptivity of nearly 100% at the infrared waveband from 1 μm to 14 μm for normal incidence.

    3. Large-Area Gold/Parylene Plasmonic Nanostructures Fabricated by Direct Nanocutting (pages 50–54)

      Vaida Auzelyte, Benjamin Gallinet, Valentin Flauraud, Christian Santschi, Shourya Dutta-Gupta, Olivier J. F. Martin and Juergen Brugger

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201200017

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      High-resolution multilayer plasmonic nanostructures are made in a single fabrication step by nanocutting a gold and parylene C bilayer.. A silicon stamp is used to cut the gold film and vertically displace the nanocut shapes into the polymer. Periodic Au nanopatterns in single and double-layer configurations are fabricated down to the sub-100 nm range, supporting plasmon resonances in the visible range.

  10. FRONTISPIECE

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      SERS Substrates: Silver-Coated Rose Petal: Green, Facile, Low-Cost and Sustainable Fabrication of a SERS Substrate with Unique Superhydrophobicity and High Efficiency (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2013) (page 55)

      Bin-Bin Xu, Yong-Lai Zhang, Wen-Yi Zhang, Xue-Qing Liu, Jian-Nan Wang, Xu-Lin Zhang, Dan-Dan Zhang, Hao-Bo Jiang, Ran Zhang and Hong-Bo Sun

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370007

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      Y.-L. Zhang, H.-B. Sun and co-workers report the facile fabrication of highly efficient SERS substrates from natural rose petals. The unique surface superhydrophobicity and the hierarchical nature of the structures contribute to their high sensitivity and low detection limit.

  11. COMMUNICATIONS

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    1. Silver-Coated Rose Petal: Green, Facile, Low-Cost and Sustainable Fabrication of a SERS Substrate with Unique Superhydrophobicity and High Efficiency (pages 56–60)

      Bin-Bin Xu, Yong-Lai Zhang, Wen-Yi Zhang, Xue-Qing Liu, Jian-Nan Wang, Xu-Lin Zhang, Dan-Dan Zhang, Hao-Bo Jiang, Ran Zhang and Hong-Bo Sun

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201200019

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      The green, facile, low-cost and sustainable fabrication of a SERS substrate is reported, through physical vapor deposition of silver on rose petals. The hierarchical structures on the petal contribute to not only the superhydrophobicity, but also E-field enhancements. Therefore, the rose-petal-based SERS substrate shows high efficiency in the detection of R6G, and a detection limit of 10-9 M is achieved.

    2. Fast and Low-Power All-Optical Tunable Fano Resonance in Plasmonic Microstructures (pages 61–67)

      Yu Zhu, Xiaoyong Hu, Yongyang Huang, Hong Yang and Qihuang Gong

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201200025

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      A fast and low-power all-optical tunable Fano resonance in a plasmonic microstructure made of gold and polycrystalline LiNbO3 is realized by combining strong quantum confinement enhancing nonlinearity and near-resonant excitation enhancing nonlinearity. The operating pump intensity is reduced by four orders of magnitude, while a fast response time on the order of a hundred picoseconds and a large tunability are maintained.

    3. Colorimetric Plasmon Resonance Imaging Using Nano Lycurgus Cup Arrays (pages 68–76)

      Manas Ranjan Gartia, Austin Hsiao, Anusha Pokhriyal, Sujin Seo, Gulsim Kulsharova, Brian T. Cunningham, Tiziana C. Bond and Gang Logan Liu

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201200040

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      A large-area high-density nanoscale Lycurgus cup array is created with 100 times better sensitivity than any other reported nanoplasmonic device. With this device, nanoplasmonic spectroscopy sensing, for the first time, becomes colorimetric sensing requiring only the naked eye or ordinary visible color photography.

  12. FRONTISPIECE

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      Iron Pyrite: Iron Pyrite (FeS2) Broad Spectral and Magnetically Responsive Photodetectors (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2013) (page 77)

      Maogang Gong, Alec Kirkeminde, Yu Xie, Rongtao Lu, Jianwei Liu, Judy Z. Wu and Shenqiang Ren

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370008

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      Earth abundant broad spectral iron pyrite (fool's gold) nanocrystals are shown by S. Ren and co-workers on page 78 to have great potential in magnetic field responsive photosensing applications

  13. FULL PAPERS

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    1. Iron Pyrite (FeS2) Broad Spectral and Magnetically Responsive Photodetectors (pages 78–83)

      Maogang Gong, Alec Kirkeminde, Yu Xie, Rongtao Lu, Jianwei Liu, Judy Z. Wu and Shenqiang Ren

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201200003

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      Earth-abundant broad spectral iron pyrite (FeS2) nanocrystals show great potential in photosensing applications. Tunable photocurrent is observed under the magnetic field effect due to an interdiffusion-controlled diluted magnetic semiconductor phase.

    2. Optically Reconfigurable Reflective/Scattering States Enabled with Photosensitive Cholesteric Liquid Crystal Cells (pages 84–91)

      Jonathan P. Vernon, Uladzimir A. Hrozhyk, Svetlana V. Serak, Vincent P. Tondiglia, Timothy J. White, Nelson V. Tabiryan and Timothy J. Bunning

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201200014

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      An optically rewritable/reconfigurable patterning method is reported. Circularly polarized (CP) light is employed to write information into cholesteric liquid crystal cells fabricated with a photoaligning boundary layer. Macroscopic scattering areas, patterned via CP light, can be reconfigured into a new pattern by erasing (i.e., returning cell to reflective state) with linearly polarized (LP) light and writing a new pattern with CP light.

    3. Water-Soluble Conjugated Polymers for Simultaneous Two-Photon Cell Imaging and Two-Photon Photodynamic Therapy (pages 92–99)

      Xiaoqin Shen, Lin Li, Agnes Chow Min Chan, Nengyue Gao, Shao Q. Yao and Qing-Hua Xu

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201200026

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      A series of water-soluble conjugated polymers with large two-photon absorption cross section are synthesized. PFVCN is found to display high fluorescence brightness and a high singlet oxygen generation capability under two-photon excitation. Its potential application as a promising agent for simultaneous two-photon imaging and two-photon photodynamic therapy are demonstrated.

    4. Macroscopic Self-Assembly and Optical Characterization of Nanoparticle–Ligand Metamaterials (pages 100–106)

      Jake Fontana, Jawad Naciri, Ronald Rendell and Banahalli R. Ratna

      Version of Record online: 31 JAN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201200039

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      Self-assembly of macroscopic gold nanosphere–ligand films is demonstrated to produce optical metamaterials. Using phase separation and surface tension gradients nanoparticles are capped with thiol ligands, self-assembled into macroscopic monolayers and transported onto non-functionalized substrates. By measuring the real and imaginary parts of the phase shift of light transmitted through the self-assembled films a positive near-zero index of refraction at visible wavelengths is demonstrated.

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