Advanced Optical Materials

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 7

July 2013

Volume 1, Issue 7

Pages 471–533

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispieces
    8. Full Papers
    1. Nanorods: Self-Assembly of Au@Ag Nanorods Mediated by Gemini Surfactants for Highly Efficient SERS-Active Supercrystals (Advanced Optical Materials 7/2013) (page 471)

      Sergio Gómez-Graña, Jorge Pérez-Juste, Ramón A. Alvarez-Puebla, Andrés Guerrero-Martínez and Luis M. Liz-Marzán

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370042

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      A silver coating takes the lead in the SERS enhancement contest for nanorod supercrystals. On page 477, A. Guerrero-Martínez, L. M. Liz-Marzán, and co-workers determine that supercrystals based on standing core–shell gold–silver nanorods stabilized by gemini surfactants are the SERS champions, knocking out their gold nanorod supercrystal counterparts. After a tough competition, silver substrates show a perfect combination of high optical activity and large homogeneous sensing area that will be difficult to defeat.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispieces
    8. Full Papers
    1. Chiral Structures: Manipulation of Asymmetric Transmission in Planar Chiral Nanostructures by Anisotropic Loss (Advanced Optical Materials 7/2013) (page 472)

      Zhaofeng Li, Mutlu Gokkavas and Ekmel Ozbay

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370043

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      Asymmetric transmissions of circularly polarized optical waves can be achieved when the waves are incident normal to planar chiral structures, provided that the structures are anisotropic and lossy. In order to clarify how the factor of loss affects the asymmetric transmission, Z. Li, M. Gokkavas, and E. Ozbay studied a typical planar chiral structure by using an optical lumped element model. On page 482, they found that the anisotropy of loss, instead of the whole loss, plays a crucial role for achieving asymmetric transmission.

  3. Masthead

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispieces
    8. Full Papers
    1. Masthead: (Advanced Optical Materials 7/2013)

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370045

  4. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispieces
    8. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Advanced Optical Materials 7/2013) (pages 473–476)

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370044

  5. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispieces
    8. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Self-Assembly of Au@Ag Nanorods Mediated by Gemini Surfactants for Highly Efficient SERS-Active Supercrystals (pages 477–481)

      Sergio Gómez-Graña, Jorge Pérez-Juste, Ramón A. Alvarez-Puebla, Andrés Guerrero-Martínez and Luis M. Liz-Marzán

      Article first published online: 22 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300162

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      The fabrication of supercrystals of standing core–shell gold–silver nanorods stabilized by gemini surfactants provides SERS substrates with high optical activity, large homogenous sensing areas, and the potential to maximize the SERS signal with respect to their gold nanorod supercrystal counterparts.

    2. Manipulation of Asymmetric Transmission in Planar Chiral Nanostructures by Anisotropic Loss (pages 482–488)

      Zhaofeng Li, Mutlu Gokkavas and Ekmel Ozbay

      Article first published online: 17 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300183

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Planar chiral structures may provide asymmetric transmission for circularly polarized optical waves at normal incidence if the structures are anisotropic and lossy, but the role of loss has not yet been clarified. Here, a typical planar chiral structure is studied, and the mechanism of asymmetric transmission is analyzed. It is demonstrated for the first time that asymmetric transmission can be manipulated by changing the anisotropy of loss.

    3. You have free access to this content
      Broadband and Efficient Diffraction (pages 489–493)

      Céline Ribot, Mane-Si Laure Lee, Stéphane Collin, Shailendra Bansropun, Patrick Plouhinec, Didier Thenot, Simone Cassette, Brigitte Loiseaux and Philippe Lalanne

      Article first published online: 8 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300215

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      By exploiting the highly chromatic behavior of semiconductor structures with mesoscopic dimensions only slightly smaller than the wavelength, efficient diffraction is maintained over almost one octave.

  6. Frontispieces

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispieces
    8. Full Papers
    1. Left-Handed Materials: Three-Dimensional Super Lens Composed of Fractal Left-Handed Materials (Advanced Optical Materials 7/2013) (page 494)

      He-Xiu Xu, Guang-Ming Wang, Mei Qing Qi, Lianming Li and Tie Jun Cui

      Article first published online: 25 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370046

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      A 3D super lens composed of fractal left-handed materials is realized by H.-X. Xu, T. J. Cui, and co-workers. By incorporating four interdigital capacitors in the Sierpinski fractal curves of the second iteration order, the left-handed transmission-line material facilitates an electrically small dimension and a broadband negative magnetic response. Based on such metamaterials, a planar slab super lens is designed and fabricated on page 495. Both numerical and experimental results illustrate that the superlens exhibits excellent impedance matching to free space and significantly improves the imaging resolution.

  7. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Masthead
    5. Contents
    6. Communications
    7. Frontispieces
    8. Full Papers
    1. Three-Dimensional Super Lens Composed of Fractal Left-Handed Materials (pages 495–502)

      He-Xiu Xu, Guang-Ming Wang, Mei Qing Qi, Lianming Li and Tie Jun Cui

      Article first published online: 10 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300023

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A three-dimensional free-space super lens made of left-handed materials is presented, in which a new strategy is proposed to design broadband and compact left-handed materials by incorporating the fractal concept into the design. Experimental results show that the super lens breaks the diffraction limit and affords subwavelength spatial details.

    2. Characterizing the Electroluminescence Emission from a Strongly Coupled Organic Semiconductor Microcavity LED (pages 503–509)

      Nikolaos Christogiannis, Niccolo Somaschi, Paolo Michetti, David M. Coles, Pavlos G. Savvidis, Pavlos G. Lagoudakis and David G. Lidzey

      Article first published online: 28 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300017

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      A strongly-coupled organic microcavity light-emitting diode is fabricated using a distributed Bragg reflector as one of the cavity mirrors. The device is characterized with electroluminescence, photoluminescence, and time-resolved measurements, and the efficiency is compared to that of a weakly-coupled device. A theoretical treatment of polariton formation is used to explain the lower efficiency of the polariton device.

    3. Topological Control of Porous Silicon Photonic Crystals by Microcontact Printing (pages 510–516)

      Anne M. Ruminski, Giuseppe Barillaro, Emilie Secret, Winnie D. Huang, Andrea Potocny, Ulysse Carion, Charles Wertans and Michael J. Sailor

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300014

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      Conformal etching of 3D porous photonic structures into silicon. When a silicon wafer containing a surface relief grating is etched with the appropriate anodic electrochemical waveform, a photonic multilayer results that is conformal with the undulations of the silicon surface. The structure displays both diffraction and an optical stop band. The 3D porous structure can be removed, preserving the surface relief through at least 6 generations of electrochemical etch.

    4. Reversible Three-Dimensional Focusing of Visible Light with Ultrathin Plasmonic Flat Lens (pages 517–521)

      Xianzhong Chen, Lingling Huang, Holger Mühlenbernd, Guixin Li, Benfeng Bai, Qiaofeng Tan, Guofan Jin, Cheng-Wei Qiu, Thomas Zentgraf and Shuang Zhang

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300102

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      A metalens for visible light is composed of dipole antennas arranged in a number of evenly spaced concentric rings, with the radius of the rings increasing by a step size of 400 nm. The focusing properties of this metalens can be switched between a convex lens and a concave lens by controlling the helicity of the incident light.

    5. Surface Plasmon-Enhanced Third Harmonic Generation from Gold–Polymer Hybrid Plasmonic Crystal (pages 522–526)

      Shumei Chen, Winghan Wong, Yuebun Pun, Kokwai Cheah and Guixin Li

      Article first published online: 26 MAY 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300144

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      A nonlinear optical plasmonic crystal is designed by integrating an organic active medium with a large optical nonlinearity into a conventional plasmonic nanostructure. The surface plasmon-enhanced third harmonic generation (THG) from the metal–organic hybrid plasmonic crystal is experimentally demonstrated. The metal–organic hybrid configuration provides new concepts to develop novel nonlinear optical devices with subwavelength electromagnetic-wave confinement.

    6. Azobenzene Lasers Tuned Over a 200 nm Range (pages 527–533)

      Leonid M. Goldenberg, Victor Lisinetskii and Sigurd Schrader

      Article first published online: 26 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300195

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      Introduction of different laser dyes into an azobenzene oligomeric system leads to the ability to inscribe short period surface relief gratings. The gratings serve as distributed feedback for miniature laser devices emitting in the 1st and 2nd diffraction orders with a tunability over 200 nm. The devices afford up to a few tens of thousands of pulses.

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