Advanced Optical Materials

Cover image for Vol. 1 Issue 8

August 2013

Volume 1, Issue 8

Pages 537–599

  1. Cover Picture

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispieces
    9. Full Papers
    1. Liquid Sensing: Spoof Plasmon Surfaces: A Novel Platform for THz Sensing (Advanced Optical Materials 8/2013) (page 537)

      Binghao Ng, Jianfeng Wu, Stephen M. Hanham, Antonio I. Fernández-Domínguez, Norbert Klein, Yun Fook Liew, Mark B. H. Breese, Minghui Hong and Stefan A. Maier

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370047

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      An Otto prism coupling setup with a spoof plasmon surface underneath is the centerpiece of work by S. A. Maier and co-workers, in which terahertz liquid sensing with figures-of-merit as high as 49 are demonstrated. On page 543, water molecules are shown to go onto the spoof plasmon surface, which consists of linear arrays of subwavelength grooves, tightly confining the spoof plasmons. The plasmons are sensitive to the refractive index of the dielectric filling the grooves, and phase jumps at spoof plasmon resonances provide the readout response.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispieces
    9. Full Papers
    1. Plasmonics: Metal–Dielectric Core–Shell Nanoparticles: Advanced Plasmonic Architectures Towards Multiple Control of Random Lasers (Advanced Optical Materials 8/2013) (page 538)

      Xiangeng Meng, Koji Fujita, Yusuke Moriguchi, Yanhua Zong and Katsuhisa Tanaka

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370048

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      Metal–dielectric core–shell nanoparticles serve as robust platforms for control of light-matter interactions via chemically accessible tunability of the dielectric shell thickness. Now X. Meng, K. Fujita, et al. have applied such platforms to the area of random lasers, and on page 573 they demonstrate control of lasing in terms of pump threshold, output power, lasing spikiness, and mode interactions by varying the shell thickness. This plasmonic approach opens up new avenues towards well-controlled random lasers.

  3. Back Cover

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    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
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    7. Communications
    8. Frontispieces
    9. Full Papers
    1. Fluorescence Quenching: Size- and Shape-Dependent Fluorescence Quenching of Gold Nanoparticles on Perylene Dye (Advanced Optical Materials 8/2013) (page 602)

      Chenming Xue, Yuhua Xue, Liming Dai, Augustine Urbas and Quan Li

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370052

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      When gold nanoparticles meet strongly fluorescent dye molecules, the fluorescence of the molecules is quenched. On page 581, organo-soluble thiol monolayer-protected gold nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes are homogeneously mixed with perylene dye molecules by Q. Li and co-workers, in both solution and solid states. The nanoparticles modify the fluorescence properties of perylene depending on the particle size and shape. This demonstrates the potential to introduce gold nanoparticles into practical applications such as antifraud technologies.

  4. Masthead

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    5. Masthead
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    1. Masthead: (Advanced Optical Materials 8/2013)

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370050

  5. Contents

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispieces
    9. Full Papers
    1. Contents: (Advanced Optical Materials 8/2013) (pages 539–542)

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370049

  6. Communications

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispieces
    9. Full Papers
    1. You have free access to this content
      Spoof Plasmon Surfaces: A Novel Platform for THz Sensing (pages 543–548)

      Binghao Ng, Jianfeng Wu, Stephen M. Hanham, Antonio I. Fernández-Domínguez, Norbert Klein, Yun Fook Liew, Mark B. H. Breese, Minghui Hong and Stefan A. Maier

      Article first published online: 7 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300146

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Spoof plasmon surfaces consisting of linear arrays of subwavelength grooves are proposed as a novel platform for THz sensing. The tightly confined spoof plasmons, coupled via an Otto prism setup, are sensitive to the refractive index of the dielectric filling the grooves. Phase jumps at spoof plasmon resonances are used as a readout response for refractive index sensing. An overall sensitivity of 0.49 THz RIU−1 with figures-of-merit as high as 49 are achieved.

    2. Highly Fluorescent Dye-Aggregate-Enhanced Energy-Transfer Nanoparticles for Neuronal Cell Imaging (pages 549–553)

      Xinyang Li, Huijing Liu, Xingxing Sun, Guoqiang Bi and Guoqing Zhang

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300173

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      Dye aggregates give energy transfer a boost! Efficient energy transfer between organoboron and Rhodamine dyes are utilized to produce two-photon excitable polylactide nanoparticles, which exhibit high brightness and photostability. These ‘super-bright’ nanoparticles are particularly suited for imaging sensitive specimens such as live neuronal cells. Tissue imaging is also demonstrated, to show that such new imaging agents can find various applications for life sciences.

    3. Is There Real Upconversion Photoluminescence from Graphene Quantum Dots? (pages 554–558)

      Zhixing Gan, Xinglong Wu, Gengxia Zhou, Jiancang Shen and Paul K. Chu

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300152

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      Upconversion photoluminescence (PL) from graphene quantum dots (GQDs) excited by a xenon lamp is artificial. It is essentially excited by the second-order diffraction light of wavelength λ/2 co-existing in the red light. Real upconversion PL from GQDs is observed under excitation with a femtosecond pulsed laser, implying that coherent photons with high enough power density can be upconverted into blue light via GQDs.

    4. Dynamic Manipulation of Infrared Radiation with MEMS Metamaterials (pages 559–562)

      Xianliang Liu and Willie J. Padilla

      Article first published online: 18 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300163

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      An electrically tunable MEMS metamaterial that effectively manipulates radiation in the mid-infrared wavelength range is experimentally demonstrated. The metamaterial consists of an array of suspended metal-dielectric elements above a metal ground plane on a carrier substrate. A voltage applied between the metallic metamaterial array and the bottom ground plane layer permits adjustment of the distance between them, thus greatly altering the electromagnetic properties.

    5. You have full text access to this OnlineOpen article
      Low-Threshold Nanoimprinted Lasers Using Substructured Gratings for Control of Distributed Feedback (pages 563–566)

      Emiliano R. Martins, Yue Wang, Alexander L. Kanibolotsky, Peter J. Skabara, Graham A. Turnbull and Ifor D. W. Samuel

      Article first published online: 2 JUL 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300211

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      A nanopatterned polymer design for lasers using substructured gratings to achieve low threshold lasing is presented. The approach provides complete control over the balance between optical feedback and output coupling. Polymer lasers are fabricated by nanoimprint lithography with threshold densities as low as 16 W cm-2, half that of reference distributed feedback lasers with conventional gratings.

  7. Frontispieces

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispieces
    9. Full Papers
    1. Silica Nanostructures: Shrink-Induced Silica Structures for Far-field Fluorescence Enhancements (Advanced Optical Materials 8/2013) (page 567)

      Sophia Lin, Himanshu Sharma and Michelle Khine

      Article first published online: 21 AUG 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201370051

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      Multi-scale silica structures serve as a sensing platform for enhanced biomolecule detection. The structures are fabricated by M. Khine and co-workers on page 568, by depositing a thin silica layer onto shrink-wrap, a pre-stressed polymer, film. The stiffness mismatch between the materials upon shrinking in an oven induces silica micro- and nanostructures that yield robust far-field fluorescence enhancements of attached biomolecules.

  8. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Communications
    8. Frontispieces
    9. Full Papers
    1. Shrink-Induced Silica Structures for Far-field Fluorescence Enhancements (pages 568–572)

      Sophia Lin, Himanshu Sharma and Michelle Khine

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300180

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Rough silica structures on thermoplastic shrink films result in robust far-field fluorescence enhancements of linked biomolecules. Increased signal-to-noise ratio and detection sensitivity is achieved. The enhanced fluorescence signal arises from simply concentrating and encapsulating bound fluorophores.

    2. Metal–Dielectric Core–Shell Nanoparticles: Advanced Plasmonic Architectures Towards Multiple Control of Random Lasers (pages 573–580)

      Xiangeng Meng, Koji Fujita, Yusuke Moriguchi, Yanhua Zong and Katsuhisa Tanaka

      Article first published online: 25 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300153

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A plasmonic approach to control figures of merit for a random laser is developed. Using gold–silica core–shell nanoparticles, the coupling between the metal and fluorophores can be tailored with the shell thickness. As a result, random lasing properties such as lasing spikiness, pump threshold, and mode interactions can be manipulated.

    3. Size- and Shape-Dependent Fluorescence Quenching of Gold Nanoparticles on Perylene Dye (pages 581–587)

      Chenming Xue, Yuhua Xue, Liming Dai, Augustine Urbas and Quan Li

      Article first published online: 27 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300175

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Gold nanoparticles of different shapes and sizes are homogenously mixed with strong fluorescent perylene dye molecules in both solution and solid states, where the strong perylene fluorescence is quenched. When the smallest spherical gold nanoparticles are dropped on the perylene soaked paper followed by drying and sealing in a polydimethylsiloxane film, that area shows a black spot under UV light but appears visually identical to the surrounding area under daylight.

    4. Amplified Spontaneous Emission in Pentathienoacene Dioxides by Direct Optical Pump and by Energy Transfer: Correlation with Photophysical Parameters (pages 588–599)

      Juan Casado, Víctor Hernández, Juan T. López Navarrete, Manuel Algarra, Demetrio A. da Silva Filho, Shigehiro Yamaguchi, Raquel Rondão, J. Sérgio Seixas de Melo, Víctor Navarro-Fuster, Pedro G. Boj and María A. Díaz-García

      Article first published online: 21 JUN 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300155

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Tuning amplified spontaneous emissions of organic dyes by isomeric mixtures of pentathienoacene and dioxide pentathienoacenes is achieved to design new lasing materials. The intense synergy effect between structurally familiar molecules is an old chemical concept that can be exploited here to efficiently promote energy exchange and lasing. A full understanding of the underlying photophysical mechanisms is provided.

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