Advanced Optical Materials

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 1

January 2014

Volume 2, Issue 1

Pages 1–99

  1. Cover Picture

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    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Full Papers
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      Live Cell Imaging: Extraordinary Transmission-based Plasmonic Nanoarrays for Axially Super-Resolved Cell Imaging (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2014) (page 1)

      Jong-ryul Choi, Kyujung Kim, Youngjin Oh, Ah Leum Kim, Sook Young Kim, Jeon-Soo Shin and Donghyun Kim

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470001

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      Extraordinary transmission-based axial imaging (EOT-AIM) is developed for cell microscopy by J.-S. Shin, D. Kim, and co-workers, in which localization by nanoaperture arrays performs near-field sampling of target fluorescence up to a preset axial distance. EOT-AIM achieves an axial super-resolution as small as 20 nm for a depth range of 500 nm. On page 48, the measurement of intracellular cholera toxin subunit B conjugated with FITC successfully confirms that both the resolution and the axial imaging range are improved significantly as compared to conventional methods.

  2. Inside Front Cover

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Full Papers
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      Spectral Shaping: Shaping the Emission Spectral Profile of Quantum Dots with Periodic Dielectric and Metallic Nanostructures (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2014) (page 2)

      Zhang-Kai Zhou, Dang Yuan Lei, Jiaming Liu, Xin Liu, Jiancai Xue, Qiangzhong Zhu, Huanjun Chen, Tianran Liu, Yinyin Li, Hongbo Zhang and Xuehua Wang

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470002

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      H. J. Chen, X. H. Wang, and co-workers report shaping the emission spectral profile of quantum dots using the anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) templates. On page 56, the AAO templates are shown to exhibit rich Fabry–Pérot interferences, which can significantly modulate the photoluminescence spectral profiles of the adjacent semiconductor quantum dots. Aside from the spectral modification, a large photoluminescence enhancement of the quantum dots is observed after loading the AAO templates with metallic nanowires sustaining plasmonic resonances.

  3. Back Cover

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    4. Back Cover
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    10. Communications
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      Photonic Crystals: Inkjet Printing Patterned Photonic Crystal Domes for Wide Viewing-Angle Displays by Controlling the Sliding Three Phase Contact Line (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2014) (page 102)

      Minxuan Kuang, Jingxia Wang, Bin Bao, Fengyu Li, Libin Wang, Lei Jiang and Yanlin Song

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470007

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      Y. Song and co-workers fabricate patterned photonic crystal domes with angle-independent photonic bandgaps. The domes are created by inkjet printing droplets with a controlled sliding three-phase contact line. On page 34, these photonic crystal domes exhibit enhanced brightness of over 40 times and a wide viewing-angle from 0° to 180° when fluorescence molecules are incorporated, which is very desirable for display pixels.

  4. Masthead

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      Masthead: (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2014)

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470006

  5. Contents

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    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
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    10. Communications
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  6. Editorial

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      1st Anniversary for Advanced Optical Materials (pages 8–9)

      Peter Gregory, Guido Fuchs, Eva Rittweger and Anja Eberhardt

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300507

  7. Progress Reports

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    1. Photoreduction of Graphene Oxides: Methods, Properties, and Applications (pages 10–28)

      Yong-Lai Zhang, Li Guo, Hong Xia, Qi-Dai Chen, Jing Feng and Hong-Bo Sun

      Version of Record online: 24 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300317

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      Photoreduction of graphene oxide (GO) has emerged as a promising method for both the preparation of graphene-like materials and the fabrication of graphene-based devices. In this progress report, the recent development of the photoreduction of GO is highlighted, including photothermal, photochemical, and laser reduction. The unique properties and related applications are briefly summarized.

  8. Frontispiece

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    3. Inside Front Cover
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    6. Contents
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      Vanadium Dioxide: Distinct Length Scales in the VO2 Metal–Insulator Transition Revealed by Bi-chromatic Optical Probing (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2014) (page 29)

      Lei Wang, Irina Novikova, John M. Klopf, Scott Madaras, Gwyn P. Williams, Eric Madaras, Jiwei Lu, Stuart A. Wolf and Rosa A. Lukaszew

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470004

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      Vanadium dioxide exhibits a thermally induced metalinsulator transition near room temperature. Metallic puddles nucleate and coarsen, embedded in the insulating matrix. The coexistence of these two phases spans distinct length scales as their relative domain sizes change. On page 30, using far-field optical probing at very different frequencies, R. A. Lukaszew and co-workers are able to follow the dynamic evolution of these phases across the transition.

  9. Communications

    1. Top of page
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    6. Contents
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    12. Full Papers
    1. Distinct Length Scales in the VO2 Metal–Insulator Transition Revealed by Bi-chromatic Optical Probing (pages 30–33)

      Lei Wang, Irina Novikova, John M. Klopf, Scott Madaras, Gwyn P. Williams, Eric Madaras, Jiwei Lu, Stuart A. Wolf and Rosa A. Lukaszew

      Version of Record online: 27 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300333

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      Upon a heating-induced metal–instulator transition (MIT) in VO2, microscopic metallic VO2 puddles nucleate and coarsen within the insulating matrix. This coexistence of the two phases across the transition spans distinct length scales as their relative domain sizes change. Far-field optical probing is applied to follow the dynamic evolution of the highly correlated metallic domains as the MIT progresses.

    2. Inkjet Printing Patterned Photonic Crystal Domes for Wide Viewing-Angle Displays by Controlling the Sliding Three Phase Contact Line (pages 34–38)

      Minxuan Kuang, Jingxia Wang, Bin Bao, Fengyu Li, Libin Wang, Lei Jiang and Yanlin Song

      Version of Record online: 8 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300369

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Patterned photonic crystal (PC) domes with angle-independent photonic bandgaps are fabricated by inkjet printing droplets with controlled sliding three phase contact lines. Enhanced brightness over 40 times and a wide viewing-angle from 0° to 180° are easily achieved by incorporating fluorescent molecules into the PC domes, which is very desirable for display pixels. These results will be of great significance for the development of flexible, wide viewing-angle displays.

  10. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Full Papers
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      Nonlinear Optics: Efficient Energy Transfer under Two-Photon Excitation in a 3D, Supramolecular, Zn(II)-Coordinated, Self-Assembled Organic Network (Advanced Optical Materials 1/2014) (page 39)

      Tingchao He, Rui Chen, Zheng Bang Lim, Deepa Rajwar, Lin Ma, Yue Wang, Yuan Gao, Andrew C. Grimsdale and Handong Sun

      Version of Record online: 13 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470005

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      H. Sun and co-workers demonstrate a novel 3D two-photon-type light-harvesting system which may be directly used for in vivo bioimaging and nonlinear optical devices. As shown on page 40, two-photon excited Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) is exploited to enhance the solid-state fluorescence of a supramolecular centre (acceptor) in an artificial 3D metal-organic complex (MLC), in which a 3D Zn(II)-coordinated tetrahedral core is utilized as the donor.

  11. Full Papers

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
    4. Back Cover
    5. Masthead
    6. Contents
    7. Editorial
    8. Progress Reports
    9. Frontispiece
    10. Communications
    11. Frontispiece
    12. Full Papers
    1. Efficient Energy Transfer under Two-Photon Excitation in a 3D, Supramolecular, Zn(II)-Coordinated, Self-Assembled Organic Network (pages 40–47)

      Tingchao He, Rui Chen, Zheng Bang Lim, Deepa Rajwar, Lin Ma, Yue Wang, Yuan Gao, Andrew C. Grimsdale and Handong Sun

      Version of Record online: 30 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300407

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      Efficient energy transfer properties are explored in a 3D supramolecular Zn(II)-coordinated, self-assembled organic network. Owing to the dedicatedly designed two-photon absorbing donor, this system displays efficient energy transfer, enhanced two-photon excited fluorescence, and excellent photostability in the solid state, which makes it a very promising material for in vivo bioimaging and solid-state nonlinear optical devices.

    2. Extraordinary Transmission-based Plasmonic Nanoarrays for Axially Super-Resolved Cell Imaging (pages 48–55)

      Jong-ryul Choi, Kyujung Kim, Youngjin Oh, Ah Leum Kim, Sook Young Kim, Jeon-Soo Shin and Donghyun Kim

      Version of Record online: 2 OCT 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300330

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Extraordinary transmission-based axial imaging (EOT-AIM) for cell microscopy is reported. EOT-AIM uses arrays of nanoapertures which sample target fluorescence up to a preset axial distance. EOT-AIM achieves an axial super-resolution as small as 20 nm for a depth range of 500 nm. Experiments performed for the measurement of intracellular cholera toxin subunit B successfully confirm the results.

    3. Shaping the Emission Spectral Profile of Quantum Dots with Periodic Dielectric and Metallic Nanostructures (pages 56–64)

      Zhang-Kai Zhou, Dang Yuan Lei, Jiaming Liu, Xin Liu, Jiancai Xue, Qiangzhong Zhu, Huanjun Chen, Tianran Liu, Yinyin Li, Hongbo Zhang and Xuehua Wang

      Version of Record online: 13 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300354

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      Anodic aluminum oxide templates are demonstrated to shape the photoluminescence spectral profile of adjacent semiconductor quantum dots.

    4. Growth of Monodisperse Gold Nanospheres with Diameters from 20 nm to 220 nm and Their Core/Satellite Nanostructures (pages 65–73)

      Qifeng Ruan, Lei Shao, Yiwei Shu, Jianfang Wang and Hongkai Wu

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300359

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      Colloidal gold nanospheres of narrow size distributions are prepared by a simple wet-chemistry method. Their average diameters are controlled over a large range. They are successfully assembled into core/satellite nanostructures, which exhibit attractive local electric field enhancements and therefore remarkable Raman scattering performances, as revealed by both experiment and theory.

    5. Plasmonic Gradient Effects on High Vacuum Tip-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (pages 74–80)

      Mengtao Sun, Zhenglong Zhang, Li Chen, Shaoxiang Sheng and Hongxing Xu

      Version of Record online: 22 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300296

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      Plasmonic gradient effects are experimentally revealed by tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy. Experimental “additional Raman peaks” are molecular IR-active modes enhanced by electric field gradients. The ratio of Raman intensities over IR-active modes is determined by the ratio of electric field intensity over electric field gradient intensity. This method rationally interprets “additional Raman peaks” and extended applications for ultrasensitive spectral analysis on the nanoscale.

    6. Extraction Length Determination in Patterned Luminescent Sol–Gel Films (pages 81–87)

      Lucie Devys, Géraldine Dantelle, Amélie Revaux, Viacheslav Kubytskyi, Daniel Paget, Henri Benisty and Thierry Gacoin

      Version of Record online: 24 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300304

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      Direct method for the quantitative evaluation of light extraction length is presented in the case of luminescent sol–gel films patterned with a 2D photonic structure. This allows quantifying of the extraction by the photonic structure as compared to other uncontrolled pathways such as scattering from defects in the film coating. Results are discussed through the study of the pattern depth dependence of extraction.

    7. Random Lasing with a High Quality Factor over the Whole Visible Range Based on Cascade Energy Transfer (pages 88–93)

      Xiaoyu Shi, Yanrong Wang, Zhaona Wang, Sujun Wei, Yanyan Sun, Dahe Liu, Jing Zhou, Yongyi Zhang and Jinwei Shi

      Version of Record online: 2 DEC 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300299

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      Low threshold coherent random lasing with a high quality factor (∼13 000) over the whole visible range is experimentally observed using gold–silver bimetallic porous nanowires with abundant nanogaps as the scatterers. Multi gain media can provide broad tunability of the emission wavelength when the system is pumped by single-wavelength laser pulses.

    8. ZnO Nanorods with Broadband Antireflective Properties for Improved Light Management in Silicon Thin-Film Solar Cells (pages 94–99)

      Regina-Elisabeth Nowak, Martin Vehse, Oleg Sergeev, Tobias Voss, Moritz Seyfried, Karsten von Maydell and Carsten Agert

      Version of Record online: 27 NOV 2013 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300455

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      ZnO nanorod arrays are a promising light management concept for photovoltaic devices due to their excellent antireflective properties. Grown by electrochemical deposition, a cost-effective process allowing a large range of structure sizes, they have the potential to replace standard light management concepts in solar cells.

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