Advanced Optical Materials

Cover image for Vol. 2 Issue 4

April 2014

Volume 2, Issue 4

Pages 303–399

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      Plasmonics: Ultracompact Chip-Integrated Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in a Single Plasmonic Composite Nanocavity (Advanced Optical Materials 4/2014) (page 303)

      Zhen Chai, Xiaoyong Hu, Yu Zhu, Sibai Sun, Hong Yang and Qihuang Gong

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470020

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      An ultracompact chip-integrated electromagnetically induced transparency is realized in a single plasmonic composite nanocavity directly in plasmonic circuits by X. Hu, H. Gong, and co-workers. On page 320, a small lateral dimension of 600 nm is obtained for the composite nanocavity, which is reduced by one order of magnitude compared with previous reports. A large shift of 490 nm in the transparency window center is obtained through covering with a poly(methyl methacrylate) layer.

  2. Inside Front Cover

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      Transparent Electrodes: ZnO/Polyfluorene Hybrid LED on an Efficient Hole-Transport Layer of Graphene Oxide and Transparent Graphene Electrode (Advanced Optical Materials 4/2014) (page 304)

      Kamran ul Hasan, Mats O. Sandberg, Omer Nur and Magnus Willander

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470021

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      An rGO/GO/PFO/ZnO/Al LED is fabricated via simple solution-based techniques by K. ul Hasan Hasan et al. On page 326, they show how graphene can be a simple solution-processable substitute to PEDOT:PSS as an effective holetransport (electron-blocking) layer, and ITO as a transparent conductive electrode in optoelectronic devices. The wide emission range of this LED opens up prospects for demonstrating white light-emitting devices from this novel combination. This could pave the way for cheaper displays.

  3. Back Cover

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      Class Ceramics: Tuneable Nanostructuring of Highly Transparent Zinc Gallogermanate Glasses and Glass-Ceramics (Advanced Optical Materials 4/2014) (page 402)

      Sébastien Chenu, Emmanuel Véron, Cécile Genevois, Guy Matzen, Thierry Cardinal, Auriane Etienne, Dominique Massiot and Mathieu Allix

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470026

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      Highly transparent nanostructured gallogermanatebased glass and glass-ceramic materials are reported on page 364 by M. Allix and co-workers. These materials present nanoscale phase separations, whose size can be tailored depending on the nominal composition. The large variety of accessible compositions combined with precise control of the nanostructure offer a great opportunity to design new highly transparent nanostructured materials with a wide range of tuneable optical properties both in the visible and the infrared ranges.

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      Masthead: (Advanced Optical Materials 4/2014)

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470025

  5. Contents

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      Contents: (Advanced Optical Materials 4/2014) (pages 305–309)

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470022

  6. Comments

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    1. Comment on “A Broadband Negative Index Metamaterial at Optical Frequencies” (pages 310–312)

      Chris Fietz

      Article first published online: 3 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300378

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      Atre et al. recently presented a design for a new metamaterial which they claimed had two ‘broadband negative index’ bands. This comment shows that, when characterized correctly, the metamaterial in question has no such negative index bands. This is demonstrated with two different characterization methods.

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      Photodetectors: Silicon-Based Visible-Blind Ultraviolet Detection and Imaging Using Down-Shifting Luminophores (Advanced Optical Materials 4/2014) (page 313)

      Xing Sheng, Cunjiang Yu, Viktor Malyarchuk, Yu-Heng Lee, Seungho Kim, Taehwan Kim, Ling Shen, Chris Horng, Jordan Lutz, Noel C. Giebink, Jongwook Park and John A. Rogers

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470023

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      J. A. Rogers and co-workers exploit a design for visible-blind ultraviolet detection using silicon photodiodes and down-shifting luminophores. The fabricated device exhibits a selective UV response between 300 nm and 360 nm, which exceeds that in the visible range by about 103. An array of such detectors demonstrates the potential for using these structures in UV imagers, and suggests compatibility with large-area, CMOS-compatible Si electronics and photonics.

  8. Communications

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    1. Silicon-Based Visible-Blind Ultraviolet Detection and Imaging Using Down-Shifting Luminophores (pages 314–319)

      Xing Sheng, Cunjiang Yu, Viktor Malyarchuk, Yu-Heng Lee, Seungho Kim, Taehwan Kim, Ling Shen, Chris Horng, Jordan Lutz, Noel C. Giebink, Jongwook Park and John A. Rogers

      Article first published online: 27 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300475

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A visible-blind UV detector design combining conventional silicon photodiodes with down-shifting luminophores in a light trapping configuration enables a response in a selective spectral band between 300 nm and 360 nm. An array of such detectors demonstrates the potential for using these structures in UV imagers, and suggests compatibility with large-area, CMOS-compatible Si electronics and photonics.

    2. Ultracompact Chip-Integrated Electromagnetically Induced Transparency in a Single Plasmonic Composite Nanocavity (pages 320–325)

      Zhen Chai, Xiaoyong Hu, Yu Zhu, Sibai Sun, Hong Yang and Qihuang Gong

      Article first published online: 6 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300497

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      Ultracompact chip-integrated electromagnetically induced transparency is realized in a single plasmonic composite nanocavity in plasmonic circuits directly. A small lateral dimension of 600 nm is obtained for the composite nanocavity, which is reduced by one order of magnitude compared with previous reports. A large shift of 490 nm in the transparency window center is obtained through covering poly(methyl methacrylate) layer.

    3. ZnO/Polyfluorene Hybrid LED on an Efficient Hole-Transport Layer of Graphene Oxide and Transparent Graphene Electrode (pages 326–330)

      Kamran ul Hasan, Mats O. Sandberg, Omer Nur and Magnus Willander

      Article first published online: 9 JAN 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300412

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      An rGO/GO/PFO/ZnO/Al LED is fabricated by simple solution-based techniques. The results indicate that graphene can be a simple solution-processable substitute to PEDOT:PSS as an effective hole-transport (electron-blocking) layer and ITO as a transparent conductive electrode in optoelectronic devices. Wide emission range of this graphene-based LED opens up prospects for demonstrating white light-emitting devices from this novel combination.

    4. Hybrid Plasmonic Nanostructures with Unconventional Nonlinear Optical Properties (pages 331–337)

      Yong Zhang, Jing Jing Wang, Kyle E. Ballantine, Paul R. Eastham and Werner J. Blau

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300503

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      A hybrid nonlinear optical component is described based on a Au–PAA metal–dielectric assembly, which exhibits unconventional self-defocusing and inverse optical switching behavior. This heteronanostructure realizes SPR-induced nonlinear optics that enable an ultra-low threshold and an extraordinarily high nonlinear response. Such an SPR-induced nonlinear response can be further mani­pulated by more complex host–guest configuration such as Au–PAA–Au–C60.

    5. PVA Hydrogel Embedded with Quantum Dots: A Potential Scalable and Healable Display Medium for Holographic 3D Applications (pages 338–342)

      Min Zhu, Haizheng Zhong, Jia Jia, Wenping Fu, Juan Liu, Bingsuo Zou and Yongtian Wang

      Article first published online: 11 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300517

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      A PVA hydrogel embedded with quantum dots exhibits tunable emission as well as scalable and healable features. Their use as a display medium is then demonstrated for a computer-generated holographic 3D display technology.

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      Highly Directional Emission and Beam Steering from Organic Light-Emitting Diodes with a Substrate Diffractive Optical Element (pages 343–347)

      Shuyu Zhang, Graham A. Turnbull and Ifor D. W. Samuel

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300441

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      Highly directional emission from an organic light-emitting diode (OLED) is demonstrated by out-coupling the substrate mode from a Eu-based OLED using a diffractive optical element embedded in the substrate. This approach gives emission that is confined in a single narrow cone with FWHM divergence of 15° or less, which is very different from the normal Lambertian emission of OLEDs.

    7. Large Gain, Low Noise Nanocomposite Ultraviolet Photodetectors with a Linear Dynamic Range of 120 dB (pages 348–353)

      Yanjun Fang, Fawen Guo, Zhengguo Xiao and Jinsong Huang

      Article first published online: 28 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300530

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      A fullerene-based nanocomposite photodetector with peak quantum efficiency over 400% and specific detectivity of 6.5 × 1012 Jones at a wavelength of 390 nm is enabled by a cross-linked polymer:ZnO nanocomposite buffer layer. The introduced ZnO nanoparticles not only increase the photoconductive gain through a trap-controlled electron injection mechanism, but also effectively reduce the noise current, yielding a record linear dynamic range (LDR) of 120 dB.

  9. Frontispiece

    1. Top of page
    2. Cover Picture
    3. Inside Front Cover
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    5. Masthead
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      Optical Diodes: A Plasmonic Photonic Diode for Unidirectional Focusing, Imaging, and Wavelength Division De-Multiplexing (Advanced Optical Materials 4/2014) (page 354)

      Xinping Zhang, Jian Zhang, Hongmei Liu and Tianrui Zhai

      Article first published online: 14 APR 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201470024

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      A plasmonic photonic diode for unidirectional focusing, imaging, and wavelength-division de-multiplexing is achieved through the holographic imprinting of a discrete optical lens into metallic photonic crystals (MPCs). X. P. Zhang et al. focus laser beams of different colors to different angles and different focal lengths with a large dispersion using such a thin-film device. Realization of such functions is based on the spatial chirping of the MPCs, where the gold nanolines are arranged with different periods on different sites of the device.

  10. Full Papers

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    1. A Plasmonic Photonic Diode for Unidirectional Focusing, Imaging, and Wavelength Division De-Multiplexing (pages 355–363)

      Xinping Zhang, Jian Zhang, Hongmei Liu and Tianrui Zhai

      Article first published online: 4 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300491

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      Holographic imprinting is achieved by transferring the full functions of a conventional optical lens into plasmonic photonic structures with chirped periods. The resultant thin-film device not only possesses all the functions of a conventional lens for focusing and imaging, but also introduces multifold 'diode' effects and functions of wavelength division de-multiplexing with polarization dependence.

    2. Tuneable Nanostructuring of Highly Transparent Zinc Gallogermanate Glasses and Glass-Ceramics (pages 364–372)

      Sébastien Chenu, Emmanuel Véron, Cécile Genevois, Guy Matzen, Thierry Cardinal, Auriane Etienne, Dominique Massiot and Mathieu Allix

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201400007

      Thumbnail image of graphical abstract

      New highly transparent nanostructured gallogermanate-based glass and glass-ceramic materials are reported. These materials present nanoscale phase separation whose size can be tailored depending on the composition. The large variety of accessible compositions combined with the precise control over the nanostructure offer a great opportunity to design new highly transparent nanostructured materials with a wide range of tuneable optical properties.

    3. Compliant, Heterogeneously Integrated GaAs Micro-VCSELs towards Wearable and Implantable Integrated Optoelectronics Platforms (pages 373–381)

      Dongseok Kang, Sung-Min Lee, Zhengwei Li, Ashkan Seyedi, John O'Brien, Jianliang Xiao and Jongseung Yoon

      Article first published online: 8 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300533

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      Highly integrable microscale vertical cavity surface emitting lasers (micro-VCSELs) are developed for wearable, implantable optoelectronics. The specialized epitaxial and device design, together with printing-based integration, enables defect-free release of micro-VCSELs and device-level implementation on non-native substrates in scalable, programmable layouts. Large-scale, addressable arrays for flexible laser displays and heterogeneous assemblies with silicon-based electronics illustrate unique capabilities.

    4. Scaling Rules of SERS Intensity (pages 382–388)

      Yoshiaki Nishijima, Yoshikazu Hashimoto, Lorenzo Rosa, Jacob B. Khurgin and Saulius Juodkazis

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300493

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      Qualitative analysis of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) intensity is treated with well-defined structure using electron-beam lithography, FDTD simulations and numerical analysis. The unusual trends of SERS intensity decrease while the extinction increases observed in experiments is fully explained with a simple qualitative analytical description.

    5. Third Harmonic Generation of Optical Vortices Using Holography-Based Gold-Fork Microstructure (pages 389–393)

      Gui Xin Li, Shu Mei Chen, Yuan Cai, Shuang Zhang and Kok Wai Cheah

      Article first published online: 13 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300496

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      The vortex beam of SHG and THG are experimentally investigated using a holography-based gold-fork microstructure. The combination of the gold-fork microstructure with an organic thin film provides a new concept for producing harmonic generation of optical vortices, beam splitting of the nonlinear optical process, etc. The miniature metal–organic fork microstructure also opens new avenues for the integration of more optical functionalities into nonlinear optoelectronic devices.

    6. Ultra-confined Modes in Metal Nanoparticle Arrays for Subwavelength Light Guiding and Amplification (pages 394–399)

      Edgar Palacios, Aiqing Chen, Jonathan Foley, Stephen K. Gray, Ulrich Welp, Daniel Rosenmann and Vitalii K. Vlasko-Vlasov

      Article first published online: 12 FEB 2014 | DOI: 10.1002/adom.201300523

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      Ultraconfined propagating modes in dense plasmonic nanoparticle arrays on a metal mirror are found experimentally. FDTD calculations show that incident light intensity is strongly amplified and guided by the narrow nanoparticle layer or in the tiny nanoparticle-mirror gap. Such an enhancement and subwavelength propagation of light by ultraconfined eigen-modes offer multiple-photon sensing, harvesting, and guiding applications.

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