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Hydrothermal Carbonization of Abundant Renewable Natural Organic Chemicals for High-Performance Supercapacitor Electrodes

Authors

  • Lu Wei,

    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245, USA
    2. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Northwestern Polytechnical University, Xi’an, Shaanxi 710072, PR China
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  • Marta Sevilla,

    1. Instituto Nacional del Carbón (CSIC), P.O. Box 73, Oviedo 33080, Spain
    2. School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK
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  • Antonio B. Fuertes,

    1. Instituto Nacional del Carbón (CSIC), P.O. Box 73, Oviedo 33080, Spain
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  • Robert Mokaya,

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK
    • School of Chemistry, University of Nottingham, University Park, Nottingham, NG7 2RD, UK.
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  • Gleb Yushin

    Corresponding author
    1. School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245, USA
    • School of Materials Science and Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA 30332-0245, USA
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Abstract

original image

Cellulose, potato starch, and eucalyptus wood saw dust were transformed into porous carbons with micropore surface areas of up to 2387 m2/g. The specific capacitance of the produced carbons approaches 236 F/g (100 F/cc) when measured in a symmetric configuration in an organic electrolyte. Charge-discharge tests showed excellent capacitance retention with capacitance of up to 175 F/g at an ultra-high current density of 20 A/g.

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