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A dimensionless model for predicting the mass-transfer area of structured packing

Authors

  • Robert E. Tsai,

    Corresponding author
    1. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Process Science and Technology Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712
    • Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Process Science and Technology Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712
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  • A. Frank Seibert,

    1. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Process Science and Technology Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712
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  • R. Bruce Eldridge,

    1. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Process Science and Technology Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712
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  • Gary T. Rochelle

    1. Dept. of Chemical Engineering, Process Science and Technology Center, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX 78712
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Abstract

The mass-transfer area of nine structured packings was measured in a 0.427 m ID column via absorption of CO2 from air into 0.1 kmol/m3 NaOH. The mass-transfer area was most strongly related to the specific area (125–500 m2/m3), and liquid load (2.5–75 m3/m2·h). Surface tension (30–72 mN/m) had a weaker but significant effect. Gas velocity (0.6–2.3 m/s), liquid viscosity (1–15 mPa·s), and flow channel configuration had essentially no impact on the mass-transfer area. Surface texture (embossing) increased the effective area by 10% at most. The ratio of mass-transfer area to specific area (ae/ap) was correlated within the limits of ±13% for the entire experimental database equation image. © 2010 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 2010

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