An experimental investigation of nucleate pool boiling in aqueous solutions of a polymer

Authors

  • A. D. Athavale,

    1. Thermal-Fluids and Thermal Processing Laboratory, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221
    Search for more papers by this author
  • R. M. Manglik,

    Corresponding author
    1. Thermal-Fluids and Thermal Processing Laboratory, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221
    • Thermal-Fluids and Thermal Processing Laboratory, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221
    Search for more papers by this author
  • M. A. Jog

    1. Thermal-Fluids and Thermal Processing Laboratory, College of Engineering and Applied Science, University of Cincinnati, Cincinnati, OH 45221
    Search for more papers by this author

Abstract

Nucleate boiling characteristics of aqueous solutions of hydroxyl ethyl cellulose (HEC QP-300; M ∼ 600 kg/mol) in different concentrations (1.0 × 10−9C ≤ 4.0 × 10−9 mol/cc) are reported. These are viscous non-Newtonian, shear-thinning solutions that also display interfacial tension relaxation, which has both a concentration-dependent and temporal behavior; surface wetting increases as well, as measured by the reduction of contact angle. The measured pool boiling heat transfer from an electrically heated horizontal cylinder in C = 1.0 × 10−9 mol/cc aqueous solution is found to be enhanced by ∼20% over the entire heat flux range (4.0 < qmath image < 200 kW/m2). In higher concentration solutions, however, heat transfer degrades at low heat fluxes (incipience and partial boiling) with subsequent enhancement (∼45% maximum) at high heat fluxes or in the fully-developed nucleate boiling regime. This anomalous boiling behavior in the two regimes, characterized by respectively different ebullience signatures, is shown to be scaled with changes in the liquid-solid interface wetting, vapor-liquid interfacial tension, and shear-thinning viscosity of the polymeric solutions. © 2011 American Institute of Chemical Engineers AIChE J, 2012

Ancillary